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I read on here of an exercise in interviews known as validating a binary search tree.

How exactly does this work? What would one be looking for in validating a binary search tree? I have written a basic search tree, but never heard of this concept.

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11  
Use inorder traversal, and check if each element is greater than the previous element. –  dalle Mar 30 '10 at 8:16

22 Answers 22

Actually that is the mistake everybody does in an interview.

Leftchild must be checked against (minLimitof node,node.value)

Rightchild must be checked against (node.value,MaxLimit of node)

IsValidBST(root,-infinity,infinity);

bool IsValidBST(BinaryNode node, int MIN, int MAX) 
{
     if(node == null)
         return true;
     if(node.element > MIN 
         && node.element < MAX
         && IsValidBST(node.left,MIN,node.element)
         && IsValidBST(node.right,node.element,MAX))
         return true;
     else 
         return false;
}

Another solution (if space is not a constraint): Do an inorder traversal of the tree and store the node values in an array. If the array is in sorted order, its a valid BST otherwise not.

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17  
"Another solution(if space is not a constraint) Do an inorder traversal of the tree and store the node values in an array. If the array is in sorted order, its a valid BST otherwise not."... Well you don't need space or an array to do that. If you can do the traversal in the first place, and the array that you would create should be sorted, then each element that you visit during the traversal must be greater (or, in the limit case, equal) to the previous one, right? –  Daniel Daranas Apr 17 '09 at 10:33
    
Yes. I agree with that. but still we need one global variable to assign and access the previous value in the recursive calls. and its better than my previous example passing (MIN,MAX) on each call and eat up space on stack. Thanks –  g0na Apr 17 '09 at 10:50
    
Your algorithm is wrong... as if you have a tree with one root of value: 2 and one right child with value: 2, you will say it isn't a BST, when in fact it is. –  Yarneo Sep 20 '12 at 14:55
2  
@Yarneo A valid BST contains no duplicate nodes so I believe this algorithm is correct: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_search_tree –  user784637 Jan 20 '13 at 23:35
    
@DanielDaranas can you tell me the runtime of this algorithm? –  Prince Jan 17 '14 at 20:36

"Validating" a binary search tree means that you check that it does indeed have all smaller items on the left and large items on the right. Essentially, it's a check to see if a binary tree is a binary search tree.

This page allows you to draw a binary tree and validate it to see if it's a binary search tree.

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@j32: The page you linked to doesn't 'do' anything. It's just doco... –  Mitch Wheat Feb 1 '09 at 1:56
1  
It has a Java applet that allows you draw a binary tree... Anyway, that was just an example usage of the term. –  wj32 Feb 1 '09 at 2:00
2  
broken page, fyi –  dotcomXY Nov 8 '13 at 20:16

Iterative solution using inorder traversal.

bool is_bst(Node *root) {
  if (!root)
    return true;

  std::stack<Node*> stack;
  bool started = false;
  Node *node = root;
  int prev_val;

  while(true) {
    if (node) {
      stack.push(node);
      node = node->left();
      continue;
    }
    if (stack.empty())
      break;
    node = stack.top();
    stack.pop();

    /* beginning of bst check */
    if(!started) {
      prev_val = node->val();
      started = true;
    } else {
      if (prev_val > node->val())
        return false;
      prev_val = node->val();
    }
    /* end of bst check */

    node = node->right();
  }
  return true;
}
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Good note to point out from your solution is that recursive solutions can sometimes be bad news on a production instance if you smash the stack –  Grambot Jul 19 '12 at 13:58

Here is my solution in Clojure:

(defstruct BST :val :left :right)

(defn in-order [bst]
  (when-let [{:keys [val, left, right]} bst]
    (lazy-seq
      (concat (in-order left) (list val) (in-order right)))))

(defn is-strictly-sorted? [col]
  (every?
    (fn [[a b]] (< a  b))
    (partition 2 1 col)))

(defn is-valid-BST [bst]
  (is-strictly-sorted? (in-order bst)))
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The best solution I found is O(n) and it uses no extra space. It is similar to inorder traversal but instead of storing it to array and then checking whether it is sorted we can take a static variable and check while inorder traversing whether array is sorted.

static struct node *prev = NULL;

bool isBST(struct node* root)
{
    // traverse the tree in inorder fashion and keep track of prev node
    if (root)
    {
        if (!isBST(root->left))
          return false;

