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When do we really need to invoke the parent's overridden method from within the child's overriding method?

namespace MvcMovie.Models
{
    public class MovieInitializer: DropCreateDatabaseIfModelChanges<MovieDbContext>
    {
        protected override void Seed(MovieDbContext context)
        {
            base.Seed(context);// is it necessary to invoke this parent's method here?
        }
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The blunt answer is - "you never know when to call the base class method".

You can also question the order in which the base class method is to be called? as in, before or after the derived class implementation!!

I have asked a similar question, take a look here.

In my opinion, the base class should not expect the derive class to call its method. I mean, the API should be designed in that fashion. Since, if base class expects its users (derived classes) to call its method back (before or after the derived class implementation), then it is actually making assumption about the users. Which indeed is a bad API design.

Hope it would be of help.

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It's not required from the perspective of the CLR. When you want or need to invoke it depends entirely upon the classes involved and what the methods do.

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If it is the given example, there is no reason to override the method at all because you are not adding anything.

An example of of when you would want to override and call the base method would be if you were extending Collection<T> but you want to trigger events when objects are added or removed.

public class Dinosaurs : Collection<string>
{
    public event EventHandler<DinosaursChangedEventArgs> Changed;

    protected override void InsertItem(int index, string newItem)
    {
        base.InsertItem(index, newItem);

        EventHandler<DinosaursChangedEventArgs> temp = Changed;
        if (temp != null)
        {
            temp(this, new DinosaursChangedEventArgs(
                ChangeType.Added, newItem, null));
        }
    }

    ...
}

Source

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When you want the parent's method to run as well as the child's

for example: Child 1 will have A, B and C in its list as it calls the parent's method but Child 2 will only have X, Y Z.

public class Parent
{
    protected IList<string> Names {get;set;}
    public virtual void Addnames()
    {
         Names = new List<string>(){"A", "B"};
    }
}

public class Child1 : Parent
{
    public override void Addnames()
    {
         base.Addnames();
         Names.Add("C");
    }
}

public class Child2 : Parent
{
    public override void Addnames()
    {
         Names = new List<string>(){"X", "Y", "Z"};
    }
}

You would generally do this when you want the base class to perform general functions and the child class adds to that. Hope that helps

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You forgot to write childx inherit from Parent in your code. –  LaTeX Feb 16 '11 at 3:46
1  
@user596314: Thanks edited to reflect it. –  Divi Feb 16 '11 at 4:08

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