Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How would you do borders with opacity in CSS? RGBA colors aren't working for me...

A JSFiddle is self explaining.

There are dark corners in the border, and the background of the element is visible behind it instead of the other elements behind it.

Thank You.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There might be a better way, but this works:

Live Demo

Basically, just use a wrapper div with the rgba set as a background.

HTML:

<div id="boxOuter">
    <div id="box">THANK YOU!</div>
</div>

CSS:

#box{
    background-color:#ccc;font-weight:bold;
    text-align:center;
    line-height:100px;
    height:100px;
    vertical-align:middle;
    font-size:20px;
}
#boxOuter {
    background: rgba(0,0,0,0.5); width:300px; padding: 10px;
    margin-left:25px;
}

Read the comments to this answer to see how to make this method (rgba) work with older browsers.


A way to do it without using a wrapper:

Use outline instead of border, it looks acceptable:

outline: 10px solid rgba(0,0,0,0.5)

Live Demo (it's your exact code, with the one word changed)

(I'm not considering IE here in the slightest)


Check out this article:

http://css-tricks.com/transparent-borders-with-background-clip/

share|improve this answer
    
Now to see if there's a way to do it without a wrapper div.. :) –  thirtydot Feb 16 '11 at 1:12
    
That works awesomely, thanks! I don't think there is a "no-wrapper" way, but go ahead and try! –  JCOC611 Feb 16 '11 at 1:12
    
A good point about using the wrapper div method is that you can make it work in older browsers. See a previous answer of mine for cross browser rgba backgrounds. –  thirtydot Feb 16 '11 at 1:22
1  
Chris Coyer put out a great article on that. I recommend you check it out. –  Connor Feb 16 '11 at 6:28
    
@Connor Montgomery: Thanks, that Coyier article was a good read. I was very glad to see If you'd more complete browser compatibility, you can always go with the double-div method. - it means that my answer thrown together in a few minutes is still applicable advice. I'm putting a link to that article in my answer. –  thirtydot Feb 16 '11 at 9:28

I think the 1st answer is the best though you can use images in borders now, try using a png image with transparency (via photoshop) use the border-image property, there's so many ways to use it you may find another style you prefer in the research.

http://www.css3.info/preview/border-image/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.