        // Allows only distinct valued nodes
        if (prev != NULL && root->data <= prev->data)
          return false;

        prev = root;

        return isBST(root->right);
    }

    return true;
}
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Recursive solution:

isBinary(root)
    {
        if root == null 
          return true
       else if( root.left == NULL and root.right == NULL)
          return true
       else if(root.left == NULL)
           if(root.right.element > root.element)
               rerturn isBInary(root.right)
        else if (root.left.element < root.element)
              return isBinary(root.left)
        else
              return isBInary(root.left) and isBinary(root.right)

    }
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Since the in-order traversal of a BST is a non-decrease sequence, we could use this property to judge whether a binary tree is BST or not. Using Morris traversal and maintaining the pre node, we could get a solution in O(n) time complexity and O(1) space complexity. Here is my code

public boolean isValidBST(TreeNode root) {
    TreeNode pre = null, cur = root, tmp;
    while(cur != null) {
        if(cur.left == null) {
            if(pre != null && pre.val >= cur.val) 
                return false;
            pre = cur;
            cur = cur.right;
        }
        else {
            tmp = cur.left;
            while(tmp.right != null && tmp.right != cur)
                tmp = tmp.right;
            if(tmp.right == null) { // left child has not been visited
                tmp.right = cur;
                cur = cur.left;
            }
            else { // left child has been visited already
                tmp.right = null;
                if(pre != null && pre.val >= cur.val) 
                    return false;
                pre = cur;
                cur = cur.right;
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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bool BinarySearchTree::validate() {
    int minVal = -1;
    int maxVal = -1;
    return ValidateImpl(root, minVal, maxVal);
}

bool BinarySearchTree::ValidateImpl(Node *currRoot, int &minVal, int &maxVal)
{
    int leftMin = -1;
    int leftMax = -1;
    int rightMin = -1;
    int rightMax = -1;

    if (currRoot == NULL) return true;

    if (currRoot->left) {
        if (currRoot->left->value < currRoot->value) {
            if (!ValidateImpl(currRoot->left, leftMin, leftMax)) return false;
            if (leftMax != currRoot->left->value && currRoot->value < leftMax)  return false;
        }
        else
            return false;
    } else {
        leftMin = leftMax = currRoot->value;
    }

    if (currRoot->right) {
        if (currRoot->right->value > currRoot->value) {
            if(!ValidateImpl(currRoot->right, rightMin, rightMax)) return false;
            if (rightMin != currRoot->right->value && currRoot->value > rightMin)  return false;
        }
        else return false;
    } else {
        rightMin = rightMax = currRoot->value;
    }

    minVal = leftMin < rightMin ? leftMin : rightMin;
    maxVal = leftMax > rightMax ? leftMax : rightMax;

    return true;
}
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bool ValidateBST(Node *pCurrentNode, int nMin = INT_MIN, int nMax = INT_MAX)
{
    return
    (
        pCurrentNode == NULL
    )
    ||
    (
        (
            !pCurrentNode->pLeftNode ||
            (
                pCurrentNode->pLeftNode->value < pCurrentNode->value &&
                pCurrentNode->pLeftNode->value < nMax &&
                ValidateBST(pCurrentNode->pLeftNode, nMin, pCurrentNode->value)
            )
        )
        &&
        (
            !pCurrentNode->pRightNode ||
            (
                pCurrentNode->pRightNode->value > pCurrentNode->value &&
                pCurrentNode->pRightNode->value > nMin &&
                ValidateBST(pCurrentNode->pRightNode, pCurrentNode->value, nMax)
            )
        )
    );
}
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My intention is to show another solution where the recursion doesn't go into a branch unless it's valid. The current top answer must go into a branch to check it's validity... –  Mike X May 20 '12 at 4:22
// using inorder traverse based Impl
bool BinarySearchTree::validate() {
    int val = -1;
    return ValidateImpl(root, val);
}

// inorder traverse based Impl
bool BinarySearchTree::ValidateImpl(Node *currRoot, int &val) {
    if (currRoot == NULL) return true;

    if (currRoot->left) {
        if (currRoot->left->value > currRoot->value) return false;
        if(!ValidateImpl(currRoot->left, val)) return false;
    }

    if (val > currRoot->value) return false;
    val = currRoot->value;

    if (currRoot->right) {
        if (currRoot->right->value < currRoot->value) return false;
        if(!ValidateImpl(currRoot->right, val)) return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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"It's better to define an invariant first. Here the invariant is -- any two sequential elements of the BST in the in-order traversal must be in strictly increasing order of their appearance (can't be equal, always increasing in in-order traversal). So solution can be just a simple in-order traversal with remembering the last visited node and comparison the current node against the last visited one to '<' (or '>')."

