Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
[1-9]\\d{2}-[1-9]\\d{2}-\\d{4}

What does the [1-9] do? is that like a specific range of integer? I tried 194-333-1111 but doesn't validate.

This is a trivial questions but took me an hour and still can't figure out.

Any help is appreciated!!! Thanks


Edit

if (phone.matches("[1-9]\\d{2}-[1-9]\\d{2}-\\d{4}"))
  System.out.println("Invalid phone number");
else
  System.out.println("Valid input. Thank you.");
share|improve this question
    
I think you have extra backslllashes. –  tchrist Feb 15 '11 at 18:42
    
sorry this is done in java... forgot to mention –  CppLearner Feb 15 '11 at 18:45
    
@JohnWong: as every answer has stated, you need to unescape the backslashes. Change them from double backslashes to single backslashes. –  CanSpice Feb 15 '11 at 18:48
    
it doesn't run. "Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Error: Unresolved compilation problem: Invalid escape sequence (valid ones are \b \t \n \f \r \" \' \\ ) at Validate.main(Validate.java:18)" –  CppLearner Feb 15 '11 at 18:49
1  
I think you have everything correct except that there should be a not in the if condition... if (!phone.matches("[1-9]\\d{2}-[1-9]\\d{2}-\\d{4}")) –  Chandu Feb 15 '11 at 19:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

[1-9] matches the range of characters between 1 and 9, inclusive.

Where did you test the expression, because it does match your target string. However the slashes are escaped, as they need to be when entered in may programing languages. It is possible that you tested the expression with an application that will do the escaping for you.

EDIT for code:

You have your error messages reversed. matches() returns true when the string is valid, but you are printing that it is invalid in the true part of the if else statement.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry this is done in java... forgot to mention –  CppLearner Feb 15 '11 at 18:46
    
@JohnWong: see update now that you have posted code –  unholysampler Feb 15 '11 at 19:12

[1-9] matches any digit starting from 1 to 9

The given regex is surely wrong unless you mean \\d as \d and will not match the number given by you. If you can tell what numbers format you want to match, we can give better regex.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry this is done in java... forgot to mention –  CppLearner Feb 15 '11 at 18:47
    
@JohnWong - Regex is same for any programming language. So no issues. –  Sachin Shanbhag Feb 15 '11 at 18:49
    
That isn't exactly correct. While the basic syntax is the same, there are many implementations that vary in their inclusion of some of the more advanced features. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  unholysampler Feb 15 '11 at 18:58
    
@unholysampler - Yes, True. Probably advanced features. But basic notation such as given in above question should not differ I presume. –  Sachin Shanbhag Feb 15 '11 at 19:15

If you can depend on other libraries then I'd suggest you use the libphonenumber open source library from Google to validate your phone number. It has validation support as well.

share|improve this answer
    
yes thanks for the comment. i'd look into that later :] its always good to know these library... and read their source code... –  CppLearner Feb 15 '11 at 18:51

Your regular expression, as it's written, probably won't do what you want it to. You'll need to unescape the backslashes first. For example, in Perl you'd use it like:

if ($number =~ /[1-9]\d{2}-[1-9]\d{2}-\d{4}/) {
  print "matches!\n";
}

Your regex would then break down as follows:

/[1-9]    # Match exactly one of the numbers 1 through 9
 \d{2}    # Match exactly two digits
 -        # Match exactly one dash
 [1-9]    # Match exactly one of the numbers 1 through 9
 \d{2}    # Match exactly two digits
 -        # Match exactly one dash
 \d{4}    # Match exactly four digits
/x

Edit: To show you how your regex as it currently stands works, here's its breakdown:

/[1-9]  # Match exactly one of the numbers 1 through 9
 \\     # Match exactly one \
 d{2}   # Match exactly two 'd's
 -      # Match exactly one dash
 [1-9]  # Match exactly one of the numbers 1 through 9
 \\     # Match exactly one \
 d{2}   # Match exactly two 'd's
 -      # Match exactly one dash
 \\     # Match exactly one \
 d{4}   # Match exactly four 'd's
/x

See how much of a difference the double backslashes make?

share|improve this answer

Given below is breakup of the Regex:

[1-9] // Starts with a digit other than 0
\d{2} // and followed by any two digits
- // and followed by -
[1-9] // and followed a digit other than 0
\d{2} // and followed by any two digits
- // and followed by -
\d{4} // and followed by any four digits 

194-333-1111 matches the above Regex. The issue could be with the escaping character.

e.g:

public static void RegexTest()
    {
            Pattern p = Pattern.compile("[1-9]\\d{2}-[1-9]\\d{2}-\\d{4}");
            Matcher m = p.matcher("194-333-1111");
            boolean b = m.matches();
          System.out.println(b);

    }
share|improve this answer
    
sorry this is done in java... forgot to mention –  CppLearner Feb 15 '11 at 18:47
    
Updated the post with an example in Java. –  Chandu Feb 15 '11 at 18:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.