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First and once more, thanks to all that already answered my question. I am not a very experienced programmer and it is my first experience with multithreading.

I got an example that is working quite like my problem. I hope it could ease our case here.

public class ThreadMeasuring {
private static final int TASK_TIME = 1; //microseconds
private static class Batch implements Runnable {
    CountDownLatch countDown;
    public Batch(CountDownLatch countDown) {
        this.countDown = countDown;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {         
        long t0 =System.nanoTime();
        long t = 0;
        while(t<TASK_TIME*1e6){ t = System.nanoTime() - t0; }

        if(countDown!=null) countDown.countDown();
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    ThreadFactory threadFactory = new ThreadFactory() {
        int counter = 1;
        @Override
        public Thread newThread(Runnable r) {
            Thread t = new Thread(r, "Executor thread " + (counter++));
            return t;
        }
    };

  // the total duty to be divided in tasks is fixed (problem dependent). 
  // Increase ntasks will mean decrease the task time proportionally. 
  // 4 Is an arbitrary example.
  // This tasks will be executed thousands of times, inside a loop alternating 
  // with serial processing that needs their result and prepare the next ones.
    int ntasks = 4; 
    int nthreads = 2;
    int ncores = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();
    if (nthreads<ncores) ncores = nthreads;     

    Batch serial = new Batch(null);
    long serialTime = System.nanoTime();
    serial.run();
    serialTime = System.nanoTime() - serialTime;

    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool( nthreads, threadFactory );
    CountDownLatch countDown = new CountDownLatch(ntasks);

    ArrayList<Batch> batches = new ArrayList<Batch>();
    for (int i = 0; i < ntasks; i++) {
        batches.add(new Batch(countDown));
    }

    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (Batch r : batches){
        executor.execute(r);
    }

    // wait for all threads to finish their task
    try {
        countDown.await();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    long tmeasured = (System.nanoTime() - start);

    System.out.println("Task time= " + TASK_TIME + " ms");
    System.out.println("Number of tasks= " + ntasks);
    System.out.println("Number of threads= " + nthreads);
    System.out.println("Number of cores= " + ncores);
    System.out.println("Measured time= " + tmeasured);
    System.out.println("Theoretical serial time= " + TASK_TIME*1000000*ntasks);
    System.out.println("Theoretical parallel time= " + (TASK_TIME*1000000*ntasks)/ncores);
    System.out.println("Speedup= " + (serialTime*ntasks)/(double)tmeasured);

    executor.shutdown();
}
 }

Instead of doing the calculations, each batch just waits for some given time. The program calculates the speedup, that would allways be 2 in theory but can get less than 1 (actually a speed down) if the 'TASK_TIME' is small.

My calculations take at the top 1 ms and are commonly faster. For 1 ms I find a little speedup of around 30%, but in practice, with my program, I notice a speed down.

The structure of this code is very similar to my program, so if you could help me to optimise the thread handling I would be very grateful.

Kind regards.

Below, the original question:

Hi.

I would like to use multithreading on my program, since it could increase its efficiency considerably, I believe. Most of its running time is due to independent calculations.

My program has thousands of independent calculations (several linear systems to solve), but they just happen at the same time by minor groups of dozens or so. Each of this groups would take some miliseconds to run. After one of these groups of calculations, the program has to run sequentially for a little while and then I have to solve the linear systems again.

Actually, it can be seen as these independent linear systems to solve are inside a loop that iterates thousands of times, alternating with sequential calculations that depends on the previous results. My idea to speed up the program is to compute these independent calculations in parallel threads, by dividing each group into (the number of processors I have available) batches of independent calculation. So, in principle, there isn't queuing at all.

I tried using the FixedThreadPool and CachedThreadPool and it got even slower than serial processing. It seems to takes too much time creating new Treads each time I need to solve the batches.

Is there a better way to handle this problem? These pools I've used seem to be proper for cases when each thread takes more time instead of thousands of smaller threads...

