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Normally, default is not necessary in a switch statement. However, in the following situation the code successfully compiles only when I uncomment the default statement. Can anybody explain why?

public enum XYZ {A,B};
public static String testSwitch(XYZ xyz)
{
    switch(xyz)
    {
    case A:
        return "A";
    case B:
    //default:
        return "B";
    }
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The reason that you have to uncomment the default is that your function says that it returns a String, but if you only have case labels defined for A and B then the function will not return a value if you pass in anything else. Java requires that all functions that state that they return a value actually return a value on all possible control paths, and in your case the compiler isn't convinced that all possible inputs have a value returned.

I believe (and I'm not sure of this) that the reason for this is that even if you cover all your enum cases, the code could still fail in some cases. In particular, suppose that you compile the Java code containing this switch statement (which works just fine), then later on change the enum so that there's now a third constant - let's say C - but you don't recompile the code with the switch statement in it. Now, if you try writing Java code that uses the previously-compiled class and passes in C into this statement, then the code won't have a value to return, violating the Java contract that all functions always return values.

More technically speaking, I think the real reason is that the JVM bytecode verifier always rejects functions in which there is some control path that falls off the end of a function (see §4.9.2 of the JVM spec), and so if the code were to compile it would just get rejected by the JVM at runtime anyway. The compiler therefore gives you the error to report that a problem exists.

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So it's stupidity on the part of the compiler? –  apoorv020 Feb 16 '11 at 6:42
2  
@apoorv020, I dont think that this is stupidity. There are always reasons because this optimization is obvious. –  Alex Nikolaenkov Feb 16 '11 at 6:45
2  
@apoorv020- I just updated my answer with a pretty logical reason that the compiler would reject this. In general compilers aren't stupid - there are some really smart people who pour their heart and soul into making them more and more awesome - and so there's probably a reason for most design decisions in what the compiler allows. –  templatetypedef Feb 16 '11 at 6:47
1  
@apoorv020- Sure! There's actually a family of errors rooted at IncompatibleClassChangeError that are errors that come up in this case. See section 12.7.3 of java.sun.com/docs/books/jvms/second_edition/html/… and specifically the part about verification. –  templatetypedef Feb 16 '11 at 7:02
1  
@apoorv020 - The compiler is not stupid. It is actually treating this as an error because it is required to by the JLS. See my answer for an explanation. –  Stephen C Jul 23 '13 at 13:01

I think this is explained by the JLS definite assignment rules for switch statements (JLS 16.2.9) which states the following:

"V is [un]assigned after a switch statement iff all of the following are true:

  • Either there is a default label in the switch block or V is [un]assigned after the switch expression.

If we then apply this to the notional V which is the return value of the method, we can see that if there is no default branch, the value would be notionally unassigned.

OK ... I'm extrapolating definite assignment rules to cover return values, and maybe they don't. But the fact that I couldn't find something more direct in the spec doesn't mean it isn't there :-)


There's another (more sound) reason why the compiler has to give an error. It stems from the binary compatibility rules for enum (JLS 13.4.26) which state the following:

"Adding or reordering constants from an enum type will not break compatibility with pre-existing binaries."

So how does that apply in this case? Well suppose that the compiler was allowed to infer that the OP's example switch statement always returned something. What happens if the programmer now changes the enum to add an extra constant? According to the JLS binary compatibility rules, we haven't broken binary compatibility. Yet the method containing the switch statement can now (depending on its argument) return an undefined value. That cannot be allowed to happen, so therefore the switch must be a compilation error.

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1  
+1 for actually basing the compatibility argument by looking it up in the JLS. –  sleske Nov 11 '11 at 16:30
    
Interesting. So in essence this is a flaw in the spec, not the compiler. Because of this detail, what could easily be a compile-time error (forgetting an enum value in a switch statement) becomes a runtime error. –  augurar Jul 30 at 23:39
    
@augurar - I don't understand why you call that a flaw in the spec. It is fundamental to the nature of Java that different classes can be compiled at different times. The only way to avoid the (hypothetical) binary compatibility issue with enum and switches would be to require that dependent classes are recompiled after the classes they depend on. That would be a major, breaking change ... and would not be acceptable. –  Stephen C Jul 31 at 2:41

As has been stated, you need to return a value and the compiler doesn't assume that the enum cannot change in the future. E.g. you can create another version of the enum and use that without recompiling the method.

Note: there is a third value for xyz which is null.

public static String testSwitch(XYZ xyz) {
    if(xyz == null) return "null";
    switch(xyz){
    case A:
        return "A";
    case B:
        return "B";
    }
    return xyz.getName();
}

This ha the same result as

public static String testSwitch(XYZ xyz) {
     return "" + xyz;
}

The only way to avoid a return is to throw an exception.

public static String testSwitch(XYZ xyz) {
    switch(xyz){
    case A:
        return "A";
    case B:
        return "B";
    }
    throw new AssertionError("Unknown XYZ "+xyz);
}
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The null value throws an exception already on switch(xyz), no need for a special return here. See JLS 14.11. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 16 '11 at 9:18
    
@Paulo, Unless you don't want to throw a NullPointerException which it is null. e.g. this does what String.valueOf(x) does which does not throw an exception either. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 16 '11 at 9:24

There is a contract that this method has to return a String unless it throws an Exception. And everytime is not limited to those cases where the value of xyz is equal to XVZ.A or XYZ.B.

Here's another example, where it's obviuos, that the code will run correct but where we have a compiletime error for the very same reason:

public boolean getTrue() {
  if (1 == 1) return true;
}

It is not true that you have to add a default statement, it is true, that you have to return a value at any time. So either add a default statement or add a return statement after the switch block.

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Because compiler cannot guess that there are only two values in the enum and forces you to return value from the method. (However I dont know why it cannot guess, maybe it has something with reflection).

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1  
There is also null. –  rlibby Feb 16 '11 at 6:36
    
Yeah, I'm not either why the compiler can't figure out that XYZ has only 2 elements. Since it recognizes XYZ as a type, it has clearly come to the part of the code, and should be able to register the fact that only two possible elements exist. –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Feb 16 '11 at 6:36
    
@rlibby: I recall testing null to see if it made a difference, and I don't think it did. But I will check again. –  apoorv020 Feb 16 '11 at 6:37
    
I think that you don't need to check for null since there's an implicit call to ordinal, but I'm not sure if that's true or not. –  templatetypedef Feb 16 '11 at 6:39
    
@rlibby : adding null produced another error (constant expression required). However, actually calling the function with null generates a null pointer exception in the code at switch statement. –  apoorv020 Feb 16 '11 at 6:41
default: throw new AssertionError();
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