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Ok, it's 1 a.m., I suck at coding javascript, and I can't seem to find a clear solution anywhere.

This is essentially what I have:

$('a.button').click(function(){
    if (condition == 'true'){
        function1(someVariable);
        function2(someOtherVariable);
    }
    else {
        doThis(someVariable);
    }
});

How can I ensure that "function2" is called only after "function1" has completed?

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12  
is function1 performing an async operation? –  LiraNuna Feb 15 '11 at 6:10
3  
Yads, if function1 contains animations, function2 will be executed while function1's animations are still happening. How would you make function2 wait until everything started in function1 is completely done? –  trusktr Mar 5 '11 at 21:45
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5 Answers

up vote 37 down vote accepted

Specify an anonymous callback, and make function1 accept it:

$('a.button').click(function(){
    if (condition == 'true'){
        function1(someVariable, function() {
          function2(someOtherVariable);
        });
    }
    else {
        doThis(someVariable);
    }
});


function function1(param, callback) {
  ...do stuff
  callback();
} 
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5  
+1 but if he's using 1.5 he can just use the new Deferreds pattern –  philwinkle Feb 15 '11 at 6:15
    
@philwinkle Cool, I learned something tonight –  Mike Robinson Feb 15 '11 at 6:26
    
Glad to help spread the jQuery lovin' –  philwinkle Feb 15 '11 at 6:27
4  
This answer isn't the solution. Here's proof it doesn't work: jsfiddle.net/trusktr/M2h6e –  trusktr Mar 19 '11 at 8:20
2  
@trusktr Wish I could -1 your comment. Answer is perfectly valid. –  GoodSp33d Jun 30 '13 at 7:43
show 7 more comments

If you're using jQuery 1.5 you can use the new Deferreds pattern:

$('a.button').click(function(){
    if(condition == 'true'){
        $.when(function1()).then(function2());
    }
    else {
        doThis(someVariable);
    }
});

Edit: Updated blog link:

Rebecca Murphy had a great write-up on this here: http://rmurphey.com/blog/2010/12/25/deferreds-coming-to-jquery/

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The whole point of deferreds is to delay execution in case something can happen asynchronously. See the very first example in the documentation for $.when() here api.jquery.com/jQuery.when and you'll understand that in that use case, it cannot logically process ajaxArgs until the $.ajax() call returns successful. –  philwinkle Feb 15 '11 at 6:21
2  
But is that a working example? What is being deferred? You're executing function1 and function2 immediately. (I'm not the original commenter.) –  user113716 Feb 15 '11 at 6:22
    
As we have no idea what function1() and function2() do, then no, it's pseudo-code. $.when() expects a defferred object back... $.ajax() in 1.5 hands it back already but you can also just as easily use something to the effect of Rebecca's suggestion of var dfd = new $.Deferred(); and return that. –  philwinkle Feb 15 '11 at 6:24
3  
That's not working at all for me. function1 and function2 both get executed at exactly the same time (as observable by the human eye). Here's the tiny example: jsfiddle.net/trusktr/M2h6e –  trusktr Mar 19 '11 at 8:17
1  
Rebecca Murphy's write up was before Defferds were introduced to jQuery and it uses examples based on how the writer thinks it will be implemented. Please visit jQuery's site to see how to actually use this feature: api.jquery.com/jQuery.Deferred –  williamcwilliams Mar 13 at 16:45
show 4 more comments

Or you can trigger a custom event when one function completes, then bind it to the document:

function a() {
    // first function code here
    $(document).trigger('function_a_complete');
}

function b() {
    // second function code here
}

$(document).bind('function_a_complete', b);

Using this method, function 'b' can only execute AFTER function 'a', as the trigger only exists when function a is finished executing.

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"As of jQuery 1.7, the .on() method is the preferred method for attaching event handlers to a document." api.jquery.com/bind –  Freelancer Dec 19 '13 at 9:41
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Try this :

function method1(){
   // some code

}

function method2(){
   // some code
}

$.ajax({
   url:method1(),
   success:function(){
   method2();
}
})
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This depends on what function1 is doing.

If function1 is doing some simple synchrounous javascript, like updating a div value or something, then function2 will fire after function1 has completed.

If function1 is making an asynchronous call, such as an AJAX call, you will need to create a "callback" method (most ajax API's have a callback function parameter). Then call function2 in the callback. eg:

function1()
{
  new AjaxCall(ajaxOptions, MyCallback);
}

function MyCallback(result)
{
  function2(result);
}
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