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What is the purpose of anonymous { } blocks in C style languages (C, C++, C#)

Example -



void function()
{

  {
    int i = 0;
    i = i + 1;
  }

  {
    int k = 0;
    k = k + 1;
  }

}

Edit - Thanks for all of the excellent answers!

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For completeness, you can do this in Java too. –  Drew Noakes Jun 8 '10 at 6:20
    
Locking with scope-lock classes: stackoverflow.com/questions/500006/… –  Valentin Heinitz Nov 9 '10 at 13:05

16 Answers 16

up vote 52 down vote accepted

It limits the scope of variables to the block inside the { }.

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1  
+1 for a short and accurate answer. –  René Nyffenegger May 5 '11 at 8:59

Brackets designate an area of scope - anything declared within the brackets is invisible outside of them.

Furthermore, in C++ an object allocated on the stack (e.g. without the use of 'new') will be destructed when it goes out of scope.

In some cases it can also be a way to highlight a particular piece of a function that the author feels is worthy of attention for people looking at the source. Whether this is a good use or not is debatable, but I have seen it done.

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They are often useful for RAII purposes, which means that a given resource will be released when the object goes out of scope. For example:

void function()
{
    {
        std::ofstream out( "file.txt" );
        out << "some data\n";
    }
    // You can be sure that "out" is closed here
}
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{ ... } opens up a new scope

In C++, you can use them like this:

void function() {
    // ...
    {
        // lock some mutex.
        mutex_locker lock(m_mutex);
        // ...
    }
    // ...
}

Once control goes out of the block, the mutex locker is destroyed. And in its destructor, it would automatically unlock the mutex that it's connected to. That's very often done, and is called RAII (resource acquisition is initialization) and also SBRM (scope bound resource management). Another common application is to allocate memory, and then in the destructor free that memory again.

Another purpose is to do several similar things:

void function() {
    // set up timer A
    {
        int config = get_config(TIMER_A);
        // ... 
    } 

    // set up timer B
    {
        int config = get_config(TIMER_B);
        // ...
    } 
}

It will keep things separate so one can easily find out the different building blocks. You may use variables having the same name, like the code does above, because they are not visible outside their scope, thus they do not conflict with each other.

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Another common use is with OpenGL's glPushMatrix() and glPopMatrix() functions to create logical blocks relating to the matrix stack:

glPushMatrix();
{
    glTranslate(...);
    glPushMatrix();
    {
        glRotate(...);
        // draw some stuff
    }
    glPopMatrix();
    // maybe draw some more stuff
}
glPopMatrix();
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That seems like a good idea for C/C++. In C#, you'd do the same thing via the using construct, which would avoid forgetting to pop the matrix at the end, or leaving the stack messed up if an exception is raised. –  Drew Noakes Jun 8 '10 at 6:22
class ExpensiveObject {
public:
    ExpensiveObject() {
        // acquire a resource
    }
    ~ExpensiveObject() {
        // release the resource
    }
}

int main() {
    // some initial processing
    {
        ExpensiveObject obj;
        // do some expensive stuff with the obj
    } // don't worry, the variable's scope ended, so the destructor was called, and the resources were released
    // some final processing
}
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By creating a new scope they can be used to define local variables in a switch statement.

e.g.

switch (i)
{
    case 0 :
        int j = 0;   // error!
        break;

vs.

switch (i)
{
    case 0 :
    {
        int j = 0;   // ok!
    }
    break;
share|improve this answer
    
@Ferrucio: Not only in switch statements. In C the variables should be defined in a scope before any instruction. So if you have a large function and need a temporary variable for a calculation, you could open a new scope anywhere in the function and define your temp variable. –  Valentin Heinitz Nov 9 '10 at 12:50
    
@Valentin - that was true for K&R C and C89, but I think C99 allows you to declare and initialize variables as you need them (like C++) so you don't need to create scopes just for that. However, you still need to create a scope within a switch statement or the compiler may complain that the variable's initialization is skipped by one or more of the cases. –  Ferruccio Nov 9 '10 at 13:17

You are doing two things.

