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I have a union as follows:

typedef unsigned long GT_U32;
typedef unsigned short GT_U16;
typedef unsigned char GT_U8;

typedef union
{
    GT_U8   c[8];
    GT_U16  s[4];
    GT_U32  l[2];
} GT_U64;

I want to cast this union into the following:

typedef unsigned long long int UINT64;

The casting function I wrote is as follows:

UINT64 gtu64_to_uint64_cast(GT_U64 number_u)
{
    UINT64 casted_number = 0;

    casted_number = number_u.l[0];
    casted_number = casted_number << 32;
    casted_number = casted_number | number_u.l[1];

    return casted_number;
}

This function is using the l member to perform the shifting and bitwise or. What will happen if the s or c members of the union are used to set its values?

I am not sure if this function will always cast the values correctly. I suspect it has something to do with the byte ordering of long and short. Can any body help?

Full example program is listed below.

#include <stdio.h>

typedef unsigned long GT_U32;
typedef unsigned short GT_U16;
typedef unsigned char GT_U8;

typedef union
{
    GT_U8   c[8];
    GT_U16  s[4];
    GT_U32  l[2];
} GT_U64;

typedef unsigned long long int UINT64;

UINT64 gtu64_to_uint64_cast(GT_U64 number_u)
{
    UINT64 casted_number = 0;

    casted_number = number_u.l[0];
    casted_number = casted_number << 32;
    casted_number = casted_number | number_u.l[1];

    return casted_number;
}

int main()
{
    UINT64 left;
    GT_U64 right;

    right.s[0] = 0x00;
    right.s[1] = 0x00;
    right.s[2] = 0x00;
    right.s[3] = 0x01;
    left = gtu64_to_uint64_cast(right);

    printf ("%llu\n", left);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
This one if accessing out side the mem areya of your array.. "right.l[3] = 0x01;" –  eaanon01 Feb 15 '11 at 13:44
    
code is wrong, there is no l[3]. it should be s, I think. –  Serkan Feb 15 '11 at 13:48
    
corrected that. –  Imran S. Feb 15 '11 at 13:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's really ugly and implementation-dependent - just use memcpy, e.g.

UINT64 gtu64_to_uint64_cast(GT_U64 number_u)
{
    UINT64 casted_number;

    assert(sizeof(casted_number) == sizeof(number_u));

    memcpy(&casted_number, &number_u, sizeof(number_u));

    return casted_number;
}
share|improve this answer
    
memcpy() is equally ugly and implementation-dependant. A struct/union may have padding bytes anywhere inside it. I don't see how an assert() for padding is better/worse than an assert() for endianess. –  Lundin Feb 15 '11 at 13:54
    
@Lundin: if there are any padding/alignment issues with the union then all bets are off anyway - casting a union to a 64 bit int is never going to be completely reliable. The advantage of using the above solution is that it at least does not suffer endianness problems and it is somewhat future-proof. Can you suggest a better solution ? –  Paul R Feb 15 '11 at 13:58

First of all, please use the typedefs from "stdint.h" for such a purpose. You have plenty of assumptions of what the width of integer types would be, don't do that.

What will happen if the s or c members of the union are used to set its values?

Reading a member of a union that has been written to through another member may cause undefined behavior if there are padding bytes or padding bits. The only exception from that is unsigned char that may always be used to access the individual bytes. So access through c is fine. Access through s may (in very unlikely circumstances) cause undefined behavior.

And there is no such thing like a "correct" cast in your case. It simply depends on how you want to interpret an array of small numbers as one big number. One possible interpretation for that task is the one you gave.

share|improve this answer
    
This is among the lines of what I was thinking as well. Would there be any portability advantage of doing the copy through the c member of the union? for(i=0; i<8; i++) casted_number |= number_u.c[i] << i*8; This seems safe both endian-wise and padding-wise. –  Lundin Feb 15 '11 at 15:47
1  
@Lundin, yes I think so. You'd always have the same interpretation of the individual bytes. You could hope that the for-loop could be unrolled by any decent compiler. But be careful as you have written it, it is not completely correct. number_u.c[i] is only promoted to unsigned int for the evaluation of the RHS. So you'd have to do ((uint64_t)number_u.c[i]) to be sure that it doesn't overflow with the shift. If you detect this to be a performance bottleneck, you could also replace the for-loop by one monster expression where you directly `|' the 8 parts. –  Jens Gustedt Feb 15 '11 at 16:53
    
Ah of course, I didn't think of the overflow. I'll post this as an answer to the original question below. –  Lundin Feb 16 '11 at 12:31

This code should work independantly of padding, endianess, union accessing and implicit integer promotions.

uint64_t gtu64_to_uint64_cast (const GT_U64* number_u)
{
    uint64_t casted_number = 0;
    uint8_t  i;


    for(i=0; i<8; i++)
    {
      casted_number |= (uint64_t) number_u->c[i] << i*8U;
    }

    return casted_number;
}
share|improve this answer

If you can't change the declaration of the union to include an explicit 64-bit field, perhaps you can just wrap it? Like this:

UINT64 convert(const GT_U64 *value)
{
  union {
    GT_U64 in;
    UINT64 out;
  } tmp;

  tmp.in = *value;
  return tmp.out;
}

This does violate the rule that says you can only read from the union member last written to, so maybe it'll set your hair on fire. I think it will be quite safe though, don't see a case where a union like this would include padding but of course I could be wrong.

I mainly wanted to include this since just because you can't change the declaration of the "input" union doesn't mean you can't do almost the same thing by wrapping it.

share|improve this answer

Probably an easier way to cast is to use union with a long long member:

typedef unsigned long long int UINT64;
typedef unsigned long GT_U32;
typedef unsigned short GT_U16;
typedef unsigned char GT_U8;

typedef union
{
    GT_U8   c[8];
    GT_U16  s[4];
    GT_U32  l[2];
    UINT64 ll;
} GT_U64;

Then, simply accessing ll will get the 64-bit value without having to do an explicit cast. You will need to tell your compiler to use one-byte struct packing.

share|improve this answer
    
Can't control the union. Otherwise the cast may not be required in the first place. –  Imran S. Feb 15 '11 at 13:56

You don't specify what "cast the values correctly" means.

This code will cast in the simplest possible way, but it'll give different results depending on your systems endianness.

UINT64 gtu64_to_uint64_cast(GT_U64 number_u) {
  assert(sizeof(UINT64) == sizeof(GT_U64));
  return *(UINT64 *) &number_u;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is an alignment violation on at least two architectures, and conversely must be undefined, or at least implementation-defined, behavior. Use memcpy instead of dereferencing a potentially unaligned pointer. –  user611775 Feb 15 '11 at 14:16
    
@user611775 How could a union be allocated on an unaligned address by the compiler? It doesn't make sense to me. –  Lundin Feb 15 '11 at 15:51

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