Thanks! Best Regards!

share|improve this question
    
Would it be possible to post some code? If you use a fixed thread pool then it doesn't create threads over and over again (they are reused). –  Jeff Foster Feb 15 '11 at 17:13
    
What platform are you running this on? Big difference between a multi-core server and a 5-year-old Blackberry. –  MusiGenesis Feb 15 '11 at 17:17
    
@ursoouindio I have proposed a Producer/Consumer pattern with a blocking queue, please check out my answer for more details. –  Lirik Feb 15 '11 at 17:35
    
@Jeff: I would have to create a similar example, since my code depend on several classes. I believe the thread creation problem is due to the alternation of parallel and sequential parts. Actually, the parallel part is over just a smaller part of the program's code. –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 17:56
    
@MusiGenesis, I'm using Ubuntu Linux 10.04 on two machines: a Core 2 Duo T7250 and a Core 2 Quad Q6600. –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 17:57
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From what i've read: "thousands of independent calculations... happen at the same time... would take some miliseconds to run" it seems to me that your problem is perfect for GPU programming.

And i think it answers you question. GPU programming is becoming more and more popular. There are Java bindings for CUDA & OpenCL. If it is possible for you to use it, i say go for it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, @zvezdi! I will take a look at that. It sounds very interesting. –  ursoouindio Feb 16 '11 at 10:45
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Thread pools don't create new threads over and over. That's why they're pools.

How many threads were you using and how many CPUs/cores do you have? What is the system load like (normally, when you execute them serially, and when you execute with the pool)? Is synchronization or any kind of locking involved?

Is the algorithm for parallel execution exactly the same as the serial one (your description seems to suggest that serial was reusing some results from previous iteration).

share|improve this answer
    
CachedThreadPools will stop unused threads which have been idle for 60 seconds, but as @Konrad suggests, fixed thread pool creates the threads which it is created (whether used or not) until it is terminated. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 15 '11 at 17:15
    
@Peter that is correct. I did not consider it worth mentioning as OP mentioned batches of calculations. I reckoned a batch is executed as fast as possible, so no way to be idle for 60s. –  Konrad Garus Feb 15 '11 at 17:17
    
Thanks for the reply, @Konrad. Yes, its not the pools fault the numbers of threads but probably how I manage them inside my code. Thousand of times I call executor.execute(r), for each parallel batch r (and executor was declared only once: executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(numberOfCores);). As I understood, they become new threads (please correct me if I'm wrong). I'm running Ubuntu 10.04 on two machines, one a dual core and the other a quad core. I use the number of threads = the number of cores. –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 17:33
    
About the system load, testing right now I got both processors around 70% on multithreading and just one around 90% on serial run. I did 3 runs to test, they vary a little. There is no need of synchronisation or locking of any kind, except that at the end of a group of batches the multithreading should hold until the next opportunity and the sequential serial calculation needs the batches completed. –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 17:34
    
How about using a higher number of threads? Like numberOfProcessors+2? Are you instantiating thousands of Runnables or Callables for it? –  Konrad Garus Feb 15 '11 at 17:37
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I'm not sure how you perform the calculations, but if you're breaking them up into small groups, then your application might be ripe for the Producer/Consumer pattern.

Additionally, you might be interested in using a BlockingQueue. The calculation consumers will block until there is something in the queue and the block occurs on the take() call.

private static class Batch implements Runnable {
    CountDownLatch countDown;
    public Batch(CountDownLatch countDown) {
        this.countDown = countDown;
    }

    CountDownLatch getLatch(){
        return countDown;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {         
        long t0 =System.nanoTime();
        long t = 0;
        while(t<TASK_TIME*1e6){ t = System.nanoTime() - t0; }

        if(countDown!=null) countDown.countDown();
    }
}

class CalcProducer implements Runnable {
    private final BlockingQueue queue;
    CalcProducer(BlockingQueue q) { queue = q; }
    public void run() {
        try {
            while(true) { 
                CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(ntasks);
                for(int i = 0; i < ntasks; i++) {
                    queue.put(produce(latch)); 
                }
                // don't need to wait for the latch, only consumers wait
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException ex) { ... handle ...}
    }

    CalcGroup produce(CountDownLatch latch) {
        return new Batch(latch);
    }
}

class CalcConsumer implements Runnable {
    private final BlockingQueue queue;

    CalcConsumer(BlockingQueue q) { queue = q; }

    public void run() {
        try {
            while(true) { consume(queue.take()); }
        } catch (InterruptedException ex) { ... handle ...}
    }

    void consume(Batch batch) { 
        batch.Run();
        batch.getLatch().await();
    }
}

class Setup {
    void main() {
        BlockingQueue<Batch> q = new LinkedBlockingQueue<Batch>();
        int numConsumers = 4;