  1. You are forcing a scope restriction on the variables in that block.
  2. You are enabling sibling code blocks to use the same variable names.
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2 follows implicitly from 1 –  Nathan Fellman Feb 1 '09 at 14:26

They're very often used for scoping variables, so that variables are local to an arbitrary block defined by the braces. In your example, the variables i and k aren't accessible outside of their enclosing braces so they can't be modified in any sneaky ways, and that those variable names can be re-used elsewhere in your code. Another benefit to using braces to create local scope like this is that in languages with garbage collection, the garbage collector knows that it's safe to clean up out-of-scope variables. That's not available in C/C++, but I believe that it should be in C#.

One simple way to think about it is that the braces define an atomic piece of code, kind of like a namespace, function or method, but without having to actually create a namespace, function or method.

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As far as I understand, they are simply for scoping. They allow you to reuse variable names in the parent/sibling scopes, which can be useful from time to time.

EDIT: This question has in fact been answered on another Stack Overflow question. Hope that helps.

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As the previous posters mentioned, it limits the use of a variable to the scope in which it is declared.

In garbage collected languages such as C# and Java, it also allows the garbage collector to reclaim memory used by any variables used within the scope (although setting the variables to null would have the same effect).

{
    int[] myArray = new int[1000];
    ... // Do some work
}
// The garbage collector can now reclaim the memory used by myArray
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Actually, depending on the GC implementation, the JIT should already know that there are no more reads on that variable, and hence it is already eligible for collection. –  Marc Gravell Feb 1 '09 at 8:59

It's about the scope, it refers to the visibility of variables and methods in one part of a program to another part of that program, consider this example:

int a=25;
int b=30;
{ //at this point, a=25, b=30
     a*=2; //a=50, b=30
     b /= 2; //a=50,b=15
     int a = b*b; //a=225,b=15  <--- this new a it's
                  //                 declared on the inner scope
}
//a = 50, b = 15
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Scoping of course. (Has that horse been beaten to death yet?)

But if you look at the language definition, you see patterns like:

  • if ( expression )   statement
  • if ( expression )   statement   else   statement
  • switch ( expression )   statement
  • while ( expression )   statement
  • do   statement   while ( expression ) ;

It simplifies the language syntax that compound-statement is just one of several possible statement's.


compound-statement:   { statement-listopt }

statement-list:

  • statement
  • statement-list   statement

statement:

  • labeled-statement
  • expression-statement
  • compound-statement
  • selection-statement
  • iteration-statement
  • jump-statement
  • declaration-statement
  • try-block
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If you are limited to ANSI C, then they could be used to declare variables closer to where you use them:

int main() {
    /* Blah blah blah. */
    {
        int i;
        for (i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
        }
    }
}

Not neccessary with a modern C compiler though.

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Yes, and sometimes it's merely a visual thing. Also worth noting that anything inside the braces is considered "a statement" for those syntax constructs that "accept only a single statement". –  gbarry Feb 1 '09 at 4:17
    
You mean not necessary in C++, right? –  Valentin Heinitz Nov 9 '10 at 12:52
    
@Valentin: Yes, in C++ you are allowed to declare variables anywhere, and not just at the top of a block. –  Bernard Nov 11 '10 at 7:30

I use it for blocks that need temporal variables.

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do you mean temporary? –  Nathan Fellman Feb 1 '09 at 14:27
    
Yes, sorry my english level is low :( Thanks! –  Jesus Fernandez Feb 1 '09 at 21:00

A useful use-cas ihmo is defining critical sections in C++. e.g.:

int MyClass::foo()
{    
   // stuff uncritical for multithreading
   ...
   {
      someKindOfScopeLock lock(&mutexForThisCriticalResource);
      // stuff critical for multithreading!
   }
   // stuff uncritical for multithreading
   ...    
}

using anonymous scope there is no need calling lock/unlock of a mutex or a semaphore explicitly.

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