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I want to do something incredible simple: I want to create one boxplot for an complete dataframe. Yet, searching for ‘combined boxplot’ and related terms didn’t turn up any suggestions. If I overlooked an obvious way, let me know.

I have the following data:

> theData
     X20.7    X21.7    X22.7    X23.7    X24.7    X25.7    X26.7    X27.7    X28.7    X29.7    X30.7    X31.7    X32.7    X33.7    X34.7    X35.7
1 99.64920 99.49319 99.49319 99.49319 99.49319 99.49319 99.80837 99.29348 99.29348 99.29348 99.29348 99.29348 99.29348 99.46376 99.46376 99.51554
2 98.76469 98.60867 98.60867 98.60867 98.60867 98.60867 99.41553 98.40896 98.40896 98.40896 98.40896 98.40896 98.40896 98.74975 98.74975 98.54527
3 98.37824 98.22222 98.22222 98.22222 98.22222 98.22222 98.70900 98.13767 98.13767 98.13767 98.13767 98.13767 98.13767 98.47846 98.47846 98.01791
4 98.11356 97.95754 97.95754 97.95754 97.95754 97.95754 97.82447 97.93003 97.93003 97.93003 97.93003 97.93003 97.93003 98.27083 98.27083 97.81027
5 97.80027 97.64424 97.64424 97.64424 97.64424 97.48632 97.43801 97.40158 97.40158 97.40158 97.40158 97.40158 97.40158 97.74239 97.74239 97.28181
6 97.47825 97.32222 97.32222 97.32222 97.43795 97.12131 97.17333 97.03658 97.10158 97.10158 97.10158 97.10158 97.10158 97.44239 97.44239 96.98180
> dput(theData)
structure(list(X20.7 = c(99.6492, 98.7646913866934, 98.3782376564915, 
98.1135635544627, 97.8002672890352, 97.4782549804011), X21.7 = c(99.4931928571429, 
98.6086741582754, 98.2222160140822, 97.9575388921788, 97.6442390541023, 
97.3222230681959), X22.7 = c(99.4931928571429, 98.6086741582754, 
98.2222160140822, 97.9575388921788, 97.6442390541023, 97.3222230681959
), X23.7 = c(99.4931928571429, 98.6086741582754, 98.2222160140822, 
97.9575388921788, 97.6442390541023, 97.3222230681959), X24.7 = c(99.4931928571429, 
98.6086741582754, 98.2222160140822, 97.9575388921788, 97.6442390541023, 
97.437947563131), X25.7 = c(99.4931928571429, 98.6086741582754, 
98.2222160140822, 97.9575388921788, 97.4863155584865, 97.121313307238
), X26.7 = c(99.8083714285714, 99.415530164398, 98.7090041774867, 
97.8244717838903, 97.4380076185552, 97.173326388931), X27.7 = c(99.2934828571429, 
98.4089615689001, 98.1376722694449, 97.9300324124538, 97.401583100132, 
97.03657716757), X28.7 = c(99.2934828571429, 98.4089615689001, 
98.1376722694449, 97.9300324124538, 97.401583100132, 97.1015782240536
), X29.7 = c(99.2934828571429, 98.4089615689001, 98.1376722694449, 
97.9300324124538, 97.401583100132, 97.1015782240536), X30.7 = c(99.2934828571429, 
98.4089615689001, 98.1376722694449, 97.9300324124538, 97.401583100132, 
97.1015782240536), X31.7 = c(99.2934828571429, 98.4089615689001, 
98.1376722694449, 97.9300324124538, 97.401583100132, 97.1015782240536
), X32.7 = c(99.2934828571429, 98.4089615689001, 98.1376722694449, 
97.9300324124538, 97.401583100132, 97.1015782240536), X33.7 = c(99.4637585714286, 
98.7497473555799, 98.478463763926, 98.2708282766442, 97.7423900760775, 
97.4423915096353), X34.7 = c(99.4637585714286, 98.7497473555799, 
98.478463763926, 98.2708282766442, 97.7423900760775, 97.4423915096353
), X35.7 = c(99.5155421428571, 98.5452656069643, 98.0179127183643, 
97.81026932055, 97.2818110000344, 96.9818010094329)), .Names = c("X20.7", 
"X21.7", "X22.7", "X23.7", "X24.7", "X25.7", "X26.7", "X27.7", 
"X28.7", "X29.7", "X30.7", "X31.7", "X32.7", "X33.7", "X34.7", 
"X35.7"), row.names = c(NA, 6L), class = "data.frame")

I want all this data summarized in one boxplot, yet, when I try to plot an boxplot (i.e. boxplot(theData)) R automatically makes groups based on the column names.

I also tried to put the complete data frame in an vector, however, because my (complete) data set also contains NA values, I didn’t succeed in this. So far, I have the following function to try to make an vector of the dataframe so that this can be plotted in a boxplot:

for(i in 1:ncol(allTheData)) {
        tmpData <- allTheData[,i]
        for(j in 1:length(tmpData)){
            if(!is.na(j)){
                tmpVector <- c(tmpVector, j)
            }
        }
    }

However, I think I’m overcomplicating this problem, and I’m doubtful if such an loop construction will benefit the performance of R.

So, how can I make an boxplot which consists of one boxplot for an complete data frame? So, that I don't get an boxplot which consists of X20.7 through X35.7, but gives one "Overall" boxplot?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try something like this

boxplot(unlist(theData))
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 you beated me to it. –  Joris Meys Feb 15 '11 at 14:14
    
Thanks gd047, that worked! I did look into unlist, but didn't realize, because of the 'dirty' names unlist gives each value, that I could be used for the boxplot. Thanks again, a very simple and effective solution. –  Jura25 Feb 15 '11 at 14:14
    
+1. No need to load reshape for this problem if you are using base graphics. If using ggplot2, then reshape would already be loaded up, but this is more straight forward for the OP's question. –  Chase Feb 15 '11 at 14:16

Jura,

How about using the melt function in reshape to convert your data to "long" format and then use boxplot on that? Assuming your data is in an object named df:

> library(reshape)
> df.m <- melt(df)
Using  as id variables
> head(df.m)
  variable    value
1    X20.7 99.64920
2    X20.7 98.76469
3    X20.7 98.37824
4    X20.7 98.11356
5    X20.7 97.80027
6    X20.7 97.47825
> 
> boxplot(df.m$value)
share|improve this answer
    
@Joris - I think the OP is after an "aggregate" boxplot that doesn't separate by column names, unless I misread the question? –  Chase Feb 15 '11 at 14:12
    
just noticed. It wouldn't have made any sense, as one could simply do boxplot(Data) for that. –  Joris Meys Feb 15 '11 at 14:13
    
Thanks Chase, that worked like a charm. Also thanks for pointing out the handy melt function of the reshape package, which I didn't know about. –  Jura25 Feb 15 '11 at 14:21
1  
@Jura - no worries. If you start to learn the ggplot2 graphics package, it relies heavily on melt to do things very similar to this. –  Chase Feb 15 '11 at 14:33

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