        CalcProducer p = new CalcProducer(q);
        Thread producerThread = new Thread(p);
        producerThread.start();

        Thread[] consumerThreads = new Thread[numConsumers];

        for(int i = 0; i < numConsumers; i++)
        {
            consumerThreads[i] = new Thread(new CalcConsumer(q));
            consumerThreads[i].start();
        }
    }
}

Sorry if there are any syntax errors, I've been chomping away at C# code and sometimes I forget the proper java syntax, but the general idea is there.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 A much more elaborate (and probably much more correct) implementation than my answer above. –  corsiKa Feb 15 '11 at 18:00
    
Thanks, @Lirik! I will take the time to understand your idea. –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 18:57
    
@ursoouindio let me know if something seems confusing... the basic idea is similar to that of a fast food restaurant: you have a line (queue) of customers and you have multiple cashiers. The cashiers are idle until somebody queues up, then the next available cashiers calls a customer off the queue and serves them. The customers are the producers and the cashiers are the consumers. –  Lirik Feb 15 '11 at 19:11
    
I follow that, @Lirik. I just missed the CalcGroup class, but I believe it's not the important part of the idea. I have updated the question with a code, can you help me apply your idea to that one? (if you think it would be effective) –  ursoouindio Feb 16 '11 at 11:45
    
@ursoouindio I didn't know that you called the group of calculations a Batch (fine name btw) so I used a dummy name CalcGroup, so CalcGroup gets replaced by Batch. I've updated my answer with that in mind: note that while this would work sufficiently well, waiting on a CountDownLatch would not be the optimal way to use this pattern. –  Lirik Feb 16 '11 at 16:43
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If you have a problem which does not scale to multiple cores, you need to change your program or you have a problem which is not as parallel as you think. I suspect you have some other type of bug, but cannot say based on the information given.

This test code might help.

Time per million tasks 765 ms

code

ExecutorService es = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
Runnable task = new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // do nothing.
    }
};
long start = System.nanoTime();
for(int i=0;i<1000*1000;i++) {
    es.submit(task);
}
es.shutdown();
es.awaitTermination(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
System.out.println("Time per million tasks "+time/1000/1000+" ms");

EDIT: Say you have a loop which serially does this.

for(int i=0;i<1000*1000;i++)
    doWork(i);

You might assume that changing to loop like this would be faster, but the problem is that the overhead could be greater than the gain.

for(int i=0;i<1000*1000;i++) {
    final int i2 = i;
    ex.execute(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            doWork(i2);
        }
    }
}

So you need to create batches of work (at least one per thread) so there are enough tasks to keep all the threads busy, but not so many tasks that your threads are spending time in overhead.

final int batchSize = 10*1000;
for(int i=0;i<1000*1000;i+=batchSize) {
    final int i2 = i;
    ex.execute(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            for(int i3=i2;i3<i2+batchSize;i3++)
               doWork(i3);
        }
    }
}

EDIT2: RUnning atest which copied data between threads.

for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
    ExecutorService es = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1);
    final double[] d = new double[4 * 1024];
    Arrays.fill(d, 1);
    final double[] d2 = new double[4 * 1024];
    es.submit(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            // nothing.
        }
    }).get();
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    es.submit(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            synchronized (d) {
                System.arraycopy(d, 0, d2, 0, d.length);
            }
        }
    });
    es.shutdown();
    es.awaitTermination(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
    // get a the values in d2.
    for (double x : d2) ;
    long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
    System.out.printf("Time to pass %,d doubles to another thread and back was %,d ns.%n", d.length, time);
}

starts badly but warms up to ~50 us.

Time to pass 4,096 doubles to another thread and back was 1,098,045 ns.
Time to pass 4,096 doubles to another thread and back was 171,949 ns.
 ... deleted ...
Time to pass 4,096 doubles to another thread and back was 50,566 ns.
Time to pass 4,096 doubles to another thread and back was 49,937 ns.
share|improve this answer
    
@Peter, what sort of other bugs do you think it could be? If I can't find a solution based on descriptive information I gave I will try to come up with a representative example. –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 18:27
    
Result for ExecutorService es = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1);: Time per million tasks 1435 ms –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 18:47
    
Result for ExecutorService es = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);: Time per million tasks 1561 ms –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 18:48
    
* on a quad core, Ubuntu Linux 10.04. Tried 3 times and got the smaller value. –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 18:48
    
this is exactly the kind of results I'm having. The multithreading a bit slower than the serial. –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 18:49
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Hmm, CachedThreadPool seems to be created just for your case. It does not recreate threads if you reuse them soon enough, and if you spend a whole minute before you use new thread, the overhead of thread creation is comparatively negligible.

