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I have a class template which can be passed a Class or Class pointer.

/* Template specialization hack to determine if type is a pointer */

struct type_true { };
struct type_false { };

template <class PRT>
class is_pointer : public type_false  {
};

template <class PRT>
class is_pointer <PRT * > : public type_true {
};


template <typename T>
class MyClass {

    //Return an new instance allocated on stack
    T new_instance(type_false n_ptr) {
      T new_obj;
      //Init stuff
      return new_obj;
    }

   //Return an new instance allocated on heap
    T new_instance(type_true is_ptr) {
      T new_obj = new T();
      //Init stuff
      return new_obj;
    }
};

Compilation fails with the following error:

cannot convert 'Class**' to 'Class*' in initialization

I think this is because T is already a pointer new T() thinks i want to allocate a pointer to a pointer. e.g.

OtherClass * new_obj = OtherClass*new();

Is there some way i can strip the * from the T type or another solution?

Thanks Ben

share|improve this question
    
You've got deeper problems. "Return a new instance allocated on stack" doesn't. First, C++ has no concept of stack, what you create is an automatic variable. And then you don't return it in-place, you return a copy (which is good because the lifetime of the automatic variable ends before anything could use it). –  Ben Voigt Feb 15 '11 at 18:52
    
@Ben, C++ does have a "concept of stack", but the rest of your explanation is good. The return value is copied from one place on the the stack (which is about to be deallocated because the function is returning) into another place on the stack (if the return value of your function call is assigned to another stack variable). It may be fairly transparent in some cases, but C++ most definitely has a stack. –  A. Levy Feb 15 '11 at 18:57
    
@A. Levy: The C++ standard has a concept of "stack unwinding" during exception handling, but not a call stack. As long as the prescribed behavior is achieved any data structure can be used for parameters, return values, and automatic variables (requiring a "call stack" would prohibit tail-call optimizations). Most implementations do use a stack, but that is an implementation-specific detail. On an ARM architecture, for example, everything you said will be "on the stack" is probably in a register instead. –  Ben Voigt Feb 15 '11 at 19:04
    
@Ben: Ah...I understand your statement better now. Thanks! –  A. Levy Feb 16 '11 at 14:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is there some way i can strip the * from the T type or another solution?

Of course, you can.

Use this: (it removes just one degree of pointerness, i.e it makes T* -> T, and T** -> T*, etc)

template<typename T>
struct remove_pointer
{
    typedef T type;
};

template<typename T>
struct remove_pointer<T*>
{
    typedef T type;
};

Then,

typedef typename remove_pointer<T>::type type;
T new_obj = new type();

If you want to make T*** -> T i.e remove all *, then replace the above specialization with this:

template<typename T>
struct remove_pointer<T*>
{
    typedef typename remove_pointer<T>::type type;
};
share|improve this answer

Or use this, to remove any level of indirection from the type.

template<typename T> struct stripptr {
    typedef T thetype;
};

template<typename T> struct stripptr<T *> {
    typedef T thetype;
};


template <typename T> struct MyClass {
    static T create() {
        T new_obj;
        return new_obj;
    }
};

template <typename T> struct MyClass<T *> : MyClass<T> {
};
share|improve this answer

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