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I have HTML code like this:

<tr>    
  <td align="left" valign="bottom"  class="leftfooter"><a href="#">Customer Support</a> <a href="#" class="footerlink">About</a></td>
</tr>

How can I place one small red dot in front of the entire text? Kind of like

  • but red and smaller.

    Edit

    Just to clarify, I didn't write this HTML. I just copied and pasted it to show what I'm working with. I realize that I should use an unordered list to do this same task instead of a table structure for this purpose for semantic reasons. If I can, I will see if I can modify this piece of the code to a more suitable one in the customer's codebase.

  • share|improve this question
    2  
    -1 I see a non-semantic usage of tables. –  zzzzBov Feb 15 '11 at 21:30
    2  
    @zzzzBov: I don't think that should be a criterion for downvoting a question. I am upvoting it... –  MD Sayem Ahmed Feb 15 '11 at 21:33
    2  
    is this realy worth a -1 ??? You don't know why he has to do this. Maybe he works on a sharepoint project :) you should just downvote questions when they are badly asked or if they make no sense, but this one does. –  meo Feb 15 '11 at 21:33
        
    @Sayem, @meo, personally I don't think 'sympathy' should be a criterion for up-voting a question. –  David Thomas Feb 15 '11 at 21:44
    1  
    @meo, I actually am working on a sharepoint project..how did you know? –  Sev Feb 15 '11 at 21:46

    3 Answers 3

    up vote 5 down vote accepted

    I hadn't noticed that you were using table elements, at first, so I'll preface my existing answer with the strong suggestion to use an actual ul, or ol, element. Which conveys some form of meaning of the contents therein. Please consider screen-readers, or users with devices that access the data non-visually.

    Pretty easily:

    html:

    <ul>
        <li><span>Some text</span></li>
        <li><span>more stuff</span></li>
    </ul>
    

    css:

    ul {
        margin-left: 2em;
        padding-left: 1em;
        list-style-type: disc;
    }
    
    li {
        list-style-type: disc;
        color: #f00;
    }
    
    li > span {
        color: #000;
    }
    

    JS Fiddle demo.

    Explanation:

    The reason for the span within the li elements is that the text-color of the 'bullet' (list-style-type: disc;) cannot be changed independently of the text of the li itself. Using the span allows the text contained within to be of a different color to the 'bullet.'

    This is partially related to my own question: How to colour the list-style-type of aut-generated numbers?.


    However to answer the question as asked:

    Using the following image: enter image description here

    The following css will work:

    td {
        background: #fff url(http://i.stack.imgur.com/Q5lQ4.gif) 0 50% no-repeat;
        padding-left: 14px;
    }
    

    JS Fiddle demo.

    I leave it entirely to you to find an actual red bullet image.

    share|improve this answer
        
    You can also change the font-size property on the li to change the size of the bullet. –  bdukes Feb 15 '11 at 21:38
        
    thanks for the great answer! –  Sev Feb 15 '11 at 21:45
        
    @Sev: glad to be of help! :) –  David Thomas Feb 15 '11 at 21:47

    If you want to do it the simplest way possible, you can use an HTML entity Bullet: •

    &bull; (not valid xhtml)

    or

    &#8226;

    You can wrap it in a span to color it as needed.

    share|improve this answer

    Web Design Library's How to Assign Custom List Bullets with CSS has a tutorial which uses the list-style-image CSS property to specify an image.

    share|improve this answer

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