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public class SocialFriends
    {
        public string id { get; set; }
        public string name { get; set; }
    }

this is my Class.

List<SocialFriends> oList2 = ser.Deserialize<List<SocialFriends>>(response.Content);

I'm getting data's like this. But it returns 0 data :S

Data is here

{"data":[{"name":"George","id":"511222445"},{"name":"Mayk","id":"517247768"}]}

I can't explain this problem? Can anybody say, where is my fault?

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3 Answers 3

Create a class

class Data 
{
    public SocialFriends[] data { get; set; }
}

and change your code to:

Data oList2 = ser.Deserialize<Data>(response.Content);
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I used Your solution, and it worked, thanks. I getted the datas like this. foreach (var friend in oList2.data) Response.Write(friend.id); –  user618377 Feb 15 '11 at 22:01
    
Great! I'm glad I could help. –  Jakub Konecki Feb 15 '11 at 22:15

This code works.

public class SocialFriendsData
{
    public List<SocialFriends> Data { get; set; }
}

public class SocialFriends
{
    public string id { get; set; }
    public string name { get; set; }
}

Deserialization:

 JavaScriptSerializer ser = new JavaScriptSerializer();
 string response = "{\"data\":[{\"name\":\"George\",\"id\":\"511222445\"},{\"name\":\"Mayk\",\"id\":\"517247768\"}]}";
 SocialFriendsData oList2 = ser.Deserialize<SocialFriendsData>(response);
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Your JSON is wrapped in a data property. You'll have to grab the JSON string out of that data property. I don't know which JSON serializer you use, but based on what you provided, the easiest way is probably just to create an intermediate DataHolder class:

public class DataHolder
{
    public string Data { get; set; }
}

Then deserialize it like this:

var dataHolder = ser.Deserialize<DataHolder>(response.Content);
var oList2 = ser.Deserialize<List<SocialFriends>>(dataHolder.Data);

If you're using a robust JSON serializer like Json.NET, you can even skip the intermediate deserialization and change your DataHolder type to the correct type:

public class DataHolder
{
    public List<SocialFriends> SocialFriends { get; set; }
}

And then use this code to get the data:

var dataHolder = ser.Deserialize<DataHolder>(response.Content);
var oList2 = dataHolder.SocialFriends;
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Are properties case-insensitive? I always thought they were case-sensitive... –  Jakub Konecki Feb 15 '11 at 19:40
    
That would completely depend on your JSON serializer. I know Json.NET doesn't care. –  Daniel T. Feb 15 '11 at 19:44

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