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I'm working on a Greatest Common Factor and Least Common Multiple assignment and I have to list the common factors. Intersection() won't work because that removes duplicates. Contains() won't work because if it sees the int in the second list it returns all matching ints from the first list. Is there a way to do an Intersection that is not Distinct?

edit: sorry for not providing an example, here is what I meant:

if I have the sets:

{1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5}
{1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4}

I would want the output

{1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4}
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2  
If a is { 3,3,3,3 } and b is { 3,3 }, how many 3s do you expect in the output? 2, 4 or 6? –  Ani Feb 16 '11 at 2:41
    
I think the answers below confuse the question. The correct question is 'Find the intersection of two sets'. The problem is that the Intersect operator removes duplicates - solve the problem without removing duplicates. –  Kirk Broadhurst Feb 16 '11 at 2:51
1  
two 3s in the output –  DuckReconMajor Feb 16 '11 at 2:57
    
Why? That removes duplicates. Explain your logic. –  Jonathan Grynspan Feb 16 '11 at 5:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted
ILookup<int, int> lookup1 = list1.ToLookup(i => i);
ILookup<int, int> lookup2 = list2.ToLookup(i => i);

int[] result =
(
  from group1 in lookup1
  let group2 = lookup2[group1.Key]
  where group2.Any()
  let smallerGroup = group1.Count() < group2.Count() ? group1 : group2
  from i in smallerGroup
  select i
).ToArray();

The where expression is technically optional, I feel it makes the intent clearer.


If you want more terse code:

ILookup<int, int> lookup2 = list2.ToLookup(i => i);

int[] result =
(
  from group1 in list1.GroupBy(i => i)
  let group2 = lookup2[group1.Key]
  from i in (group1.Count() < group2.Count() ? group1 : group2)
  select i
).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
This worked for me. Thank you! –  DuckReconMajor Feb 16 '11 at 3:09
    
+1 I am reminded heavily of this question, which we both answered. :) stackoverflow.com/questions/4460940/… –  Ani Feb 16 '11 at 3:10
    
@DuckReconMajor, my answer avoids fully counting both matching groups, this has to be better, however it is three years late :-) stackoverflow.com/a/21776543/659190 –  Jodrell Feb 14 '14 at 10:21
var set1 = new HashSet(list1);
var set2 = new HashSet(list2);

var result = list1.Where(x=>set2.Contains(x))
     .Concat(list2.Where(y=>set1.Contains(y))
     .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
-1 When you create a Hashset on a List<int>, you implicitly Distinct that list. This doesn't work. –  Kirk Broadhurst Feb 16 '11 at 2:48
2  
@kirk: please test it before downvoting. –  naveen Feb 16 '11 at 2:53
1  
I did test it, and it didn't work. Try re-reading the question and the comments below it. –  Kirk Broadhurst Feb 16 '11 at 3:03

Are you looking for something like this? It should be pretty-much O(n+m), where n is the number of items in first and m is the number of items in second.

public static IEnumerable<T> Overlap<T>(this IEnumerable<T> first,
    IEnumerable<T> second, IEqualityComparer<T> comparer = null)
{
    // argument checking, optimisations etc removed for brevity

    var dict = new Dictionary<T, int>(comparer);

    foreach (T item in second)
    {
        int hits;
        dict.TryGetValue(item, out hits);
        dict[item] = hits + 1;
    }

    foreach (T item in first)
    {
        int hits;
        dict.TryGetValue(item, out hits);
        if (hits > 0)
        {
            yield return item;
            dict[item] = hits - 1;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here's one way to do it. To be fair, it is very similar to David B's answer except that it uses a join to do the association.

IEnumerable<Foo> seqA = ...
IEnumerable<Foo> seqB = ...

var result = from aGroup in seqA.GroupBy(x => x)
             join bGroup in seqB.GroupBy(x => x) 
                         on aGroup.Key equals bGroup.Key
             let smallerGroup = aGroup.Count() < bGroup.Count() 
                                ? aGroup : bGroup
             from item in smallerGroup
             select item;
share|improve this answer
  • Find the intersection of the two lists.
  • Group the lists by the intersecting items
  • Join the groups, and select the Min(Count) for each item
  • Flatten into a new list.

See below:

var intersect = list1.Intersect(list2).ToList();
var groups1 = list1.Where(e => intersect.Contains(e)).GroupBy(e => e);
var groups2 = list2.Where(e => intersect.Contains(e)).GroupBy(e => e);

var allGroups = groups1.Concat(groups2);

return allGroups.GroupBy(e => e.Key)
    .SelectMany(group => group
        .First(g => g.Count() == group.Min(g1 => g1.Count())))
    .ToList();
share|improve this answer

You could use this generic extension I wrote for another answer, it is essentially a single Linq statement. Note that it uses Zip to avoid the needless full enumeration of matched groups.

public static IEnumerable<T> Commom<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source,
        IEnumerable<T> sequence,
        IEqualityComparer<T> comparer = null)
{
    if (sequence == null)
    {
        return Enumerable.Empty<T>();
    }

    if (comparer == null)
    {
        comparer = EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
    }

    return source.GroupBy(t => t, comparer)
        .Join(
            sequence.GroupBy(t => t, comparer),
            g => g.Key,
            g => g.Key,
            (lg, rg) => lg.Zip(rg, (l, r) => l),
            comparer)
        .SelectMany(g => g);
}

this enables,

new[] {1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5}.Common(
    new[] {1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4}).ToArray()

maintaining the order of the source sequence, as desired.

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