Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code (stripped down to the bare basics for this question):

#include<stdio.h>
#include<math.h>

double f1(double x)
{
    double res = sin(x);
    return 0;
}

/* The main function */
int main(void)
{
    return 0;
}

When compiling it with gcc test.c I get the following error, and I can't work out why:

/tmp/ccOF5bis.o: In function `f1':
test2.c:(.text+0x13): undefined reference to `sin'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

However, I've written various test programs that call sin from within the main function, and those work perfectly. I must be doing something obviously wrong here - but what is it?

share|improve this question
2  
Are you linking against the math library? –  Nick Feb 15 '11 at 15:11
1  
I think this could be a duplicate –  peoro Feb 15 '11 at 15:13
    
@peoro, It wouldn't surprise me. This is a very common "forgotten" library. –  Edwin Buck Feb 15 '11 at 15:36
1  
+1 for a concise example that shows the problem at hand. –  user195488 Jun 20 '12 at 12:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 46 down vote accepted

You have compiled your code with references to the correct math.h header file, but when you attempted to link it, you forgot the option to include the math library. As a result, you can compile your .o object files, but not build your executable.

As Paul has already mentioned add "-lm" to include the math library in the step where you are attempting to generate your executable.

share|improve this answer
    
why for sin (math.h), we need -lm option explicitly but not for printf() fn defined in stdio.h, I doubt on GNU's linker capabilities. As in VCC it works and on mac too as flarn2006 mentioned. –  linuxD Mar 21 '13 at 5:55
    
Because the math libraries are located in a non-standard to some, yet so commonly accepted it might as well be standard location, and is standard to some. History has conspired to keep it there, as changing it now would break more than it fixes. That's why it's not #include <stdmath.h>, but #include <math.h>. Back then, math implementations might actually be changed for better ones (faster, less memory, more accurate, but likely not all three). So it's really a standardly found not "std" standard library, implemented by libm-version.so in your /usr/lib or /usr/lib64 directory. –  Edwin Buck Mar 21 '13 at 15:03

You need to link with the math library, libm:

$ gcc -Wall foo.c -o foo -lm 
share|improve this answer

I have the problem anyway with -lm added

gcc -Wall -lm mtest.c -o mtest.o
mtest.c: In function 'f1':
mtest.c:6:12: warning: unused variable 'res' [-Wunused-variable]
/tmp/cc925Nmf.o: In function `f1':
mtest.c:(.text+0x19): undefined reference to `sin'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

I discovered recently that it does not work if you first specify -lm. The order matters:

gcc mtest.c -o mtest.o -lm

Just link without problems

So you must specify the libraries after.

share|improve this answer
    
It is a problem that has been bugging gcc since forever :) I though that five years and 2 major releases would have cured it, instead it is still there! Amusing :) –  Lorenzo Dematté Nov 14 '13 at 8:47

I had the same problem, which went away after I listed my library last: gcc prog.c -lm

share|improve this answer

protected by Community Oct 24 '12 at 12:14

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.