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I was originally trying to follow this algorithm to create a little simple roguelike dungeon in C#. But I guess I'm just too stupid, because my result always came out a jumbled mess of crap.

I then switched over to my own algorithm, which produces not-great but semi-recognizable-as-a-dungeon results.

Does anyone have any examples of doing it the BSP way, as described in the linked article? It would be best if it weren't encumbered by a bunch of game details/library calls, because (again) I'm stupid.

(If you're especially masochistic and want me to post the code I had, I can, but I figured it'd be too much for an SO question.)

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Where does it fail? Does it generate reasonably aligned rooms but messes up the connection? Or does it blow up before that? –  biziclop Feb 14 '11 at 21:49
    
Before that. Here, I'll post a screenshot :P imgur.com/KXYW8 –  J Cooper Feb 14 '11 at 21:54
1  
I'd like to see the code you had for BSP. No one's forced to read it if they don't want to, but it won't hurt posting. –  IVlad Feb 14 '11 at 21:56
1  
Alright, here it is: gist.github.com/826649 –  J Cooper Feb 14 '11 at 22:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This doesn't link the rooms yet, but it generates okay dungeons using the algorithm described. (Unfortunately it is in Java but I tried to add some comments to clarify what is being done.)

public static class Rectangle {  

    private static int MIN_SIZE = 5;
    private static Random rnd = new Random(); 

    private int top, left, width, height;
    private Rectangle leftChild;
    private Rectangle rightChild;
    private Rectangle dungeon;

    public Rectangle(int top, int left, int height, int width) {
        this.top = top;
        this.left = left;
        this.width = width;
        this.height = height;
    }

    public boolean split() {
        if( leftChild != null ) //if already split, bail out
            return false;
        boolean horizontal = rnd.nextBoolean(); //direction of split
        int max = (horizontal ? height : width ) - MIN_SIZE; //maximum height/width we can split off
        if( max <= MIN_SIZE ) // area too small to split, bail out
            return false;
        int split = rnd.nextInt( max ); // generate split point 
        if( split < MIN_SIZE )  // adjust split point so there's at least MIN_SIZE in both partitions
            split = MIN_SIZE;
        if( horizontal ) { //populate child areas
            leftChild = new Rectangle( top, left, split, width ); 
            rightChild = new Rectangle( top+split, left, height-split, width );
        } else {
            leftChild = new Rectangle( top, left, height, split );
            rightChild = new Rectangle( top, left+split, height, width-split );
        }
        return true; //split successful
    }

    public void generateDungeon() {
        if( leftChild != null ) { //if current are has child areas, propagate the call
            leftChild.generateDungeon();
            rightChild.generateDungeon();
        } else { // if leaf node, create a dungeon within the minimum size constraints
            int dungeonTop = (height - MIN_SIZE <= 0) ? 0 : rnd.nextInt( height - MIN_SIZE);
            int dungeonLeft =  (width - MIN_SIZE <= 0) ? 0 : rnd.nextInt( width - MIN_SIZE);
            int dungeonHeight = Math.max(rnd.nextInt( height - dungeonTop ), MIN_SIZE );;
            int dungeonWidth = Math.max(rnd.nextInt( width - dungeonLeft ), MIN_SIZE );;
            dungeon = new Rectangle( top + dungeonTop, left+dungeonLeft, dungeonHeight, dungeonWidth);
        }
    }

}

And here's a test class to demonstrate its usage:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Random;


public class GenerateDungeon {

    private static Random rnd = new Random(); 



    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ArrayList<Rectangle> rectangles = new ArrayList<Rectangle>(); // flat rectangle store to help pick a random one
        Rectangle root = new Rectangle( 0, 0, 60, 120 ); //
        rectangles.add( root  ); //populate rectangle store with root area
        while( rectangles.size() < 19 ) { // this will give us 10 leaf areas
            int splitIdx = rnd.nextInt( rectangles.size() ); // choose a random element
            Rectangle toSplit = rectangles.get( splitIdx); 
            if( toSplit.split() ) { //attempt to split
                rectangles.add( toSplit.leftChild );
                rectangles.add( toSplit.rightChild );
            } 

        }
        root.generateDungeon(); //generate dungeons

        printDungeons(rectangles); //this is just to test the output

    }



    private static void printDungeons(ArrayList<Rectangle> rectangles) {
        byte [][] lines = new byte[60][];
        for( int i = 0; i < 60; i++ ) {
            lines[ i ] = new byte[120];
            for( int j = 0; j < 120; j++ )
                lines[ i ][ j ] =  -1;
        }
        byte dungeonCount = -1;
        for( Rectangle r : rectangles ) {
            if( r.dungeon == null )
                continue;
            Rectangle d = r.dungeon;
            dungeonCount++;
            for( int i = 0; i < d.height; i++ ) {
                for( int j = 0; j < d.width; j++ )

                    lines[ d.top + i ][ d.left+ j ] = dungeonCount;
            }
        }
        for( int i = 0; i < 60; i++ ) {
            for( int j = 0; j < 120; j++ ) {
                if( lines[ i ][ j ] == -1 )
                    System.out.print( '.');
                else
                    System.out.print( lines[ i ][ j ] );
            }
            System.out.println();
        }
    }

}
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Thanks! I think I was somewhat close to this but this helps a lot. –  J Cooper Feb 15 '11 at 5:00

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