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I have been trying to figure tis ou for 3 days and have not gotten anywhere. I have to implement polynomial multiplication (multiply 2 quadratic equations). They look like:

( a1 x^2 + b1 x + c1 ) * ( a2 x^2 + b2 x + c2 );

But the trickier part is to implement it in 5 coefficient multplications. I have reduced it to 6. For eg, a1 * b1, ( a1 + a2 ) * ( b1 + b2 ) count as one multiplication. But (a1 x + a2 ) * ( b1 x + b2 ) count as 4 (a1 b1, a1 b2, a2 b1, a2 b2).

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Could you post the reduction you have to 6 multiplications? –  threenplusone Feb 16 '11 at 7:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You may want to have a look at the Toom-3 algorithm used in multiprecision multiplication. Ref: Toom-Cook multiplication.

Basically, you eval each polynomial at x=-2,-1,0,+1,infinity using only additions and shifts, then multiply these 5 values to get the values of the product at x=-2,-1,0,+1,infinity. The final step is to get back to the coefficients of the result.

For P(X) = A*X^2 + B*X + C the values at x=-2,-1,0,+1,infinity are:

P(-2) = 4*A - 2*B + C  (the products here are bit shifts)
P(-1) = A - B + C
P( 0) = C
P(+1) = A + B + C
P(oo) = A

The product R(X) = T*X^4 + U*X^3 + V*X^2 + W*X + K, and the values are:

R(-2) = 16*T - 8*U + 4*V - 2*W + K
R(-1) = T - U + V - W + K
R( 0) = K
R(+1) = T + U + V + W + K
R(oo) = T

You know the values R(x) = P(x)*Q(x) for x=-2,-1,0,+1,infinity, and you have to solve this linear system to get coefficients T,U,V,W,K.

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Thank you for this. I have been sleepless for 3 days. –  Brahadeesh Feb 17 '11 at 14:35

Hmm I think I found the answer.

you replace it to ( x * ( A1*x + b1 ) + c1 ) * ( x *( a2 * x + b2 ) + c2 );

and there you have it 5 multiplications .

Sorry this was edited , my first answer was wrong and had 9 multiplications indeed.

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I think he's counting that as 9 multiplications. –  ThomasMcLeod Feb 16 '11 at 6:35
    
Yes That is 9 multiplications. If yo want me to specify, I'll do it. But its pretty obvious. –  Brahadeesh Feb 16 '11 at 6:36
    
@Brahadeesh It's not at all obvious. There are five multiplications in that formula. You've tagged the question as optimal but then you seem to insist on expanding your equations. That's what you do when you want something that is sub-optimal. –  David Heffernan Feb 16 '11 at 7:02
    
I believe this is called Horner's method... –  Aryabhatta Feb 16 '11 at 8:18
    
@David I am sorry. I thought 5 multiplication implementation would be optimal. –  Brahadeesh Feb 17 '11 at 14:19

I have also found a 6 multiplication solution, which could help yourself or others solve.

M1 := (a1 + b1)*(a2 + b2)  
M2 := (a1 + c1)*(a2 + c2)  
M3 := (b1 + c1)*(b2 + c2)  
M4 := a1 * a2  
M5 := b1 * b2  
M6 := c1 * c2

This then gives :

M4 * x^4 + 
(M1 - M4 - M5) * x^3 + 
(M2 - M4 - M6 + M5) * x^2 +
(M3 - M5 - M6) * x +
M6
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Thank you for posting this. I had the same solution. –  Brahadeesh Feb 17 '11 at 14:36

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