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Let's say I have the following multi-line string:

# Section
## Subsection
## Subsection
# Section
## Subsection
### Subsubsection
### Subsubsection
# Section
## Subsection

and I want it to become:

# 1 Section
## 1.1 Subsection
## 1.2 Subsection
# 2 Section
## 2.1 Subsection
### 2.1.1 Subsubsection
### 2.1.2 Subsubsection
# 3 Section
## 3.1 Subsection

In Python, using the re module, is it be possible to run a substitution on the string which would:

  • Match the beginning of each line based on the number of #'s
  • Keep track of past matches of commonly-numbered groups of #'s
  • Insert this counter when appropriate into the line

...assuming that any of these 'counters' are always non-zero?

This problem is testing the limits of my regex knowledge. I already know I can just iterate over the lines and increment/insert some variables, so that's not the solution I want. I'm simply curious if this kind of functionality exists solely within a regular expressions, as I know that some sort of counting already exists (e.g., number of substitutions to make).

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

« Ok, sure, but what if the 'variable manipulation' is being done in a callback function of re.sub, can it be done then? I guess a simplified form of my question is: "Can one use regular expressions to substitue differently based on previous matches?" »

It sounds like we need a generator function as a callback; unfortunately, re.sub() doesn't accept a generator function as a callback.

So we must use some trick:

import re

pat = re.compile('^(#+)',re.MULTILINE)

ch = '''# Section
## Subsection
## Subsection
# Section
## Subsection
### Subsubsection
### Subsubsection
## Subsection
### Subsubsection
### Subsubsection
#### Sub4section
#### Sub4section
#### Sub4section
#### Sub4section
##### Sub5section
#### Sub4section
##### Sub5section
##### Sub5section
### Subsubsection
### Subsubsection
#### Sub4section
#### Sub4section
## Subsection
### Subsubsection
### Subsubsection
### Subsubsection
#### Sub4section
##### Sub5section
##### Sub5section
### Subsubsection
#### Sub4section
## Subsection
### Subsubsection
### Subsubsection
# Section
## Subsection
## Subsection
# Section
## Subsection
### Subsubsection
#### Sub4section
#### Sub4section
#### Sub4section
##### Sub5section
#### Sub4section
### Subsubsection
## Subsection
### Subsubsection
# Section
## Subsection
'''

def cbk(match, nb = [0] ):
    if len(match.group())==len(nb):
        nb[-1] += 1
    elif  len(match.group())>len(nb):
        nb.append(1)
    else:
        nb[:] = nb[0:len(match.group())]
        nb[-1] += 1
    return match.group()+' '+('.'.join(map(str,nb)))

ch = pat.sub(cbk,ch)
print ch

.

« Default parameter values are evaluated when the function definition is executed. This means that the expression is evaluated once, when the function is defined, and that that same “pre-computed” value is used for each call. This is especially important to understand when a default parameter is a mutable object, such as a list or a dictionary: if the function modifies the object (e.g. by appending an item to a list), the default value is in effect modified. This is generally not what was intended. »

http://docs.python.org/reference/compound_stmts.html#function

But here, it IS my plain intent.

Result:

# 1 Section
## 1.1 Subsection
## 1.2 Subsection
# 2 Section
## 2.1 Subsection
### 2.1.1 Subsubsection
### 2.1.2 Subsubsection
## 2.2 Subsection
### 2.2.1 Subsubsection
### 2.2.2 Subsubsection
#### 2.2.2.1 Sub4section
#### 2.2.2.2 Sub4section
#### 2.2.2.3 Sub4section
#### 2.2.2.4 Sub4section
##### 2.2.2.4.1 Sub5section
#### 2.2.2.5 Sub4section
##### 2.2.2.5.1 Sub5section
##### 2.2.2.5.2 Sub5section
### 2.2.3 Subsubsection
### 2.2.4 Subsubsection
#### 2.2.4.1 Sub4section
#### 2.2.4.2 Sub4section
## 2.3 Subsection
### 2.3.1 Subsubsection
### 2.3.2 Subsubsection
### 2.3.3 Subsubsection
#### 2.3.3.1 Sub4section
##### 2.3.3.1.1 Sub5section
##### 2.3.3.1.2 Sub5section
### 2.3.4 Subsubsection
#### 2.3.4.1 Sub4section
## 2.4 Subsection
### 2.4.1 Subsubsection
### 2.4.2 Subsubsection
# 3 Section
## 3.1 Subsection
## 3.2 Subsection
# 4 Section
## 4.1 Subsection
### 4.1.1 Subsubsection
#### 4.1.1.1 Sub4section
#### 4.1.1.2 Sub4section
#### 4.1.1.3 Sub4section
##### 4.1.1.3.1 Sub5section
#### 4.1.1.4 Sub4section
### 4.1.2 Subsubsection
## 4.2 Subsection
### 4.2.1 Subsubsection
# 5 Section
## 5.1 Subsection

