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I am somewhat confused by what happens when you call strtok on a char pointer in C. I know that it modifies the contents of the string, so if I call strtok on a variable named 'line', its content will change. Assume I follow the bellow approach:

void function myFunc(char* line) {

    // get a pointer to the original memory block
    char* garbageLine = line;

    // Do some work
    // Call strtok on 'line' multiple times until it returns NULL
    // Do more work

    free(garbageLine);
}

Further assume that 'line' is malloced before it is passed to myFunc. Am I supposed to free the original string after using strtok or does it do the job for us? Also, what happens if 'line' is not malloced and I attempt to use the function above? Is it safer to do the following instead? (Assume the programmer won't call free if he knows the line is not malloced)

Invocation

char* garbageLine = line;
myFunc(line);
free(garbageLine);

Function definition

void function myFunc(char* line) {
    // Do some work
    // Call strtok on 'line' multiple times until it returns NULL
    // Do more work
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

strtok() will not free anything, as it has no knowledge of where the string is stored. It could be on the stack or the heap, it doesn't know or care! :)

Is it safer to do the following instead?

Your second example is much better, as it simplifies myFunc(), and makes it useful in more situations as the function does not need to know where the string is allocated. By removing the call to free() from myFunc() you are able to use the function to parse strings from the stack or the heap. The caller allocates the memory, the caller frees the memory!

Further reading: strtok()

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+1 for recommending 'caller frees memory' :-) –  Steve Lazaridis Feb 15 '11 at 6:10
    
Note that the second approach can be simplified to myFunc(line); free(line); - the temporary is unnecessary since the pointer line is passed by value to myFunc(). –  caf Feb 15 '11 at 7:45
    
@caf You're assuming, of course, that the OP actually malloced line, but that's not evident from the code. Given the evident confusion about memory allocation and deallocation, the assumption may not be warranted. –  Jim Balter Feb 15 '11 at 10:39

In the comment in your question, you say that you "Call strtok on 'line' multiple times until it returns NULL". This sounds as if you may be using strtok incorrectly. The first time you call it, you should call it with 'line' as an argument; on subsequent calls, you should pass it NULL. Take the following as an example:

void function myFunc(char* line) {
  char *segment; // This will point at each delimited substring in turn.

  segment = strtok(line, " ");

  // Do something with segment.

  segment = strtok(NULL, " ");

  // Do something with the new segment.

  free(line);
}

As DrTwox said, though, your second example is better - 'line' should be freed by the same context that malloced it (or not), so the call to free() doesn't belong in this function. And you're better off looping it - something like:

void function myFunc(char* line) {
  char *segment;

  segment = strtok(line, " ");

  while (segment != NULL) {
    // Do something with segment.

    segment = strtok(NULL, " ");
  }
}

Invocation is like this:

char *line = malloc(20*sizeof(char));

// Check that malloc succeeded here.
// Put some data into 'line'.

myFunc(line);

free(line);

// No 'garbageLine' required.

The way that strtok works is a little complex to explain, but you've got the important parts - it doesn't allocate or free any memory. Instead, it works by modifying the string you passed to it.

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+1 for mentioning that strtok(LINE, "<token>") doesn't work unless all subsequent calls to strtok receive NULL as an argument: strtok(NULL, "<token>"); –  Alexej Magura Mar 22 at 22:41

What does this have to do with strtok()? If you allocate memory, you need to free it. Where your application decides to allocate and free the memory is up to you. But if you pass the memory to strtok(), that makes no difference as far as if or when the memory is allocated or freed.

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Is the way I deallocate memory in both of those approaches correct? All I am wondering is if strtok implicitly deallocotes memory. Keep in mind that I am not an expert in the language. –  user246392 Feb 15 '11 at 5:54
    
@user246392: As I said in my answer, calling strtok() has no effect whatsoever on allocated memory. It does not allocate or free any memory. It is not relevant to the question of allocating or freeing memory. Often, it makes sense to free memory from the same routine that allocates it, but if that doesn't fit your app, all that really matters is that it gets freed. –  Jonathan Wood Feb 15 '11 at 6:18
    
@user246392 It's not possible to determine whether you are deallocating memory correctly because we have no way of knowing how you allocated it. I can say though that you are almost certainly doing it incorrectly. –  Jim Balter Feb 15 '11 at 9:15

strtok no more frees memory than strlen does. Why would you expect it to? What memory would it free? Perhaps you think strtok needs to free memory because it stores a NUL, but the content of memory is irrelevant. When you allocate memory, the allocator tracks the size of the block you allocated, and the entire block is freed when you free it.

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As long as you only use a "char*" type, it will be impossible to do any string manipulation 100% safely due to buffer overflows.

As far as memory leaks are concerned; if you allocate it, the best practice is to delete it in the same block (if possible). This means that if you provide a strtok implementation, it should delete any memory it allocates internally, but not delete any memory passed to the method.

The reasons are many-fold, but basically there's no guarantee that someone else who might be using your method would have access to it's source code, so there's little way that they would reasonable be ready to watch the memory they allocated disappear (causing a segmentation fault in their part of the code).

To do a "safe" non-buffer overflow string manipulation, you need to also have a maxium count value. For example, strncpy(...) takes a "maximum number of characters" parameter. This prevents certain kinds of attacks where the memory "downstream" of a string's memory allocation can be filled up by data which is later interpreted as code by some other part of the program.

This means that your myFunc(char* line) needs to have a signature myfunc(char* line, int max_chars) and all of your subsequent operations should be guaranteed max_Chars + 1 amount of memory to work with. The plus one is to hold the terminating null, which might not be present. Internally, you need to make sure that all operations, like strcpy operate only on the first max_chars (strncpy does this).

This means you will eventually always favor the "n" (number of chars) version of a string manipulator for buffer overflow safety. Couple that with a strong "deallocate in the block you allocate" practice and you'll avoid 90% of most string-related programming errors.

Sometimes you will want to store an allocated string for later (perhaps in a map). With cases like those, you need to take care to clear the map before leaving the program, or at least take some other measure to make sure the map doesn't hold unused memory longer than appropriate.

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