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I'm writing a controller and unit tests for it, when I came across two ways (equally valid I think) to do something. All my models have an IsValid property, which I can check to ask the model if it's valid or not.

On postback to a controller action method, if the model is valid I want to save, otherwise I want to redisplay the form for the user to correct their errors.

My initial thought was to just verify that the model is being asked if it's valid, but I realized I could also check ModelState.IsValid.

Does anyone have any particular reason to look at one vs the other?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think having custom business validation built into your model is a fine approach. The way I would handle it would be to add any custom validation errors to the ModelState:

if (ModelState.IsValid)
{
    if (!model.IsValid)
    {
       ModelState.AddModelError("The model is not valid");
    }
    else
    {
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }
}

return View(model);

That way your view has access to the validation errors regardless of whether they are custom or built in.

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ModelState can be transferred to TempData to follow Post-Redirect-Get. Example:

    [HttpPost]
    [ExportModelStateToTempData]
    public ActionResult Delete(int id)
    {
        if (_service.DeleteTask(id))
            return RedirectToAction(ControllerActions.Index);

        return RedirectToAction(ControllerActions.Edit, new { id });
    }

    [ImportModelStateFromTempData]
    public ActionResult Edit(int id)
    {
        var task = _service.GetTask(id);
        return View(ControllerActions.Edit, GetEditModel(task));
    }

User can delete task by callig /Task/Delete action, but if something goes wrong and error message appears, pressing F5 won't call deletion again. when ModelState after Delete is transferred to Edit, all errors are shown on edit page.

This is code for attributes importing/exporting ModelState:

public abstract class ModelStateTempDataTransferAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    protected static readonly string Key = typeof(ModelStateTempDataTransferAttribute).FullName;
}

public class ExportModelStateToTempDataAttribute : ModelStateTempDataTransferAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        //Only export when ModelState is not valid
        if (!filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            //Export if we are redirecting
            if ((filterContext.Result is RedirectResult) || (filterContext.Result is RedirectToRouteResult))
            {
                filterContext.Controller.TempData[Key] = filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState;
            }
        }

        base.OnActionExecuted(filterContext);
    }
}

public class ImportModelStateFromTempDataAttribute : ModelStateTempDataTransferAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        ModelStateDictionary modelState = filterContext.Controller.TempData[Key] as ModelStateDictionary;

        if (modelState != null)
        {
            //Only Import if we are viewing
            if (filterContext.Result is ViewResult)
            {
                filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState.Merge(modelState);
            }
            else
            {
                //Otherwise remove it.
                filterContext.Controller.TempData.Remove(Key);
            }
        }

        base.OnActionExecuted(filterContext);
    }
}

Doing the same with Model would be very problematic.

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What is your ControllerActions class? That is new to me. –  Matt Greer Feb 16 '11 at 1:24
    
@Matt Greer: That is just class with constant names of actions, just to have them strongly typed. if you want to play with stronlgy typed names, T4MVC is probably way to go. –  LukLed Feb 16 '11 at 1:28
    
So just a collection of const strings? Drat, I was hoping you had a clever solution to avoiding magic strings. Magic strings have become my biggest pet peeve in recent .NET :) –  Matt Greer Feb 16 '11 at 1:29
    
@Matt Greer: T4MVC once again. –  LukLed Feb 16 '11 at 1:29
    
Awesome, thanks! I am new to ASP.NET MVC and had not heard of this. –  Matt Greer Feb 16 '11 at 1:36

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