EDIT 1 : I corrected else nb[:] = nb[0:len(match.group())] to else: only

EDIT 2 : the code can be condensed to

def cbk(match, nb = [0] ):
    if len(match.group())>len(nb):
        nb.append(1)
    else:
        nb[:] = nb[0:len(match.group())]
        nb[-1] += 1
    return match.group()+' '+('.'.join(map(str,nb))) 
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant! This is exactly what I was looking for. Nicely done! –  Dustin I. Feb 16 '11 at 10:25
    
@Dustin I. Thank you. But what is brilliant is Python. I always code keeping in mind that Python is an acrobat and that its skills must lead to short codes. The possibility of using mutable default argument delights me. –  eyquem Feb 16 '11 at 12:39
    
This is really cool, I had not yet seen a good use for modifying default parameter values like that. –  Andrew Clark Feb 18 '11 at 22:14

Regular expressions are for matching strings. They are not for manipulating variables as the matching occurs. You may not like the solution of iterating over each line and counting yourself, but it is a straightforward solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, sure, but what if the 'variable manipulation' is being done in a callback function of re.sub, can it be done then? I guess a simplified form of my question is: "Can one use regular expressions to substitue differently based on previous matches?" –  Dustin I. Feb 16 '11 at 0:12
    
@Dustin: Python does not support any kind of call back during search. It looks like Perl might have something, but I don't know Perl, so I did not read to much of what the link says. –  unholysampler Feb 16 '11 at 1:13
    
Right, re.search and re.match don't accept callback functions as arguments, but re.sub does. See @eyquem's answer. –  Dustin I. Feb 16 '11 at 10:34
    
There is also the possibility to write for match in re.finditer(pattern, ch): # treat match –  eyquem Feb 16 '11 at 11:25
    
@Dustin Well, look at that, I learned something today. –  unholysampler Feb 16 '11 at 12:15

Pyparsing packages several of these scan/match/replace tasks up for you into its own parsing framework. Here is an annotated solution to your stated problem:

from pyparsing import LineStart, Word, restOfLine

source = """\
# Section 
## Subsection 
## Subsection 
# Section 
## Subsection #
### Subsubsection 
### Subsubsection 
# Section 
## Subsection 
"""

# define a pyparsing expression to match a header line starting with some 
# number of '#'s (i.e., a "word" composed of '#'s), followed by the rest 
# of the line
sectionHeader = LineStart() + Word("#")("level") + restOfLine

# define a callback to keep track of the nesting and numbering
numberstack = [0]
def insertDottedNumber(tokens):
    level = len(tokens.level)
    if level > len(numberstack):
        numberstack.extend([1]*(level-len(numberstack)))
    else:
        del numberstack[level:]
        numberstack[level-1] += 1

    dottedNum = '.'.join(map(str,numberstack))

    # return the updated string containing the original level and rest
    # of the line, with the dotted number inserted
    return "%s %s %s" % (tokens.level, dottedNum, tokens[1])

# attach parse-time action callback to the sectionHeader expression
sectionHeader.setParseAction(insertDottedNumber)

# use sectionHeader expression to transform the input source string
newsource = sectionHeader.transformString(source)
print newsource

Prints the desired:

# 1  Section 
## 1.1  Subsection 
## 1.2  Subsection 
# 2  Section 
## 2.1  Subsection #
### 2.1.1  Subsubsection 
### 2.1.2  Subsubsection 
# 3  Section 
## 3.1  Subsection 
share|improve this answer

This is not a job for regular expressions alone, but you may be able to use them to make your job easier. For example, this splits your full text into the major sections by using regular expressions:

>>> p = re.compile(r"^# .*\n^(?:^##.*\n)*", re.M)
>>> p.findall(your_text)
['# Section\n## Subsection\n## Subsection\n', '# Section\n## Subsection\n### Subsubsection\n### Subsubsection\n', '# Section\n']

You could conceivably do something recursive with a regular expression like this to further split the subsections, but you are much better off just looping through the lines.

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Use that generator trick by eyquem. If not you could always do a find all in global context then rewrite the stuff in a new buffer.

If its just a one off thing this Perl sample does it all...

use strict;
use warnings;

my $data = '
 # 
 ## 
 ## 
 # 
 ## 
 ### 
 ### 
 ###### 
 ##### 
 ####  
 ##### 
 #### 
 ##### 
 ###### 
 ##### 
 ## 
 # 
 ## 
 ';

my @cnts = ();

$data =~ s/^ [^\S\n]* (\#+) [^\S\n]* (.*) $/ callback($1,$2) /xemg;

print $data;

exit(0);

##
 sub callback {
    my ($pounds, $text) = @_;
    my $i = length($pounds) - 1;
    if ($i == 0 || $i <= $#cnts) {
        @cnts[ ($i+1) .. $#cnts ] = (0) x ($#cnts - $i);
        ++$cnts[ $i ];
    }
    else {
        @cnts[ ($#cnts+1) .. $i ] = (1) x ($i - $#cnts);
    }
    my $chapter = $cnts[0];
    for my $ndx (1 .. $i) {
        $chapter .= ".$cnts[ $ndx]";
    }
    return "$pounds \t $chapter $text";
 }