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To find out whether given BT is BST for any datatype, you need go with below approach. 1. call recursive function till the end of leaf node using inorder traversal 2. Build your min and max values yourself.

Tree element must have less than / greater than operator defined.

#define MIN (FirstVal, SecondVal) ((FirstVal) < (SecondVal)) ? (FirstVal):(SecondVal)
#define MAX (FirstVal, SecondVal) ((FirstVal) > (SecondVal)) ? (FirstVal):(SecondVal)

template <class T>
bool IsValidBST (treeNode &root)
{

   T min,  max;
   return IsValidBST (root, &min, &max);
}

template <class T>
bool IsValidBST (treeNode *root, T *MIN , T *MAX)
{
   T leftMin, leftMax, rightMin, rightMax;
   bool isValidBST;

   if (root->leftNode == NULL && root->rightNode == NULL)
   {
      *MIN = root->element;
      *MAX = root->element;
      return true;
   }

  isValidBST = IsValidBST (root->leftNode, &leftMin, &leftMax);

  if (isValidBST)
    isValidBST = IsValidBST (root->rightNode, &rightMin, &rightMax);

  if (isValidBST)
  {
     *MIN = MIN (leftMIN, rightMIN);
     *Max = MAX (rightMax, leftMax);
  }

  return isValidBST;
}
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Probably should fix up your code -- you've made pre-processor macros of MIN and MAX, but then try to use MIN and MAX as variable (parameter) names. –  MikeB Jan 31 '13 at 18:18
bool isBST(struct node* root)
{
    static struct node *prev = NULL;
    // traverse the tree in inorder fashion and keep track of prev node
    if (root)
    {
        if (!isBST(root->left))
            return false;
        // Allows only distinct valued nodes
        if (prev != NULL && root->data <= prev->data)
            return false;
        prev = root;
        return isBST(root->right);
    }
    return true;
}

Works Fine :)

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1  
This doesn't work if you call it more than once, and it's also not thread safe. –  Andrey Feb 12 '13 at 15:46

Recursion is easy but iterative approach is better, there is one iterative version above but it's way too complex than necessary. Here is the best solution in c++ you'll ever find anywhere:

This algorithm runs in O(N) time and needs O(lgN) space.

struct TreeNode
{
    int value;
    TreeNode* left;
    TreeNode* right;
};

bool isBST(TreeNode* root) {
    vector<TreeNode*> stack;
    TreeNode* prev = nullptr;
    while (root || stack.size()) {
        if (root) {
           stack.push_back(root);
           root = root->left;
        } else {
            if (prev && stack.back()->value <= prev->value)
                return false;
            prev = stack.back();
            root = prev->right;                    
            stack.pop_back();
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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This code doesn't seem to detect duplicate values. –  MikeB Jan 31 '13 at 19:10
    
I think it does, can you construct a counter example? –  shuais Feb 8 '13 at 10:06
    
Trivially: a two node tree that has the same integer in "value" of both nodes will still have your isBST() function returning "true". Since you're only returning false when value < value, you'll never detect it. Why do you think that test works to find duplicates? –  MikeB Feb 10 '13 at 16:01
    
I thought duplicates are allowed in BST, but wikipedia seems to be against it. Then you're right, the < should be <=. –  shuais Feb 11 '13 at 5:22
    
Using <= means that no node can have INT_MIN as its value. –  MikeB Feb 11 '13 at 16:15

I wrote a solution to use inorder Traversal BST and check whether the nodes is increasing order for space O(1) AND time O(n). TreeNode predecessor is prev node. I am not sure the solution is right or not. Because the inorder Traversal can not define a whole tree.

public boolean isValidBST(TreeNode root, TreeNode predecessor) {
    boolean left = true, right = true;
    if (root.left != null) {
        left = isValidBST(root.left, predecessor);
    }
    if (!left)
        return false;

    if (predecessor.val > root.val)
        return false;

    predecessor.val = root.val;
    if (root.right != null) {
        right = isValidBST(root.right, predecessor);
    }

    if (!right)
        return false;

    return true;

