Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm using quasi the module approach "From a Table - Using Locals Internally" as described on this page.

local M = {}

-- private
local x = 1
local function baz() print 'test' end

local function foo() print("foo", x) end
M.foo = foo

local function bar()
  foo()
  baz()
  print "bar"
end
M.bar = bar

return M

However, I don't add functions etc. to the module table after the definition of the function. Instead I do it at the bottom of the file.

local x = 1
local function baz() print 'test' end

local function foo() print("foo", x) end

local function bar()
  foo()
  baz()
  print "bar"
end

local M = {
  bar = bar,
  foo = foo,
}
return M

As can clearly be seen M is a local variable. I wondered if a change to

local x = 1
local function baz() print 'test' end

local function foo() print("foo", x) end

local function bar()
  foo()
  baz()
  print "bar"
end

return {
  bar = bar,
  foo = foo,
}

is equivalent. I suppose the returned table is global but afaik if I'd use this module in another like

local foo = require 'foomodule'

it would not make a difference (performancewise) because I bind the local variable foo to the returned table.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Short version: All those snippets of code are equivalent.

Apparently the creation of a global module table is up to the user writing a module. require"foomodule" correctly loads the module, but it does not create the foomoduletable in the globals table _G. It does create a module table in package.loaded.

So basically it's your choice:

  1. Generate the global module table in your module, and just require "foomodule" will create the global foomodule table
  2. Leave the decision up to the user: do as in the third code snippet, and just return an unnamed table.

In my opinion, option 2 is to preferred as it doesn't accidentally ruin a users table which has the same name as your module, or at least he'll know he's erasing his table if he sees foo = require'...'. However it seems most modules use the first approach, and just hope this problem does not occur.

As for the locals, it's simple, a local is a local ;). So if you declare a local it's only available in the scope it is declared in (see section 2.6: Visibility in the Reference Manual).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.