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I've just done an assignment for one of my classes in Python, it works fine and I'm satisfied with it, but it looks so ugly! I've already submitted this code as we are not being marked on how it looks, but that it runs properly. I wouldn't mind some tips and pointers on how to convert strings to data sets for future projects though.

The input is a grid made up of nodes and edges, an example would be:

"4:(1,2;4),(2,6;3),(3,7;15),(4,8;1),(5,6;1),(6,7;1),(5,9;9),(6,10;2),(7,11;1),(8,12;23),(9,10;5),(9,13;7),(10,14;6),(11,15;3),(12,16;3),(13,14;4),(15,16;7)"

The first number before ":" is the size of the grid (4x4), (1,2;4) means a edge going from node 1 to 2 with cost 4. The following code converts this to an array where array[0] is grid size, and array[1] is a dictionary formated like (node1,node2)=cost.

def partitionData(line):
finalDic = dict()
#partition the data around the formating
line = line.split(":")
line[1] = line[1].split("),(")
#clean up data some more
line[1][0] = line[1][0][1:]
end = len(line[1])-1
line[1][end] = line[1][end][:len(line[1][end])-2]
#simplify data and organize into a list
for i in range(len(line[1])):
    line[1][i] = line[1][i].split(",")
    line[1][i][1] = line[1][i][1].split(";")
    #clean up list
    for j in range(len(line[1][i])):
        line[1][i].append(line[1][i][1][j])
    del line[1][i][1]
#convert everything to integer to simplify algorithm
for i in range(len(line[1])):
    for j in range(len(line[1][i])):
        line[1][i][j] = int(line[1][i][j])
line[0] = int(line[0])
newData = dict()
for i in range(len(line[1])):
    newData[(line[1][i][0],line[1][i][1])] = line[1][i][2]
line[1] = newData
for i in line[1]:
    if not ((min(i),max(i)) in finalDic):
        finalDic[(min(i),max(i))] = line[1][i]
    else:
        print "There is a edge referenced twice!"
        exit()  
line[1] = finalDic
return line

I had something cleaner at first, but it did not take into account that the digits could be larger than 9. I think this is very ugly, there has to be a prettier way to do this.

share|improve this question
    
How robust does your parsing need to be? Could there be whitespace in the input? –  Karl Knechtel Feb 16 '11 at 7:58
    
The parsing would parse the input with the exact format given, so not very robust. –  WhiteDawn Feb 16 '11 at 18:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
import re

# regular expression for matching a (node1,node2;cost)
EDGE = re.compile(r'\((\d+),(\d+);(\d+)\)')

def parse(s):
    # Separate size from the list of edges
    size, edges = s.split(':')

    # Build a dictionary
    edges = dict(
        # ...where key is (node1,node2) and value is (cost)
        # (all converted to integers)
        ((int(node1),int(node2)),int(cost))

        # ...by iterating the edges using the regular expression
        for node1,node2,cost in EDGE.findall(edges))

    return int(size),edges

Example:

>>> test = "4:(1,2;4),(2,6;3),(3,7;15),(4,8;1),(5,6;1),(6,7;1),(5,9;9),(6,10;2),(7,11;1),(8,12;23),(9,10;5),(9,13;7),(10,14;6),(11,15;3),(12,16;3),(13,14;4),(15,16;7)"
>>> parse(test)
(4, {(1, 2): 4, (5, 9): 9, (2, 6): 3, (6, 7): 1, (4, 8): 1, (5, 6): 1, (6, 10): 2, (9, 10): 5, (13, 14): 4, (11, 15): 3, (10, 14): 6, (9, 13): 7, (12, 16): 3, (7, 11): 1, (3, 7): 15, (8, 12): 23, (15, 16): 7})
share|improve this answer
    
What is between ( ) of dict(... ) is a generator. But you loose the interest of a generator by using EDGE.findall(edges) that creates an object. Better to write edges = dict( ((int(node1),int(node2)),int(cost)) for node1,node2,cost in (match.groups() for match in EDGE.finditer(edges)) ) –  eyquem Feb 16 '11 at 12:35
    
Ah regular expressions! Honestly I thought of this, but didn't think there would be a library for it and wasn't sure how I would implement it myself. Thank you! Very helpful! –  WhiteDawn Feb 16 '11 at 19:04
    
@WhiteDawn Despite the fact you don't know the regexes, you seem to be not interested to learn why your code is so rudimentary, but only by a solution. However, you'll HAVE to improve your coding skill because you will never be able to use Python efficiently in such complicated ways that you follow in your code. –  eyquem Feb 16 '11 at 21:50

Solutions already proposed use

  • a parser : too long
  • a regex : I like it but needs to know regexes
  • the module ast: interesting but needs to know it too

.

I treated the problem thinking to do it in the simplest manner understandable to a beginner. Moreover, my solution shows that Python built-in capabilities are enough to do the job.

.

