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I obtained the folloiwng equation (as an example):

{2 w11 + 3 w21 == 2 w12, w11 == 4 w12 + 3 w22, w11 + 2 w21 + w22 == 0,
  2 w12 + w21 + 2 w22 == 0}

And I want to determine w11, w12, w21, w22. However, simply do the following:

Solve[{3 w11 + 2 w21 == 5 w11 + 3 w12, w11 + w21 == 5 w21 + 3 w22, 
  3 w12 + 2 w22 == -2 w11 - w12, w12 + w22 == -2 w21 - w22}, {w11, 
  w12, w21, w22}]

Because the system of equations is under-determined. I have one thought, i.e. using matrix algebra. But I need to automatically group those coefficients in front of w11, w12, w21, w22 into a matrix (list of lists) then go from there. But I am not sure how to manipulate these equations easily to generate such a matrix. Please help, or if you have better ideas, please share too.

Many thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Leonid Shifrin's response looks to be right on target. But I have a prior question. What is it you do not like about the result from Solve? (That is, why do you need to go to a different formulation of teh problem?) –  Daniel Lichtblau Feb 14 '11 at 23:17
    
@Daniel, I got an error saying Solve::svars: Equations may not give solutions for all "solve" variables. since this is under-determined. –  Qiang Li Feb 14 '11 at 23:39
    
Yes, that happens precisely because it is underdetermined. And the solution then displayed has some variables in effect made into parameters, with the others solved in terms thereof. But since the input is underdetermined, I don't see what else you might have in mind for representing the solution set. –  Daniel Lichtblau Feb 14 '11 at 23:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here are your equations and variables:

vars = {w11, w12, w21, w22};
eqs = {2 w11 + 3 w21 == 2 w12, w11 == 4 w12 + 3 w22, 
   w11 + 2 w21 + w22 == 0, 2 w12 + w21 + 2 w22 == 0};

Here is the matrix:

In[48]:= matrix =  Transpose[ eqs /. Equal :> Subtract /. 
    Map[Thread[vars -> #] &, IdentityMatrix[Length[vars]]]]

Out[48]= {{2, -2, 3, 0}, {1, -4, 0, -3}, {1, 0, 2, 1}, {0, 2, 1, 2}}

EDIT:

The same works for your second group of equations:

In[49]:= eqs = {3 w11 + 2 w21 == 5 w11 + 3 w12,  w11 + w21 == 5 w21 + 3 w22, 
  3 w12 + 2 w22 == -2 w11 - w12,  w12 + w22 == -2 w21 - w22};   

In[50]:= matrix = Transpose[ eqs /. Equal :> Subtract /. 
    Map[Thread[vars -> #] &, IdentityMatrix[Length[vars]]]]

Out[50]= {{-2, -3, 2, 0}, {1, 0, -4, -3}, {2, 4, 0, 2}, {0, 1, 2, 2}}

EDIT:

Expanding on the solution, upon request. First, how it works: the idea is to first bring all variables to the left, which is achieved by replacing the equals operator with subtraction:

In[69]:= eqs = {3 w11 + 2 w21 == 5 w11 + 3 w12,  w11 + w21 == 5 w21 + 3 w22, 
     3 w12 + 2 w22 == -2 w11 - w12,  w12 + w22 == -2 w21 - w22};

In[70]:= eqs /. Equal :> Subtract

Out[70]= {-2 w11 - 3 w12 + 2 w21, w11 - 4 w21 - 3 w22, 2 w11 + 4 w12 + 2 w22, w12 + 2 w21 + 2 w22}

The rules are constructed so that for any group of rules, only one variable is set to 1, and the rest to 0:

 In[71]:= Map[Thread[vars -> #] &, IdentityMatrix[Length[vars]]]

 Out[71]= {{w11 -> 1, w12 -> 0, w21 -> 0, w22 -> 0}, {w11 -> 0, w12 -> 1, w21 -> 0, w22 -> 0}, 
        {w11 -> 0, w12 -> 0, w21 -> 1, w22 -> 0}, {w11 -> 0, w12 -> 0, w21 -> 0, w22 -> 1}}

This allows to compute the coefficients:

In[72]:= eqs /. Equal :> Subtract /. Map[Thread[vars -> #] &, IdentityMatrix[Length[vars]]]

Out[72]= {{-2, 1, 2, 0}, {-3, 0, 4, 1}, {2, -4, 0, 2}, {0, -3, 2, 2}}

Upon inspecting how the rules work, it is easy to see that we need to apply Transpose to the result.