}
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Following is the Java implementation of BST validation, where we travel the tree in-order DFS and it returns false if we get any number which is greater than last number.

static class BSTValidator {
  private boolean lastNumberInitialized = false;
  private int lastNumber = -1;

  boolean isValidBST(TreeNode node) {
    if (node.left != null && !isValidBST(node.left)) return false;

    // In-order visiting should never see number less than previous
    // in valid BST.
    if (lastNumberInitialized && (lastNumber > node.getData())) return false;
    if (!lastNumberInitialized) lastNumberInitialized = true;

    lastNumber = node.getData();

    if (node.right != null && !isValidBST(node.right)) return false;

    return true;
  }
}
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I got this question in a phone interview recently and struggled with it more than I should have. I was trying to keep track of minimums and maximums in child nodes and I just couldn't wrap my brain around the different cases under the pressure of an interview.

After thinking about it while falling asleep last night, I realized that it is as simple as keeping track of the last node you've visited during an inorder traversal. In Java:

public <T extends Comparable<T>> boolean isBst(TreeNode<T> root) {
    return isBst(root, null);
}

private <T extends Comparable<T>> boolean isBst(TreeNode<T> node, TreeNode<T> prev) {
    if (node == null)
        return true;

    if (isBst(node.left, prev) && (prev == null || prev.compareTo(node) < 0 ))
        return isBst(node.right, node);

    return false;
}
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Iterative solution.

private static boolean checkBst(bst node) {

    Stack<bst> s = new Stack<bst>();
    bst temp;
    while(node!=null){
        s.push(node);
        node=node.left;
    }
    while (!s.isEmpty()){
        node = s.pop();
        System.out.println(node.val);
        temp = node;
        if(node.right!=null){
            node = node.right;
            while(node!=null)
            {
                //Checking if the current value is lesser than the previous value and ancestor.
                if(node.val < temp.val)
                    return false;
                if(!s.isEmpty())
                    if(node.val>s.peek().val)
                        return false;
                s.push(node);
                if(node!=null)
                node=node.left;
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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If an efficient method is needed then it would be best to not use a recursive method. The only tree traversal algorithm that can easily be implemented in a non-recursive manner is the breadth-first search.

For each node you just need to check if the left element is smaller than the current and if the right element is greater than the current. If both conditions are satisfied then you proceed with the traversal, else the binary tree is not a binary search tree.

In the worst-case-scenario you would have a time complexity of O(n) and - depending on the implementation - a space complexity of O(n) or O(2^k) for the k-th level of the tree. Note that 2^k < n.

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This works for duplicates.

// time O(n), space O(logn)
// pseudocode
is-bst(node, min = int.min, max = int.max):
    if node == null:
        return true
    if node.value <= min || max < node.value:
        return false
    return is-bst(node.left, min, node.value)
        && is-bst(node.right, node.value, max)

This works even for int.min and int.max values using Nullable types.

// time O(n), space O(logn)
// pseudocode
is-bst(node, min = null, max = null):
    if node == null:
        return true
    if min != null && node.value <= min
        return false
    if max != null && max < node.value:
        return false
    return is-bst(node.left, min, node.value)
        && is-bst(node.right, node.value, max)
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Here is the iterative solution without using extra space.

Node{
     int value;
     Node right, left
  }

  public boolean ValidateBST(Node root){
    Node currNode = root;
    Node prevNode = null;
    Stack<Node> stack = new Stack<Node>();
    while(true){
        if(currNode != null){
            stack.push(currNode);
            currNode = currNode.left;
            continue;
        }
        if(stack.empty()){
            return;
        }
        currNode = stack.pop();
        if(prevNode != null){
            if(currNode.value < prevNode.value){
                return false;
            }
        }
        prevNode = currNode;
        currNode = currNode.right;
    }
}
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1  
Iterative solution without using extra space? But you're using a stack here and do stack.push()! –  Alexey Frunze May 20 '12 at 4:53
boolean isBST(Node root) {
    if (root == null) { return true; }
    return (isBST(root.left) && (isBST(root.right) && (root.left == null || root.left.data <= root.data) && (root.right == null || root.right.data > root.data));
}
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This is wrong. See Scott's Answer. –  st0le May 8 '12 at 4:27

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