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I'm an experienced PHP/JS developer with a tiny bit of background (read university projects) in Java/C/C++. I'm looking to branch out my skill set and would like some advice on what language would be the best to pick up, along with a UI framework for that language. I have a tiny bit of experience with Qt's C++ implementation.

Let me define what I consider to be "best". I'm looking for something cross-platform (I use a MacBook Pro and a desktop that dual boots Windows/Linux) that is reasonably easy to get into as far as UI goes but will be scalable to larger applications. I'm comfortable writing terminal applications in Java/C/C++/Python/PHP but some of these little things I've written I would be interested in extending with more user friendly/pretty UIs.

At the end of the day, I think this probably boils down to a framework discussion so, let's paraphrase the question as "What cross-platform UI framework is most accessible but also professionally relevant."

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Are you looking for a web or desktop environment? If desktop use eclipse RCP –  stacker Feb 15 '11 at 21:29
    
@stacker I'm specifically looking at a desktop framework. –  Endophage Feb 15 '11 at 22:02
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well 3 are recommended:

  1. Swing (Java)
  2. SWT/JFace (Java)
  3. Qt (C++)

Working with these UI toolkits is almost the same: (generally same approach, good UI designers, good communities ... etc) so the language choice should rely on what external libraries are you using and whether or not you want native look and feel for your application (Only Qt and SWT/JFace can give you native look and feel for your application, swing is very bad at it).

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My understanding from friends who work/have worked in Java is that Swing is rarely used. Java projects almost always use some other ("better"?) UI framework. Any idea if that is the case? My couple of encounters with Swing I've found it very convoluted... –  Endophage Feb 15 '11 at 22:01
    
Since convolution is relative, I would say "Absolutely not" :) Qt and Swing are quite similar and easy to grasp, SWT/JFace is a bit different. But anw, there's very good cross-platform, open source designers for these toolkits that would make your life easier. –  FearUs Feb 15 '11 at 22:24
    
So If you want to use Qt, there's Qt Designer (obviously), if you want to use Eclipse there's WindowBuilder Pro (now open source thanks to Google) for both SWT/JFace and Swing, and finally Netbeans has Matisse (bundeled with the default installation). –  FearUs Feb 15 '11 at 22:26
    
So at the end, if you want Native looks for your app your choice will narrow down for SWT | Qt. Afterwards it depends on what code you already have developed, and on what external libraries you're intending to use. –  FearUs Feb 15 '11 at 22:28
    
Thanks for all the extra info. You win the +1 and accepted answer. I'm playing about with SDL at the moment to familiarize myself more with C++ in general then I will probably move on to Qt. I have a couple of very low spec systems that I would potentially want to run some of my stuff on so I'm more confident Qt would scale down well. As littleadv pointed out it'll run happily on embedded systems. My android phone has an unresponsive interface sometimes so I'm not convinced a Java based solution would scale so well to a lower spec computer. –  Endophage Feb 17 '11 at 21:11
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I like the Qt, it's easy to learn, easy to use, and is cross-platform and versatile enough to perform very well even on an ARM embedded device running busybox.

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+1 Thanks, I wasn't aware Qt was quite so scalable down to embedded systems. Good to know. –  Endophage Feb 16 '11 at 1:00
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Have you considered wxWidgets? It's cross platform and there is multiple language bindings. It has been around for some time and is used in multiple commercial products.

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