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I have a very simple color struct like this

struct {
    unsigned char red;
    unsigned char green;
    unsigned char blue;
    unsigned char alpha;
} RGBA;

Now in some function, I would like to return a structure like this.

But I can't figure out how to do that. All I can think of is creating a local structure, filling each field separately, and then returning it.

RGBA localStructure;
localStructure.red = r;
localStructure.green = g;
localStructure.blue = b;
localStructure.alpha = a;
return localStructure;

Where I really would like to do something like this

return RGBA(r,g,b,a);

is there a way to achieve this in C/C++?

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6  
You need to decide whether this is C or C++. For C++ use a constructor. For C use a function. –  Paul R Feb 15 '11 at 15:19
1  
@Lundin: you are forgetting about NRVO which many modern compilers (gcc, msvc) implement. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Return_value_optimization –  Evan Teran Feb 15 '11 at 16:15
1  
@Lundin: we're talking about a 4 byte struct here - and there's no need for premature optimisation. –  Paul R Feb 15 '11 at 16:23
1  
@Jens Gustedt: unfortunately in the real world most people don't have a choice as to which compiler they use. If you work for a company that uses C on Windows then you are most likely stuck with Visual Studio, execrable though it is, and C99 is not available to you. –  Paul R Feb 15 '11 at 16:49
1  
@Lundin: the optimization has been common in the mainstream compilers for a long time. So while you are right that it isn't guaranteed to happen, it is very likley unless you are working with a less common compiler. You pointed out that "it doesn't make sense" since the result needs to be stored in another variable. The thing is, the optimization is not just about constructors and such, it is specifically that the compiler can construct the result directly in that other location. So you end up with code which is simple (just returns a thing) and is efficient. –  Evan Teran Feb 16 '11 at 15:05

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First, in your first snippet, RGBA is an object whose type is an unnamed struct I don't think that's what you intended. You probably meant either:

typedef struct { ... } RGBA; /* what a lot of C programmers do */

or

struct RGBA { ... }; /* probably what you meant */

Anyway, to answer your question, give it a constructor!

struct RGBA {
    RGBA(unsigned char r, unsigned char g, unsigned char b, unsigned char a) : red(r), green(g), blue(b), alpha(a) {
    }

    unsigned char red;
    unsigned char green;
    unsigned char blue;
    unsigned char alpha;
};

Then you can write:

return RGBA(r,g,b,a);
share|improve this answer
    
This is valid in C++ only. –  peoro Feb 15 '11 at 15:35
    
@peoro: correct, but it does let the OP write the exact code he wanted to :-). –  Evan Teran Feb 15 '11 at 16:15
    
Does this change the size of the struct? It must be convertible into a uint32 here and there. –  bastibe Feb 16 '11 at 8:15
    
@BasitBechtold: no, adding non-virtual member functions to a struct/class in c++ has no effect on the size of the struct/class. But if you really need to convert to uint32_t and you are using c++, it is probably nicer to have a to_uint32_t() method. But that's a different discussion. –  Evan Teran Feb 16 '11 at 14:59

In C you can initialize structures with this shortcut:

RGBA x = { r, g, b, a };

So a quick way to do what you want could be this one:

return (RGBA) { r, g, b, a };
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2  
is that second snippet only for c99? I think anonymous arrays were introduced in c99. –  Evan Teran Feb 15 '11 at 15:23
    
@Evan, yes compound literals are only in the C99 standard. –  Jens Gustedt Feb 15 '11 at 15:28
1  
@Evan Teran: the second example is only for C99, it's called a "compound literal". You can also initialize arrays that way, like (int[]) {1,2,3,4}; –  Gratian Lup Feb 15 '11 at 15:32
    
I would bet that at least one of the compilers this has to be compiled on will not understand C99. –  bastibe Feb 16 '11 at 8:16

In C++ a struct can have a constructor.

struct RGBA{
    unsigned char red;
    unsigned char green;
    unsigned char blue;
    unsigned char alpha;

    RGBA( unsigned char _red, unsigned char _green, unsigned char _blue, unsigned char _alpha ) : red( _red ), green( _green ), blue( _blue ), alpha( _alpha )
    {}

};
share|improve this answer

struct { ... } RGBA defines an object RGBA of an unnamed struct. What you probably mean is typedef struct { ... } RGBA;. Then you can do:

RGBA fun() {
    RGBA obj = { 0xff, 0xff, 0xff, 0 };
    return obj;
}

GCC supports compound C99 literals in C90 mode and in C++, so than you can do:

RGBA fun() {
    return ((RGBA){ 0xff, 0xff, 0xff, 0 });
}
share|improve this answer

Yes, declare a constructor.

struct RGBA { 

   RGBA(unsigned char r, unsigned char g, unsigned b, unsigned char a = 0xff)
     : red(r)
     , green(g)
     , blue(b)
     , alpha(a)
   {
   }

   ...
};

Then use it like this:

 RGBA t = RGBA(0xff,0xff,0);

or this

 return RGBA(0,0,0,0xff);

Note: constructors are an essential C++ feature. You should definitely read up on object orientation in C++. It will make your life much happier.

share|improve this answer
    
Note: I do know about constructors. It does strike me as odd that a struct would have one, though. After all, object orientation is about classes and class instances, not structs. –  bastibe Feb 16 '11 at 8:49
    
struct and class are virtually synonym in C++, except that the default visibility of struct members is public rather than private. Apart from that they're the same. However, it's very common to use struct for pure, plain data structures with no further methods. Adding a constructor that only initializes all members is not really a reason to make it a class by this convention. –  Alexander Gessler Feb 16 '11 at 13:10

Supposing your RGBA struct is unable to be changed, e.g. 3rd party or needs to be in C, and your wish to simplify your return in C++, then you can define an initialisor type to do the work:

struct RGBAInitialisor
{
    RGBAInitialisor(unsigned char r, unsigned char g, unsigned char b, unsigned char a) {
        impl_.alpha = a;
        impl_.blue = b;
        impl_.green = g;
        impl_.red = r;
    }
    // This converts back to the RGBA on the fly.
    operator RGBA ()
    {
        return impl_;
    }
    RGBA impl_;

};

RGBA f()
{
    return RGBAInitialisor(1,2,3,4);
}
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You can create a class instead of a struct (or keep it a struct) and give it a constructor with the 4 parameters.

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A C++ struct is really a class, so you can add a constructor to it, and then provide code to initialize the fields in the constructor.

A C struct has a size, so if you want to initialize all of the fields, you can generally

RGBA localStructure;
memset(&localStructure, 0, sizeof(localStructure));
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