Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i'm looking for a way of getting the class name of the class a static method is invoked on.

eg:

public  class MySuperClass{
    public static String getClassName(){
        //some trick here...
    }
}

and

public  class MyInheritingClass extends MySuperClass{
        //some interesting code here...
        public static void main(String [ ] args){
            System.out.println(MyInheritingClass.getClassName());
            //this should output "MyInheritingClass" and NOT "MySuperClass"
        }
    }

Any idea of how to work it out? thanks

share|improve this question
    
I guess getClassName() should be static... –  pgras Feb 15 '11 at 16:12
    
yeah, this is how I meant it –  ArtoAle Feb 15 '11 at 16:16
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
public  class MyInheritingClass extends MySuperClass{
    //some interesting code here...
    public static void main(String [ ] args){
        System.out.println(MyInheritingClass.getClassName());
        //this should output "MyInheritingClass" and NOT "MySuperClass"
    }
}

This a very misleading way of invoking a static method. It should be illegal. Static methods are not virtual. There is absolutely no possible way to do what you're trying to do.

share|improve this answer
    
I removed my "exercise"...it was completely wrong! –  Mark Peters Feb 15 '11 at 16:12
1  
It is a valid way to invoke the method without knowing at compile-time which class finally implements it. If your main-method was in another compilation unit, you can now add a same-named static method in MyInheritingClass, and then this is called (without recompiling the main method). (This is not a way to solve the question, but it has other uses.) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 15 '11 at 16:43
    
@Paulo: That's correct; in fact my exercise was trying to prove the opposite! My initial reaction was similar to when someboy calls a static method from an instance context, but it's a different scenario than that. –  Mark Peters Feb 15 '11 at 17:28
add comment

this should output "MyInheritingClass" and NOT "MySuperClass"

Then why not just:

MyInheritingClass.class.getSimpleName()

?

share|improve this answer
    
Because actually I nead to use this attribute in the superclass, not in the inheriting one =) –  ArtoAle Feb 15 '11 at 16:15
    
then maybe: this.getClass().getSimpleName() ? –  Puce Feb 15 '11 at 16:18
1  
I cannot reference "this" inside a static scope =) –  ArtoAle Feb 15 '11 at 16:37
    
No, but why would you want to use this on static scope? Always call a static method on the class that declares the method. –  Puce Feb 15 '11 at 16:43
add comment

Try this:

public  class MySuperClass{
    public  String getClassName(){
        return getClass().getName();
    }
}


public  class MyInheritingClass extends MySuperClass{
    public static void main(String [ ] args){
        System.out.println(new MyInheritingClass().getClassName());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah...I think that was a typo on the OP's part. Obviously this it no longer static. –  Mark Peters Feb 15 '11 at 16:13
    
Yeah, I know this should work...actually i was looking for a "static" solution....but it seems i'm doing something not legal =) –  ArtoAle Feb 15 '11 at 16:14
    
@ArtoAle: Classes do not inherit static methods/fields so you probably want to do sth illegal. –  smas Feb 15 '11 at 16:25
    
Yeah, I realized my fault =) now I'll go for the non-static solution –  ArtoAle Feb 15 '11 at 16:38
add comment

try this

this.getClass().getCanonicalName()
share|improve this answer
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Lars Kotthoff Jan 23 '13 at 9:25
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.