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How should I change the code below so that Array<Index> array; is enough and the SIZE is automatically deduced from the enum?
Even if the enum changes, it is guaranteed that it contains SIZE referring to the correct size.

template <typename Enum, int N>
class Array {

public:
    int& operator[](Enum index) { return array[index]; }

private:
    int array[N];
};

enum Index { X, Y, SIZE };

int main() {

    Array<Index, SIZE> array;

    array[X] = 1;

    return 0;
}

UPDATE: As for "Array<type> means you're creating an array of Type objects" (Jerry) and "the name of class template is a bit misleading" (Nawaz): actually I am creating CustomSqlQueryModel<TableColumns>. The above is just a simplified code, nothing more. Jerry and Nawaz are rigth: this simplified code is unfortunate.

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You can't calculate a count of enum elements in an enum. –  Crazy Eddie Feb 15 '11 at 0:14
    
True but in my case it is guaranteed to have a SIZE referring to the number of elements. –  Ali Feb 15 '11 at 0:16
    
I guess I don't understand the question. –  Crazy Eddie Feb 15 '11 at 0:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can write a traits class. This requires a bit of extra work each time you define a new enum type, but no extra work for each occurrence of Array<Index> in user code:

template<class Enum>
struct ArrayTraits;

template<class Enum>
struct Array {
  int& operator[](Enum index) { return array[index]; }

private:
  int array[ArrayTraits<Enum>::size];
};

enum Index { X, Y, SIZE };

template<>
struct ArrayTraits<Index> {
  enum { size = SIZE };
};


int main() {
  Array<Index> array;
  array[X] = 1;
  return 0;
}

One of the advantages of this is you can specialize the traits for external enums you don't control, as long as you know how to get the max size.

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@Ali: Also, if you're using code generation for these enums (generated from a schema of some kind, for example), then this boilerplate traits is very easy to keep updated. –  Fred Nurk Feb 15 '11 at 4:33

If you want only the size to be template argument, not the type , as from your example it seems that the type of the array would be always int, then why don't you implement this:

template <int size>
class Array {

public:
    int& operator[](int index) { return array[index]; }

    //Note this addition!
    int operator[](int index) const { return array[index]; }
private:
    int array[size];
};

int main() {

    Array<10> array;

    array[0] = 1;
    array[1] = 2;

    return 0;
}

Note this addition: it's better if you implement const version of operator[] too, so that const Array<> can use it to access the array elements, otherwise your class wouldn't work for const Array<>.

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1  
I need the enum template argument, it makes accessing array elements safe. There is no such safety with int-s. Thanks for the answer anyhow. –  Ali Feb 15 '11 at 2:07
    
@Ali: What safety you're talking about? And how exactly it is achieved with enum? Please explain. –  Nawaz Feb 15 '11 at 2:10
1  
@Nawaz Yes, if you cast you can but it is your responsibility then, as it always is when it comes to casts. As I have written in the update I use this array to access columns in a database table, and I do not want to use int-s and magic numbers for that, I need the column names in the enum. –  Ali Feb 15 '11 at 2:27
1  
@Nawaz Yes, but I do not write loops. I use it for accessing columns in a database table which have meaningful names. –  Ali Feb 15 '11 at 2:32
1  
@Nawaz I can just repeat myself: I am creating custom SQL queries, and it is perfectly fine to pass a template argument enum with the column NAMES (not types) to it. I am NOT iterating through any array. My code is just a simplified code. –  Ali Feb 15 '11 at 2:43

As stated, I don't think you can. If, however, you change it to something like:

struct Index { 
    enum { X, Y, SIZE};
};

Then your template could be something like:

template <class Enum>
class Array { 
// ...

private:
    int array[Enum::SIZE];
};

...and if the type you pass as Enum doesn't include some positive constant named SIZE,the instantiation won't compile. For the purpose at hand, you'd really kind of prefer that Index was a namespace, but since a namespace isn't a type, I don't think you can use it as a template argument.

I should add, however, that I'm not sure I like this idea at all -- most people are going to think Array<type> means you're creating an array of Type objects, and this is clearly something entirely different from that...

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Thanks. The problem with the struct approach is that you will have to write: array[Enum::X] = 1; and that is just ugly :( As for "Array<type> means you're creating an array of Type objects" you are right, actually I am creating CustomSqlQueryModel<TableColumns>. Probably I should have come up with a better simplified example code. –  Ali Feb 15 '11 at 0:32
5  
C++0x's new enumerations will allow you to pass the enumeration type and say Enum::Size then directly, without needing to wrap in a class –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 15 '11 at 0:36
    
@Johannes Cool :) Please post it as an answer! –  Ali Feb 15 '11 at 0:59
    
@Ali: you'll also have to say Enum::X because those are scoped enum although IMNSHO this is a good thing. Stating the enum kind before its enumerator gives context to the reader. –  Matthieu M. Feb 15 '11 at 7:31
    
@Matthieu Could you please expand on this? I am afraid I do not follow :( –  Ali Feb 15 '11 at 12:39

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