Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it advisable to use Java Collections List in the cases when you know the size of the list before hand and you can also use array there? Are there any performance drawbacks?

Can a list be initialised with elements in a single statement like an array (list of all elements separated by commas) ?

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is it advisable to use Java Collections List in the cases when you know the size of the list before hand and you can also use array there ?

In some (probably most) circumstances yes, it is definitely advisable to use collections anyway, in some circumstances it is not advisable.

On the pro side:

  • If you use an List instead of an array, your code can use methods like contains, insert, remove and so on.
  • A lot of library classes expect collection-typed arguments.
  • You don't need to worry that the next version of the code may require a more dynamically sized array ... which would make an initial array-based approach a liability.

On the con side:

  • Collections are a bit slower, and more so if the base type of your array is a primitive type.
  • Collections do take more memory, especially if the base type of your array is a primitive type.

But performance is rarely a critical issue, and in many cases the performance difference is not relevant to the big picture.

And in practice, there is often a cost in performance and/or code complexity involved in working out what the array's size should be. (Consider the hypothetical case where you used a char[] to hold the concatenation of a series. You can work out how big the array needs to be; e.g. by adding up the component string sizes. But it is messy!)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed answer! –  user01 Feb 15 '11 at 11:51

Collections/lists are more flexible and provide more utility methods. For most situations, any performance overhead is negligible.

And for this single statement initialization, use:

Arrays.asList(yourArray);

From the docs:

Returns a fixed-size list backed by the specified array. (Changes to the returned list "write through" to the array.) This method acts as bridge between array-based and collection-based APIs, in combination with Collection.toArray. The returned list is serializable and implements RandomAccess.

My guess is that this is the most performance-wise way to convert to a list, but I may be wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
In the above single statement initialization step, you are going to create space for the array as well as for the list in the heap !? So is it a good way to initialize ?? –  user01 Feb 15 '11 at 11:42
2  
@Marcos The array is already created, it is only going to create a List and point to the array as its underlying data (that what means to be 'backed by the specified array'). This avoids creating a standard list and adding every object of the array to the list, which will then have its own structure to keep the added data. There is (most likely) some resource/time saving using the Arrays.asList() way, so if you can use it, do it. –  mdrg Feb 15 '11 at 11:50
    
As an additional note, when using any of this 'data backing methods', it's usually better to never let any reference pointing to the backed data, as modifications to the array will modify the list and vice versa. –  mdrg Feb 15 '11 at 11:53
    
Thank you mdrg!! –  user01 Feb 15 '11 at 11:55

1) a Collection is the most basic type and only implies there is a collection of objects. If there is no order or duplication use java.util.Set, if there is possible duplication and ordering use java.util.List, is there is ordering but no duplication use java.util.SortedSet

2) Curly brackets to instantiate an Array, Arrays.asList() plus generics for the type inference

List<String> myStrings = Arrays.asList(new String[]{"one", "two", "three"});

There is also a trick using anonymous types but personally I'm not a big fan:

List<String> myStrings = new ArrayList<String>(){
// this is the inside of an anonymouse class
{
    // this is the inside of an instance block in the anonymous class
    this.add("one");
    this.add("two");
    this.add("three");
}};
share|improve this answer
    
In fact, a bit more basic than Collection would be Iterable - this may be used for collections where the size is not known, and the client would have to do contains-checks and similar himself. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 15 '11 at 15:16
1  
That's the so-called double brace initialization trick. What it does is create a new anonymous subclass of ArrayList with an instance initializer block in which you add elements to the list. –  Jesper Feb 21 '11 at 18:02
    
and I'm fine if others want to use it, but it is possible that an unexpected anonymous type could cause issues in some code eg a weak equals contract that uses "class name".equals(o.getClass().getName()) –  David O'Meara Feb 22 '11 at 0:17

Yes, it is advisable.

Some of the various list constructors (like ArrayList) even take arguments so you can "pre-allocate" sufficient backing storage, alleviating the need for the list to "grow" to the proper size as you add elements.

share|improve this answer

Is it advisable to use Java Collections List in the cases when you know the size of the list before hand and you can also use array there ? Performance drawbacks ???

If an array is enough, then use an array. Just to keep things simple. You may even get a slightly better performance out of it. Keep in mind that if you...

  • ever need to pass the resulting array to a method that takes a Collection, or
  • if you ever need to work with List-methods such as .contains, .lastIndexOf, or what not, or
  • if you need to use Collections methods, such as reverse...

then may just as well go for the Collection/List classes from the beginning.

How can a list be initialised with elements in a single statement like an array = {list of all elements separated by commas} ?

You can do

List<String> list = Arrays.asList("foo", "bar");

or

List<String> arrayList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList("foo", "bar"));

or

List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>() {{ add("foo"); add("bar"); }};
share|improve this answer
    
there is no Collections.asList(String...) in JSE but now that I see it, I wish there were. –  David O'Meara Feb 15 '11 at 10:42
    
Yeah, I realized that and updated :) –  aioobe Feb 15 '11 at 10:43
    
Thanks for the detailed answer! –  user01 Feb 15 '11 at 11:51

There are different things to consider: Is the type of the array known? Who accesses the array? There are several issues with arrays, e.g.:

  • you can not create generic arrays
  • arrays are covariant: if A extends B -> A[] extends B[], which can lead to ArrayStoreExceptions
  • you cannot make the fields of an array immutable
  • ...

Also see, item 25 "Prefer lists to arrays" of the Effective Java book.

That said, sometimes arrays are convenient, e.g. the new Object... parameter syntax.

How can a list be initialised with elements in a single statement like an array = {list of all elements separated by commas} ?

Arrays.asList(): http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html#asList%28T...%29

share|improve this answer

Is it advisable to use Java Collections List in the cases when you know the size of the list before hand and you can also use array there ? Performance drawbacks ?

It can be perfectly acceptable to use a List instead of an array, even if you know the size before hand.

How can a list be initialised with elements in a single statement like an array = {list of all elements separated by commas} ?

See Arrays.asList().

share|improve this answer
1  
unmodifiable means more than the size never changes, it also means that the elements can not be changed - while for an array you can change them. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 15 '11 at 15:14
    
True - thank you. –  duffymo Feb 15 '11 at 18:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.