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I've struggled a lot with Java but could not combine a working example of Java .wav to .mp3 converter. This converter will be used in a Java applet so it should depend only on libraries written in pure Java with no underlying C code calls.

Can anyone provide a fully working example?

Thank you

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Well, you'd need a .way decoder and an .mp3 encoder written in pure Java. Is there such a thing? I doubt it. –  delnan Feb 14 '11 at 22:19
    
possible duplicate of MP3 Encoding in Java –  Chris Dennett Feb 14 '11 at 23:00
    
close, though answers here were much more useful –  Ivan Suhinin Feb 15 '11 at 8:26
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Read your wave file @ http://java.sun.com/javase/technologies/desktop/media/jmf/ and encode to mp3 @ http://openinnowhere.sourceforge.net/lameonj/

As pointed out, lameonj is not a pure java solution. For that the options don't seem so many, but see the other SO question: MP3 Encoding in Java

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that one will require native LAME binaries –  mihi Feb 14 '11 at 22:34
    
+1 for conciseness –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 14 '11 at 22:35
    
Thanks, I think I'll combine your answer with NestedVM answer –  Ivan Suhinin Feb 15 '11 at 8:22
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If speed is not important for you, take any c implementation of MP3 (e. g. lame) and try to compile it with NestedVM to Java bytecode. It will be slow (like an emulator in an emulator), but it should work.

And it should be way less work than trying to port a MP3 library to pure Java.

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Thanks, look like this is my only option. –  Ivan Suhinin Feb 15 '11 at 8:23
    
+1 for bringing NestedVM to my attention. Very cool. –  Nathan Kidd Feb 15 '11 at 16:16
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Another potentially relevant project is jffmpeg. This apparently aimed to an JMF support for a wide range of formats using both native and Java codecs. Judging from the 'formats' page, they made significant progress on the pure Java side. Unfortunately, the project has gone quiet.

This doesn't directly help the OP in the short term. But if he or others are keen to have pure Java codecs in the long term, consider getting involved.

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Just check out the following source code. http://jsidplay2.cvs.sourceforge.net/jsidplay2/jump3r It is still work in progress, but a working example of the encoder part of a pure java based lame library.

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