Output:

#        1
##       1.1
##       1.2
#        2
##       2.1
###      2.1.1
###      2.1.2
######   2.1.2.1.1.1
#####    2.1.2.1.2
####     2.1.2.2
#####    2.1.2.2.1
####     2.1.2.3
#####    2.1.2.3.1
######   2.1.2.3.1.1
#####    2.1.2.3.2
##       2.2
#        3
##       3.1

My, all the helpfull people at SO

share|improve this answer
    
Helpful indeed... thanks for giving it a shot! –  Dustin I. Feb 16 '11 at 10:08
    
Perl is said to be a king of regexes. But here, it's longer than my solution and it is less readable than a Python code. Bad points imo –  eyquem Feb 16 '11 at 11:31
import re
import textwrap

class DefaultList(list):
    """
    List having a default value (returned on invalid offset)

    >>> t = DefaultList([1,2,3], default=17)
    >>> t[104]
    17
    """
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.default = kwargs.pop('default', None)
        super(DefaultList,self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

    def __getitem__(self, y):
        if y >= self.__len__():
            return self.default
        else:
            return super(DefaultList,self).__getitem__(y)

class SectionNumberer(object):
    "Hierarchical document numberer"
    def __init__(self, LineMatcher, Numbertype_list, defaultNumbertype):
        """
        @param LineMatcher:       line matcher instance  (recognize section headings and parse them)
        @param Numbertype_list:   list of Number classes (do section numbering at each level)
        @param defaultNumbertype: default Number class   (if too few Number classes specified)
        """
        super(SectionNumberer,self).__init__()
        self.match   = LineMatcher
        self.types   = DefaultList(Numbertype_list, default=defaultNumbertype)
        self.numbers = []
        self.title   = ''

    def addSection(self, level, title):
        "Add new section"
        depth = len(self.numbers)
        if depth < level:
            for i in range(depth, level):
                self.numbers.append(self.types[i](1))
        else:
            self.numbers = self.numbers[:level]
            self.numbers[-1].inc()

        self.title = title

    def doLine(self, ln):
        "Process section numbering on single-line string"
        match = self.match(ln)
        if match==False:
            return ln
        else:
            self.addSection(*match)
            return str(self)

    def __call__(self, s):
        "Process section numbering on multiline string"
        return '\n'.join(self.doLine(ln) for ln in s.split('\n'))

    def __str__(self):
        "Get label for current section"
        section = '.'.join(str(n) for n in self.numbers)
        return "{0} {1}".format(section, self.title)

class LineMatcher(object):
    "Recognize section headers and parse them"
    def __init__(self, match):
        super(LineMatcher,self).__init__()
        self.match = re.compile(match)

    def __call__(self, line):
        """
        @param line: string

        Expects that self.match is a valid regex expression
        """
        match = re.match(self.match, line)
        if match:
            return len(match.group(1)), match.group(2)
        else:
            return False

# Recognize section headers that look like '### Section_title'
PoundLineMatcher = lambda: LineMatcher(r'([#]+) (.*)')

class Numbertype(object):
    def __init__(self, startAt=0, valueType=int):
        super(Numbertype,self).__init__()
        self.value = valueType(startAt)

    def inc(self):
        self.value += 1

    def __str__(self):
        return str(self.value)

class Roman(int):
    CODING = [
        (1000, 'M'),
        ( 900, 'CM'), ( 500, 'D'), ( 400, 'CD'), ( 100, 'C'),
        (  90, 'XC'), (  50, 'L'), (  40, 'XL'), (  10, 'X'),
        (   9, 'IX'), (   5, 'V'), (   4, 'IV'), (   1, 'I')
    ]

    def __add__(self, y):
        return Roman(int.__add__(self, y))

    def __str__(self):
        value = self.__int__()
        if 0 < value < 4000:
            result = []
            for v,s in Roman.CODING:
                while v <= value:
                    value -= v
                    result.append(s)
            return ''.join(result)
        else:
            raise ValueError("can't generate Roman numeral string for {0}".format(value))

IntNumber = Numbertype
RomanNumber = lambda x=1: Numbertype(x, Roman)

def main():
    test = textwrap.dedent("""
        # Section
        ## Subsection
        ## Subsection
        # Section
        ## Subsection
        ### Subsubsection
        ### Subsubsection
        # Section
        ## Subsection
    """)

    numberer = SectionNumberer(PoundLineMatcher(), [IntNumber, RomanNumber, IntNumber], IntNumber)
    print numberer(test)

if __name__=="__main__":
    main()

turns

# Section
## Subsection
## Subsection
# Section
## Subsection
### Subsubsection
### Subsubsection
# Section
## Subsection

into

1 Section
1.I Subsection
1.II Subsection
2 Section
2.I Subsection
2.I.1 Subsubsection
2.I.2 Subsubsection
3 Section
3.I Subsection
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