Now, your second request requires more work:

In[53]:= eqs = {3 w11 + 2 w12 == 5 w11 + 3 w21 + a, w11 + w12 == 5 w12 + 3 w22 - c, 
   3 w21 + 2 w22 + b == a - 2 w11 - w21, w21 + w22 == f - 2 w12 - w22};

In[55]:= modifiedEqs = With[{alts = Alternatives @@ vars},
   eqs //. {lhs_ == HoldPattern[Plus[left___, x_, right___]] /; !FreeQ[x, alts] :> 
                    lhs - x == left + right,
            HoldPattern[Plus[left___, x_, right___] == rhs_] /; FreeQ[x, alts] :> 
           (left + right == rhs - x)}]

Out[55]= {-2 w11 + 2 w12 - 3 w21 == a, w11 - 4 w12 - 3 w22 == -c,  
     2 w11 + 4 w21 + 2 w22 == a - b,   2 w12 + w21 + 2 w22 == f}

In[68]:= matrix = {Transpose[# /. (lhs_ == rhs_) :> lhs /. 
    Map[Thread[vars -> #] &, IdentityMatrix[Length[vars]]]], #[[All,2]]} &[modifiedEqs]

Out[68]= {{{-2, 2, -3, 0}, {1, -4, 0, -3}, {2, 0, 4, 2}, {0, 2, 1,  2}}, {a, -c, a - b, f}}

The main difference is that we need an extra step to separate the constants and bring them to the r.h.s. You may find it more useful to figure out the details of how this works yourself.

Edit:

Yes, I forgot to mention: to understand the solution, you should know what happens when you apply rules in nested lists - in this case, each list of rules inside a larger lists results in a transformed copy of an expression, for example:

In[73]:= {a, b, c} /. {{a -> 1}, {b -> 1}, {c -> 1}}

Out[73]= {{1, b, c}, {a, 1, c}, {a, b, 1}}

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
This assumes that the equations are homogeneous, without any constants on the r.h.s. –  Leonid Shifrin Feb 14 '11 at 23:07
    
what if I want to form both the coefficient matrix and the imhomogeneous vector for equations like {3 w11 + 2 w12 == 5 w11 + 3 w21 + a, w11 + w12 == 5 w12 + 3 w22 - c, 3 w21 + 2 w22 + b == a - 2 w11 - w21, w21 + w22 == f - 2 w12 - w22}? Could you also please explain a little bit how the Transpose[ eqs /. Equal :> Subtract /. Map[Thread[vars -> #] &, IdentityMatrix[Length[vars]]]] command does. Many thanks. –  Qiang Li Feb 14 '11 at 23:54
    
great, thank you so much! –  Qiang Li Feb 15 '11 at 1:36

There is a built-in function CoefficientArrays for converting systems of linear (or polynomial) equations into a matrix form.

The matrix you want is the second part of the result:

In[7]:= vars = {w11, w12, w21, w22};

In[8]:= CoefficientArrays[{2 w11 + 3 w21 == 2 w12, 
   w11 == 4 w12 + 3 w22, w11 + 2 w21 + w22 == 0, 
   2 w12 + w21 + 2 w22 == 0}, vars] // Normal

Out[8]= {{0, 0, 0, 
  0}, {{2, -2, 3, 0}, {1, -4, 0, -3}, {1, 0, 2, 1}, {0, 2, 1, 2}}}

The inhomogeneous part is the first part of the result, a vector:

In[9]:= CoefficientArrays[{3 w11 + 2 w12 == 5 w11 + 3 w21 + a, 
   w11 + w12 == 5 w12 + 3 w22 - c, 
   3 w21 + 2 w22 + b == a - 2 w11 - w21, 
   w21 + w22 == f - 2 w12 - w22}, vars] // Normal

Out[9]= {{-a, 
  c, -a + b, -f}, {{-2, 2, -3, 0}, {1, -4, 0, -3}, {2, 0, 4, 2}, {0, 
   2, 1, 2}}}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, this is the superior solution. Incidentally, you don't need a variable list, CoefficientArrays can determine them on them own. –  rcollyer Feb 15 '11 at 3:56
    
great! I was just curious how one can find those built-in functions (per my previous question too) quickly. :) Even Daniel Lichtblau who is with Mma r&d suggested to go with Leonid's method. –  Qiang Li Feb 15 '11 at 4:22
    
+1, indeed much better. Nice to know, thanks! –  Leonid Shifrin Feb 15 '11 at 11:53
    
@Qiang Li, the only tried and true method for finding out the built-in functions, is to read through the documentation, especially the tutorials. Also, follow the links to other functions at the bottom of the help file, and through those methods you should find out about 50-75% of the functions. You'll miss some good stuff, but you'll get most of the immediately useful stuff. –  rcollyer Feb 15 '11 at 16:26

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