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I used to write let-like expressions -- with lexical scope.

So I write my own (sad, but it will fail with multiple threads):

# Useful thing for replacing a value of
# variable only for one block of code.
# Maybe such thing already exist, I just not found it.
def with(dict, &block)
  old_values = {}

  # replace by new
  dict.each_pair do |key, value|
    key = "@#{key}"
    old_values[key] = instance_variable_get key
    instance_variable_set key, value
  end

  block.call

  # replace by old
  old_values.each_pair do |key, value|
    instance_variable_set key, value
  end
end

I search in google for such constructions (maybe additional block definitions) for ruby, but can't found it. Maybe I loose something? What ruby-people use in such cases?

PS: Sorry for my bad English, you know.

UPD: I foget to provide example of usage:

@inst_var = 1
with :inst_var => 2 do
  puts @inst_var
end
puts @inst_var

output:

2
1
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What is a let-like expression? –  Andrew Grimm Feb 15 '11 at 23:58
    
@Andrew: let-expressions are used in many languages (LISP, Haskell, ML, ...). cs.cmu.edu/~rwh/introsml/core/decls.htm –  tokland Feb 17 '11 at 7:54
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ick provides let blocks, is that what you want?

lets(:person => Person.find(:first, ...),
     :place  => City.select { ... },
     :thing  => %w(ever loving blue eyed)) do
  "#{person.name} lives in #{place} where he is known as the '#{thing} thing.'"
end

For single-variable scopping, you can use an abstraction (not included in the core) as, pipe, into, scope, let, peg, ..., you name it, it's all the same:

class Object
  def as
    self
  end
end

[1, 2].as { |x, y| x + y } #=> 3
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Two nice suggestions which both result in a clean way to extend the language for your needs. –  froginvasion Jun 4 '13 at 18:23
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You can't specify the value that you want to initialize, but you can declare a variable as explicitly local to that block:

x = 'external value'
puts x
[1,2,3].each do |i; x|
  x = i
  puts x
end
puts x

This will result in:

external value
1
2
3
external value
share|improve this answer
    
It's worth noting that i is also local to the block in this example. –  zetetic Feb 16 '11 at 0:11
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