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In my form I have a hidden field:

<input type="hidden" name="auth_token" value="<?php echo $auth_token; ?>">

This value is also stored in a session and a variable:

$_SESSION['auth_token'] = hash('sha256', rand() . time() . $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']);  #  TODO: put this in a function
$auth_token = $_SESSION['auth_token'];

When the form is submitted the two values are compared. It's a basic form token.

Should this be made into two functions or just one when refactored? set_form_token() and get_form_token(), get_form_token() returning the session value, then I can compare it in my main code. What is the proper way of doing this?

EDIT:

Considering both Joel L and RobertPitt's answers I have made these:

function set_auth_token()
{
   if (!isset($_SESSION['auth_token']))
   {
      $_SESSION['auth_token'] = hash('sha256', rand() . time() . $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']);
   }
}

function get_auth_token()
{
   if (isset($_SESSION['auth_token']))
   {
      return $_SESSION['auth_token'];   
   }
   else
   {
      die('No auth token.');
   }
}

function check_auth_token()
{
   if (array_key_exists('auth_token', $_SESSION) && array_key_exists('auth_token', $_POST))
   {
      if ($_SESSION['auth_token'] === $_POST['auth_token'])
      {
         # what happens if user fills the form in wrong first time(?)
         $_SESSION['auth_token'] = hash('sha256', rand() . time() . $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']);
      }
      else
      {
         return false;
      }
   }
   else
   {
      return false;
   }
}

I can then check if check_auth_token returns false or not and then record it after the form has been submitted. Would this be acceptable?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In my app, I actually have the following helper functions for using tokens:

generateToken() // generate and return hash, used in login process.
                // hash then saved to session

getToken() // returns user's token from session

tokenField() // shortcut for echo '<input type="hidden" ... value="getToken()" />';
             // used in page templates

checkToken() // get token from either 1) $_POST 2) request header or 3) $_GET
             // and compare with getToken(). generate error if invalid.

The checkToken() function checks 3 locations because the request can be GET or POST, and either of those could be via AJAX. And I have my AJAX helper automatically insert the token in the header for each request).

This way, I only need to call checkToken() everywhere the check is needed, and can therefore change the impelmentation details quite easily.

For instance, I can start using one-time tokens by changing only getToken() and checkToken().

If you manually compare if (get_form_token() == $token) everywhere in your code, you have no such flexibility.

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I only need to check in two places (login and register), and I do not plan on using one-time tokens. –  john mossel Feb 15 '11 at 17:04

firstly you should understand exactly what the workflow is, and Joel L explains that very simply.

You should encapsulate the methods in a class to keep everything together, some thing like sp:

class FormTokenizer
{
    private $context = "";

    public function __construct($auth_token = "auth_token")
    {
        $this->context = $context;
    }

    public function generateToken()
    {
        $_SESSION[form_tokens][$this->context] = hash('sha256', rand() . time() . $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']);
        return $this;
    }

    public function getToken()
    {
        return isset($_SESSION[form_tokens][$this->context]) ? $_SESSION[form_tokens][$this->context]  : false;
    }

    function generateField()
    {
        return sprintf('<input type="hidden" name="a_%s" value="%s">',$this->context,$this->getToken());
    }

    public function validateToken()
    {
        if(isset($_POST["a_" . $this->context]))
        {
            return $this->getToken() == $_POST["a_" . $this->context];
        }
        return false;
    }
}

and a simple usage would be:

$Token = new FormTokenizer("registration");

if(isset($_POST))
{
    if($Token->validateToken() === false)
    {
        //Token Onvalid
    }
}

//Generate a fresh token.
$hidden_input = $Token->generateToken()->generateField();
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