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I wonder how can I do the following thing with sed: I need to keep only the first three words in each line. For example, the following text:

the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy bear
the blue lion is hungry

will be transformed in:

the quick brown
the blue lion
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Note: when I added the question I forgot about "cut", which is the right tool to do the job: cut -f-3 -d" " –  Bear Bear Mar 5 '13 at 23:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted
cut -d' ' -f1-3

ignore: Oops! Your answer couldn't be submitted because:

body must be at least 30 characters; you entered 15
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not sed - but a nice answer –  warren Nov 27 '12 at 3:36
2  
If you're happy with an answer, remember to click the check mark next to it so others know you've got your answer. –  Ed Morton Mar 17 '13 at 23:03
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"Oops!" ...: stupidest SO policy ever. –  jameshfisher Apr 12 at 17:31
1  
Note -f-3 is equivalent to -f1-3. That is -3 will mean: all fields up to 3. –  fedorqui Nov 18 at 8:54
1  
I didn't know that, thanks. I suspect I'll continue writing -f1-3 though for clarity and because I'll forget the abbreviation! –  Ed Morton Nov 18 at 16:13

Does it have to be sed? In awk it's easy: {print $1,$2,$3}.

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Brilliant thanks was looking for something to strip out the first word from a command of running ec2 instances, was messing around with sed and cut but awk is perfect for my requirements –  Shawn Vader Sep 5 '13 at 9:14
% (echo "A B C D E F G H";echo "a b c d e f g h") | sed -E 's/([^\s].){3}//'

I put the "-E" in there for OS X compatibility. Other Unix systems may or may not need it.

edit: damnitall - brainfart. use this:

% sed -E 's/(([^ ]+ ){3}).*/\1/' <<END
the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy bear
the blue lion is hungry
END

the quick brown 
the blue lion 
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+1 for a more concise solution with sed - although you might want to edit your post to remove your first attempt. –  thkala Mar 14 '13 at 12:04

I would suggest awk in this situation:

awk '{print $1,$2,$3}' ./infile

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Just using the shell

while read -r a b c d
do
  echo $a $b $c
done < file

Ruby(1.9)+

ruby -ane 'print "#{$F[0]} #{$F[1]} #{$F[2]}\n"' file
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'puts $F[0..2].join " "' is somewhat more concise for the ruby. –  glenn jackman Jul 19 '13 at 22:22

If you need a sed script, you can try:

echo "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy bear" | sed 's/^\([a-zA-Z]\+\ [a-zA-Z]\+\ [a-zA-Z]\+\).*/\1/'

But I think it would be easier using cut:

echo "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy bear" | cut -d' ' -f1,2,3
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Cut doesn't cope with variations in the whitespacing used. –  cbz Feb 14 '11 at 23:40
    
Nor does including one literal space in the sed command (which doesn't need to be escaped, by the way). –  Dennis Williamson Feb 15 '11 at 2:23

Here's an ugly one with sed:

$ echo the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy bear | sed 's|^\(\([^[:space:]]\+[[:space:]]\+\)\{2\}[^[:space:]]\+\).*|\1|'
the quick brown
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