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I am using ASIHTTPRequest to POST data to a remote server on iPhone 4.2.1. When I make the following post request to our server, I get a 400 response (I removed the IP address):

   NSString dataString = @"data1=00&data2=00&data3=00";

   ASIHTTPRequest *request = [ASIHTTPRequest requestWithURL:[NSURL URLWithString:[NSString stringWithFormat:<ipremoved>]]];
   [request appendPostData:[dataString dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]];
   [request setRequestMethod:@"POST"];
   [request addRequestHeader:@"User-Agent" value:@"iphone app"];
   [request addRequestHeader:@"Content-Type" value:@"application/octet-stream"];
   request.delegate = self;
   [request startAsynchronous];

When I send the same data using curl, I receive a 200 response:

    curl -H "User-Agent: iphone app" -H "Accept:" -H "Content-Type:application/octet-stream" --data-ascii "data1=00&data2=00&data3=00" --location <ipremoved> -v

My colleague is stating that, in the failure case, the ASIHTTPRequest requires two socket reads: one for the header and one for the data. Apparently the server is not presently equipped to parse this correctly, so I am trying to work around it.

If I setup a proxy between iPhone and my Mac and run Paros (to see packets), the problem goes away. Paros combine the header and data so that it is all acquired by the server in a single socket read.

I've tried a few things suggested in other posts including disabling persistent connections, but I am not having any luck. I've also tried doing a ASIHTTPFormRequest, but the server does not like the generated data format.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

"My colleague is stating that, in the failure case, the ASIHTTPRequest requires two socket reads: one for the header and one for the data. Apparently the server is not presently equipped to parse this correctly, so I am trying to work around it."

Do you know this for a fact, or is it guesswork? Such a HTTP server would be very broken, and would cause all sorts of random problems.

Have you looked at what Paros is receiving and what it is sending? It is possible it is fixing up an error in the request by chance, and if it is you can fix the request up in the same way.

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I was able to confirm on my end that the full HTTP request is sent in two TCP segments - one containing only the header and the other containing the data. Paros simply combines these two TCP segments into a single TCP segment before sending it along. I agree that the server does seem broken or at least improperly configured. –  chris.o. Feb 15 '11 at 18:10
    
It really seems a bit weird - what if the request exceeds 1500 bytes? It will /have/ to be broken up into 2 packets. I appreciate that the most obvious thing Paros is doing is combining the two packets (and sorry for labouring this point, but it is very common for http proxies to rewrite requests): have you checked through the packets byte-by-byte and made sure that is the only difference? –  JosephH Feb 16 '11 at 8:56
    
I can actually verify that this is what ASIHttpRequest is doing, i have setup Wireshark on my mac and watched it happen. I am dealing with the same problem because of the same server side issue - the problem i have is its a 3rd party system that i have no control over - on their side, they essentially did the same combination and it goes through, not sure where to go from here –  Josh Jan 20 '12 at 0:02

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