Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class B that requires an instance of class A to be constructed:

class B
{
    B(A* a); // there is no default constructor
};

Now I want to create a class that contains B as a member, so I also need to add A as a member and provide it to B's constructor:

class C
{
    C() : a(), b(&a) {}
    A a; // 1. initialized as a()
    B b; // 2. initialized as b(&a) - OK
};

But the problem is that if someone occasionally changes the order of the variables definition in the class, it will break

class C
{
    C() : a(), b(&a) {}
    B b; // 1. initialized as b(&a) while "a" uninitialized
    A a; // too late...
};

Is there a good way to resolve this without modifying the classes A and B? Thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
This is why you should always compile with all warnings turned on. All compilers emit a warning here if told to. –  Alexandre C. Feb 15 '11 at 21:20
    
You may simply leave it as it is and add a giant warning as a comment. Also, consider enabling all the warnings, usually compilers provide a warning if the fields declaration order (which is the one that matters) is different from the order of the initializer list; if anyone by chance would swap the order of the two fields you'd get such warning. –  Matteo Italia Feb 15 '11 at 21:21
    
@Alexandre C., @Matteo Italia: I've tried in MSVC and gcc (mingw 3.4.5) - no warning by default... –  7vies Feb 15 '11 at 21:25
    
FWIW, g++ can give you a warning for this case if you compile at -Wall (I can't find the specific warning that triggers this). –  Tim Martin Feb 15 '11 at 21:26
    
g++ 4.4.5 gives such a warning with -Wall –  Matteo Italia Feb 15 '11 at 21:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Is there a good way to resolve this without modifying the classes A and B?

Turn on compiler warnings; for gcc, this is -Wreorder (which is included in -Wall):

cc1plus: warnings being treated as errors
t.cpp: In constructor 'A::A()':
Line 3: warning: 'A::y' will be initialized after
Line 3: warning:   'int A::x'
Line 2: warning:   when initialized here

Alternatively, use a lint-like tool that detects this.


But the problem is that if someone occasionally changes the order of the variables definition in the class…

Why would they do this? I suspect you're worrying too much about what might happen. Even so, you can leave a comment in the class:

A a;  // Must be listed before member 'b'!
B b;

Don't underestimate the force of well-placed comments. :) Then allow someone who purposefully ignores them to get what they deserve; you are using C++, after all.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not worrying as much as you say, I'm just curious. And I cannot turn on compiler warnings on every machine in the world :) –  7vies Feb 15 '11 at 21:36
    
@7vies: If this is for your project, you should have some say over the compiler (and lint) options used. Beyond that, I've learned that I can't fix everyone else, even if I had the time. :) –  Fred Nurk Feb 15 '11 at 21:44

Use the well-known C++ idiom called Base-from-Member to solve this problem.

Define a base class as,

class C_Base
{
    A a; //moved `A a` to the base class!
    C_Base() : a() {}
};

class C : public C_Base
{
    C() : b(&a) {}
    B b; // 1. initialized as b(&a) while "a" uninitialized
    //A a; // too late...
};

Now, a is guaranteed to be initialized before b.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't it weird to create a base class just to force the initialization order? –  7vies Feb 15 '11 at 21:19
    
@7vies: Seems that way to me. It is almost as if deterministic initialization order is useful... –  James Feb 15 '11 at 21:23
    
@7vies: It's well-known idiom. See the edit. :-) –  Nawaz Feb 15 '11 at 21:26
    
@7vies: Yeah, but it's even wierder to think that someone would change the order of variables in class. –  Pawel Zubrycki Feb 15 '11 at 21:28
    
Base-from-member shouldn't be used where it isn't necessary: the complexity just isn't worth it. It is required only if you have a "member" which you need to initialize before a base class. –  Fred Nurk Feb 15 '11 at 21:31

Store b in a unique_ptr, and set it in the body, not in the initializer list:

class C
{
    C() :a() {
        b = std::unique_ptr<B>(new B(&a));
    }
    A a;
    std::unique_ptr<B> b;
};
share|improve this answer

One option would be to not explicitly store the A, but instead to use dynamic allocation to create a new A to store in the B:

class C {
public:
       C() : b(new A) {
           // handled in initialization list
       }
private:
       B b;
};

Since this guarantees that the A is created before the B, this should prevent this problem from ever occurring.

share|improve this answer
1  
Who is going to delete A then? I mean, you allocate memory with new but you cannot delete it, and B is not going to handle this. –  7vies Feb 15 '11 at 21:14

The problem is that you are shooting yourself in the foot with the third example. In C++ the order of member variables in a class/struct matters. No matter how you go about solving your particular problem, if you pass uninitialized data to a constructor due to poor class design / member layout, you will be working with unitialized data and possibly get undefined behavior, depending on the sort of code in place.

To address your particular example, if B really requires an A and the relationship is one to one, why not create a new class AB that has both an A object and a B object in the right order and pass the address of A to B. That is:

class AB
{
public:
  AB():b_(&a_) {}

private:
  A a_;
  B b_;
};

now class C can avoid the ordering problem by using AB instead of A and B:

class C
{
public:
  ...
private:
  AB ab_;
};

As forementioned, this of course assumes a 1:1 relationship between A and B. If an A object can be shared by many B objects, things get more complicated.

share|improve this answer
    
The third example is here just to show why the second one is bad. I know that it is bad, my question is how to make it right. –  7vies Feb 15 '11 at 21:18

I'm not sure how much control you have over the implementation and structure of C but is it necessary to use the objects themselves in class C? Could you redefine the class to use pointers instead and then move them from the initialization list, e.g.

class C
{
   C()
   {
     a = new A;
     b = new B(a);
   }
   ~C() {delete a; delete b;}

   A* a;
   B* b;
};

This avoids the issue of order in the declaration, but gives you the new issue of ensuring they're created correctly. Also, if you create A LOT of C's very often, an initialization list is slightly faster.

share|improve this answer
    
But then how do you protect from anyone reordering the lines in the constructor? ;-) –  Bo Persson Feb 15 '11 at 21:52
    
@Bo Give up on programming and go ride bikes :P –  spbots Feb 15 '11 at 21:57
    
@Bo Persson: Well, for me the difference between reordering lines in code (changing code) and reordering member definitions (e.g. during refactoring) is quite obvious, so I don't see your point. –  7vies Feb 15 '11 at 22:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.