Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've set up node.js and nginx on my server. Now I want to use it, but, before I start there are 2 questions:

  1. How should they work together? How should I handle the requests?
  2. There are 2 concepts for a Node.js server, which one is better:

    a. Create a separate http server for each website that needs it. Then load all javascript code at the start of the program, so the code is interpreted once.

    b. Create one single node.js server which handles all node.js requests. This reads the requested files and evals their contents. So the files are interpreted on each request, but the server logic is much simpler.

It's not clear for me how to use node.js correctly.

share|improve this question
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 538 down vote accepted

Nginx works as a front end server, which in this case proxies the requests to a node.js server. Therefore you need to setup an nginx config file for node.

This is what I have done in my Ubuntu box :

Create the file yourdomain at /etc/nginx/sites-available/

vim /etc/nginx/sites-available/yourdomain

In it you should have something like:

# the IP(s) on which your node server is running. I chose port 3000.
upstream app_yourdomain {
    server 127.0.0.1:3000;
}

# the nginx server instance
server {
    listen 0.0.0.0:80;
    server_name yourdomain.com yourdomain;
    access_log /var/log/nginx/yourdomain.log;

    # pass the request to the node.js server with the correct headers and much more can be added, see nginx config options
    location / {
      proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
      proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
      proxy_set_header Host $http_host;
      proxy_set_header X-NginX-Proxy true;

      proxy_pass http://app_yourdomain/;
      proxy_redirect off;
    }
 }

If you want nginx (>= 1.3.13) to handle websocket requests as well, add the following lines in the location / section:

proxy_http_version 1.1;
proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
proxy_set_header Connection "upgrade";

Once you have this setup you must enable the site defined in the config file above:

cd /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/ 
ln -s /etc/nginx/sites-available/yourdomain yourdomain

Create your node server app at /var/www/yourdomain/app.js and run it at localhost:3000

var http = require('http');

http.createServer(function (req, res) {
    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
    res.end('Hello World\n');
}).listen(3000, "127.0.0.1");
console.log('Server running at http://127.0.0.1:3000/');

Restart nginx:

sudo /etc/init.d/nginx restart

Lastly start the node server:

cd /var/www/yourdomain/ && node app.js

Now you should be see "Hello World" at yourdomain.com

One last note with regards to starting the node server: you should use some kind of monitoring system for the node daemon. There is an awesome tutorial at http://howtonode.org/deploying-node-upstart-monit

share|improve this answer
5  
Fantastic answer. Thank you. –  littlejim84 Jun 9 '11 at 12:15
26  
Is there any reason why you can't just do location / { proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:3000; }? Why do you need the whole upstream config bit? –  Robin Winslow Nov 20 '11 at 23:59
7  
+1, Very straightforward and simple answer to a common question; great for people who want to set up virtual hosts using node and nginx. The only thing I think you missed is a qualitative answer to why nginx-in-front-of-node is best for serving multiple vhosts (asker's second question). –  Paul d'Aoust Mar 6 '12 at 17:52
11  
@Robin Winslow in case you want to add more servers for servers for load balancing. –  Joao Da Silva Aug 16 '12 at 10:53
12  
It should be noted that this (very helpful) answer refers to one flavor of nginx that, by default, comes with sites-enabled and sites-available directories inside /etc/nginx. If your version came without these two directories, it likely has a single conf.d directory instead. In that case, following these instructions would have no effect, UNLESS you modify the include statement inside the file nginx.conf to point to sites-enabled instead of the default conf.d. Hope that makes sense. It should become self explanatory once you see the said include statement inside nginx.conf. –  meetamit Oct 18 '12 at 11:35
show 9 more comments

You can also setup multiple domain with nginx, forwarding to multiple node.js processes.

For example to achieve these:

/etc/nginx/sites-enabled/domain1

server {
    listen 80;
    server_name domain1.com;
    access_log /var/log/nginx/domain1.access.log;
    location / {
        proxy_pass    http://127.0.0.1:4000/;
    }
}

In /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/domain2

server {
    listen 80;
    server_name domain2.com;
    access_log /var/log/nginx/domain2.access.log;
    location / {
        proxy_pass    http://127.0.0.1:5000/;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I proxy independent Node Express applications through Nginx.

Thus new applications can be easily mounted and I can also run other stuff on the same server at different locations.

Here are more details on my setup with Nginx configuration example: http://skovalyov.blogspot.dk/2012/07/deploy-multiple-node-applications-on.html

share|improve this answer
    
Why and how you should do it in subdomains instead: skovalyov.blogspot.dk/2012/10/… –  skovalyov Oct 23 '12 at 9:57
add comment

answering your question 2:

I would use option b simply because it consumes much less resources. with option 'a', every client will cause the server to consume a lot of memory, loading all the files you need (even though i like php, this is one of the problems with it). With option 'b' you can load your libraries (reusable code) and share them among all client requests.

But be ware that if you have multiple cores you should tweak node.js to use all of them.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could also use node.js to generate static files into a directory served by nginx. Of course, some dynamic parts of your site could be served by node, and some by nginx (static).

Having some of them served by nginx increases your performance..

share|improve this answer
add comment

I've written a detailed blogpost describing how I created a staging instance on a subdomain inside Linode http://blog.donaldderek.com/2013/08/cf-i-configure-your-staging-machine-with-node-js-and-nginx/

share|improve this answer
add comment

Node.js with Nginx configuration.

$ sudo nano /etc/nginx/sites-available/subdomain.your_domain.com

add the following configuration so that Nginx acting as a proxy redirect to port 3000 traffic from the server when we come from “subdomain.your_domain.com”

upstream subdomain.your_domain.com {
server 127.0.0.1:3000;
}
server {
listen 0.0.0.0:80;
server_name subdomain.your_domain.com;
access_log /var/log/nginx/subdomain.your_domain.access.log;
error_log /var/log/nginx/subdomain.your_domain.error.log debug;
location / {
proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
proxy_set_header X-Forwarder-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
proxy_set_header Host $http_host;
proxy_set_header X-NginX-Proxy true;
proxy_pass http://subdomain.your_domain.com;
proxy_redirect off;
}
}

follow the link to see full configuration and method. Hope this solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.