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I always thought about this but never understood why.

Simple example:

public IEnumerator<Effect> GetEnumerator ( )
{
    return this.Effects.GetEnumerator ( );
}

System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator ( )
{
    return this.GetEnumerator ( );
}

Why do you have to specify:

System.Collections.IEnumerator

but not just:

Collections.IEnumerator

I am not saying this is better but to me it seems like it's a step by step approach to solve collisions.

Because sometimes there are quite deeply nested types, so having to type the full name because of a collision feels bad, instead of just prefixing the type with the immediate namespace that contains it so the compiler can try to find it in the currently imported/used namespaces.

Also when I first started C#, I always find myself doing this, thinking this is how it would work. It would be cool to see how other people would have behaved coming fresh to C#, having never used namespace concepts before.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because there is no such thing as using System.*;

This would work:

namespace System
{

   /*System.*/Collections.IEnumerator GetEnumerator ( )
   {
       return this.GetEnumerator ( );
   }


}

But you should not add anything to System lightly.

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Thanks Henk, I wanted it like you said with "using System.*;". Is that a requested feature? Also I can't do your example if my type has to be in another namespace, right? –  Joan Venge Feb 15 '11 at 22:49

I think Foo Bah was trying to say this:

using Collections = System.Collections;

Note that the correct place for this one is inside the namespace and outside the class, like this:

namespace MyNamespace
{
    using SysCollections = System.Collections;

    public class MyClass
    {
        SysCollections.ArrayList mySampleField;
    }
}

I meant to use SysCollections to show there is no restrictions on that alias naming.

Also, note that using System is exactly the 'using System.*' that you want.

So, this works, and it's what most people would do:

using System;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public class MyClass
    {
        Collections.ArrayList mySampleField;
    }
}
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write

using System.Collections;

Then you can write the short-form Collections.IEnumerator

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Yes for this example you could do that, but I meant to ask for ones that have colliding types like you can't import both namespaces so one has to be fully qualified but was thinking, you could leave out some top level namespaces from the colliding type. –  Joan Venge Feb 15 '11 at 22:41

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