But you can't expect parallel execution to speed up your calculations unless you can also access data in parallel. If you employ extensive locking, many synchronized methods, etc you'll spend more on overhead than gain on parallel processing. Check that your data can be efficiently processed in parallel and that you don't have non-obvious synchronizations lurkinb in the code.

Also, CPUs process data efficiently if data fully fit into cache. If data sets of each thread is bigger than half the cache, two threads will compete for cache and issue many RAM reads, while one thread, if only employing one core, may perform better because it avoids RAM reads in the tight loop it executes. Check this, too.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer! In my case, it will never need to wait 60 seconds to enter the parallel part. It is the most frequent part of my program. Do you think CachedThreadPool is better, even if Plan to always use the same number of parallel threads? –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 18:20
    
And about locking and synchronizing, it is not my case since my program have simpler structure in this sense. And each thread needs just double arrays. They must count up to 2000 elements at each batch. –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 18:23
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Here's a psuedo outline of what I'm thinking

class WorkerThread extends Thread {

    Queue<Calculation> calcs;
    MainCalculator mainCalc;

    public void run() {
        while(true) {
            while(calcs.isEmpty()) sleep(500); // busy waiting? Context switching probably won't be so bad.
            Calculation calc = calcs.pop(); // is it pop to get and remove? you'll have to look
            CalculationResult result = calc.calc();
            mainCalc.returnResultFor(calc,result);      
        }
    }


}

Another option, if you're calling external programs. Don't put them in a loop that does them one at a time or they won't run in parallel. You can put them in a loop that PROCESSES them one at a time, but not that execs them one at a time.

Process calc1 = Runtime.getRuntime.exec("myCalc paramA1 paramA2 paramA3");
Process calc2 = Runtime.getRuntime.exec("myCalc paramB1 paramB2 paramB3");
Process calc3 = Runtime.getRuntime.exec("myCalc paramC1 paramC2 paramC3");
Process calc4 = Runtime.getRuntime.exec("myCalc paramD1 paramD2 paramD3");

calc1.waitFor();
calc2.waitFor();
calc3.waitFor();
calc4.waitFor();

InputStream is1 = calc1.getInputStream();
InputStreamReader isr1 = new InputStreamReader(is1);
BufferedReader br1 = new BufferedReader(isr1);
String resultStr1 = br1.nextLine();

InputStream is2 = calc2.getInputStream();
InputStreamReader isr2 = new InputStreamReader(is2);
BufferedReader br2 = new BufferedReader(isr2);
String resultStr2 = br2.nextLine();

InputStream is3 = calc3.getInputStream();
InputStreamReader isr3 = new InputStreamReader(is3);
BufferedReader br3 = new BufferedReader(isr3);
String resultStr3 = br3.nextLine();

InputStream is4 = calc4.getInputStream();
InputStreamReader isr4 = new InputStreamReader(is4);
BufferedReader br4 = new BufferedReader(isr4);
String resultStr4 = br4.nextLine();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, @glowcoder! I am not using queues in my program, if I have 4 cores I just create 4 batches and call 4 Runnables, solve them and follow to the sequential part of the code until it needs the independent calculations again. –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 17:47
    
That's what I'm saying. If you add a Queue to your thread, you can use the same thread and just give it calculations to solve when they're available. Then your mainCalc can just wait to get back the calculation results. –  corsiKa Feb 15 '11 at 17:58
    
ok, I think I see your point. Inside my code, the independent calculations could be called by c code (via JNI implementation). I'll have to think a little to apply this idea, but at this time great refactorings is not in my plans. And other thing, I cant extend Thread since the parallel routines extend my own basic classes... –  ursoouindio Feb 15 '11 at 18:42
    
About JNI: You could also use an external process instead of using a Thread. I'll edit this notion into the post. About extending Thread: You can always implements Runnable and to Thread worker = new Thread(new Worker()). –  corsiKa Feb 15 '11 at 20:19
    
Actually, the JNI code runs with the main loop, it calls for several java methods, some of them I'm trying to parallelize. –  ursoouindio Feb 16 '11 at 11:43
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