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Feel free to run the codes here: http://codepad.org/SAOaOABn

Code:

<?php

$time = time();

echo date_default_timezone_get()."\n";
echo mktime( gmdate("H", $time), gmdate("i", $time), gmdate("s", $time), gmdate("m", $time), gmdate("d", $time), gmdate("Y", $time))."\n";

date_default_timezone_set('Australia/Brisbane');
echo date_default_timezone_get()."\n";
echo mktime( gmdate("H", $time), gmdate("i", $time), gmdate("s", $time), gmdate("m", $time), gmdate("d", $time), gmdate("Y", $time));

Output:

UTC
1297828288
Australia/Brisbane
1297792288

My question is, why does Australia/Brisbane (UTC+10) yield a time value less than the UTC?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're telling the computer that your timezone is UTC+10. Then when you say "please tell me the UTC time when it's 11:00 in Brisbane", you're going to get 01:00 UTC.

The mktime function uses local time, while gmdate uses UTC, so you're not going to get UTC back. If you use date instead of gmdate, you'll get the same time back.

share|improve this answer
    
Unix timestamp is the number of seconds elapsed since January 1, 1970 (UTC). So you are changing the timezone but not changing the time, then converting it to UTC. – Jacob Feb 16 '11 at 4:08

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