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using system;

class Program
{
public static void main()
 {
  int a = 200,b;
  a-(b=100);
 }
}

Does the above program give out an error? If so then why? I am not in an environment where I can execute the code.

share|improve this question
    
b does not have a type declaration? –  Daniel Feb 16 '11 at 6:44
5  
You officially win the award for "Most Vague Title, Ever". –  Cody Gray Feb 16 '11 at 6:46
    
Sorry forgot to declare b –  SpongeBob SquarePants Feb 16 '11 at 6:46
    
@Cody Please feel free to edit my title. –  SpongeBob SquarePants Feb 16 '11 at 6:48
7  
Are you in middle of a test? :P –  Ravi Gummadi Feb 16 '11 at 6:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can check even without a (local) compiler:

http://ideone.com/m3qJ2

prog.cs(8,4): error CS0201: Only assignment, call, increment, decrement, and new object expressions can be used as a statement Compilation failed: 1 error(s), 0 warnings

Here's the closest I got to compiling your code - http://ideone.com/FPZJq:

using System;

class Program
{
public static void Main()
 {
  int a = 200,b;
  int c = a-(b=100);
 }
}

Errors:

  • a-(b=100) isn't a valid statement in C#. Many languages allow such empty statements (like 2;), but not this one.
  • using system; should be written as using System;
  • main should be written as Main

To answer your question: your code doesn't give a runtime error - it isn't even valid. It does, however, give several compilation errors.

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Thanks , the online compiler will come in handy –  SpongeBob SquarePants Feb 16 '11 at 6:58
    
Thanks , for pointing out errors in typing , I always forget to make them UpperCase. –  SpongeBob SquarePants Feb 16 '11 at 7:01
    
Hey in java we write Main or main ? –  SpongeBob SquarePants Feb 16 '11 at 7:17
    
@abc - Java is using main. These are different conventions - in C# the first letter of methods is in capital case, and in Java is isn't. e.g. toString in Java vs. ToString in C#. –  Kobi Feb 16 '11 at 7:23

The expression a - (b = 100) is not a valid statement and hence the code will not compile.

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Are you sure it won't compile?, brackets are evaluated first , so at the end it should be a- 100, isn't it ? –  SpongeBob SquarePants Feb 16 '11 at 6:53
    
Yes. Even a - 100 is not a valid statement. So that won't compile either. –  Yogesh Feb 16 '11 at 7:04
    
Hmm, you are right , unless I assign it to a variable it will give out an error. –  SpongeBob SquarePants Feb 16 '11 at 7:08

It doesn't compile. a-(b=100); is not a valid statement because:

"Only assignment, call, increment, decrement, and new object expressions can be used as a statement"

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You just copied the whole line from a PDF which I am also referring :P, or maybe thats the error the compiler produces –  SpongeBob SquarePants Feb 16 '11 at 6:54
    
yep that's the compiler error –  saus Feb 16 '11 at 22:28

It gives this compiler error on the second line in the method, as you have an expression that you try to use as a statement:

Only assignment, call, increment, decrement, and new object expressions can be used as a statement.

If you assign the value of the expression to a variable, it compiles:

a = a - (b = 100);
share|improve this answer

a-(b=100)

This does compile and work without any error in C and C++ both, just tried it out.

I ain't into C# so can't say about that for pretty sure but believe me in C,C++ NO ERROR OR WARNING at all, just compiles and works fine.

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Thanks for trying it out in C, C++... +1 –  SpongeBob SquarePants Feb 16 '11 at 7:03

I think at least it will give the error: variable b is not defined.

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Sorry forgot to declare b –  SpongeBob SquarePants Feb 16 '11 at 6:46

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