First, I present your code corrected, WhiteDawn, in order that you will be able to see the very basic points which you must understand they can be simplified using the characteristics of Python.

For example, seq being a sequence, seq[len(seq)-1] is its last element, but seq[-1] is the last element too. By the way, there is an error in you code: I think it's

line[1][end] = line[1][end][:len(line[1][end])-1]
# not:
line[1][end] = line[1][end][:len(line[1][end])-2]

otherwise there is a error during execution

Also note the great function enumerate()

And you must study the slicing of list: if li = [45, 12, 78, 96] then li[2:3] = [2, 5, 8] transforms li to li = [45, 12, 2, 5, 8, 96]

y = "4:(1,2;4),(2,6;3),(3,7;15),(4,8;1),(5,6;1),(6,7;1),(5,9;9),(6,10;2),(7,11;1),(8,12;23),(9,10;5),(9,13;7),(10,14;6),(11,15;3),(12,16;3),(13,14;4),(15,16;7)"


def partitionData(line):
    finalDic = dict()

    #partition the data around the formating
    print 'line==',line
    line = line.split(":")
    print '\ninstruction :  line = line.split(":")'
    print 'line==',line
    print 'len of line==',len(line),'  (2 strings)'

    print '---------------------'
    line[1] = line[1].split("),(")
    print '\ninstruction :  line[1] = line[1].split("),(")'
    print 'line[1]==',line[1]

    #clean up data some more
    line[1][0] = line[1][0][1:]
    print 'instruction :  line[1][0] = line[1][0][1:]'
    line[1][-1] = line[1][-1][0:-1]
    print 'instruction :  line[1][-1] = line[1][-1][0:-1]'
    print 'line[1]==',line[1]

    print '---------------------'
    #simplify data and organize into a list
    for i,x in enumerate(line[1]):
        line[1][i] = x.split(",")
        line[1][i][1:] = line[1][i][1].split(";")
    print 'loop to clean the data in line[1]'
    print 'line[1]==',line[1]
    print '---------------------'
    #convert everything to integer to simplify algorithm
    print 'convert everything to integer to simplify algorithm'
    for i,x in enumerate(line[1]):
        line[1][i] = map(int,x)

    line[0] = int(line[0])
    print 'line==',line
    print '---------------------'
    newData = dict()
    for a,b,c in line[1]:
        newData[(a,b)] = c
    line[1] = newData
    print 'line==',line



    print '---------------------'
    for i in line[1]:
        print 'i==',i,'  (min(i),max(i))==',(min(i),max(i))
        if not ((min(i),max(i)) in finalDic):
            finalDic[(min(i),max(i))] = line[1][i]
        else:
            print "There is a edge referenced twice!"
            exit()
    line[1] = finalDic
    print '\nline==',line
    return line


print partitionData(y)

.

Secondly, my solution:

y = "4:(1,2;4),(2,6;3),(3,7;15),(4,8;1),(5,6;1),(6,7;1),(5,9;9),(6,10;2),(7,11;1),(8,12;23),(9,10;5),(9,13;7),(10,14;6),(11,15;3),(12,16;3),(13,14;4),(15,16;7)"


# line[1]== {(1, 2): 4, (5, 9): 9, (2, 6): 3, (6, 7): 1, (4, 8): 1, (5, 6): 1, (6, 10): 2, (9, 10): 5, (13, 14): 4, (11, 15): 3, (10, 14): 6, (9, 13): 7, (12, 16): 3, (7, 11): 1, (3, 7): 15, (8, 12): 23, (15, 16): 7}

def partitionData(line):
    finalDic = dict()
    #partition the data around the formating
    print '\nline==',line

    line = line.split(":")
    print '\ninstruction:\n   line = line.split(":")'
    print 'result:\n   line==',line
    print '\n----------------------------------------------------'

    print '\nline[1]==',line[1]

    line[1] = line[1][1:-1].replace(";",",")
    print '\ninstruction:\n   line[1] = line[1][1:-1].replace(";",",")'
    print 'result:\n   line[1]==',line[1]

    line[1] = [ x.split(",") for x in line[1].split("),(") ]
    print '\ninstruction:\n   line[1] = [ x.split(",") for x in line[1].split("),(") ]'
    print 'result:\n   line[1]==',line[1]

    line = [int(line[0]),dict( ((int(a),int(b)),int(c)) for (a,b,c) in line[1] ) ]
    print '\ninstruction:\n   line = [int(line[0],dict( ((int(a),int(b)),int(c)) for (a,b,c) in line[1] ) ]'
    print 'result:\n   line[1]==',line[1]         


    for i in line[1]:
        if not ((min(i),max(i)) in finalDic):
            finalDic[(min(i),max(i))] = line[1][i]
        else:
            print "There is a edge referenced twice!"
            exit()
    line[1] = finalDic
    print '\nline[1]==',line[1]


    return line


print partitionData(y)

I let the end with FinalDict untouched because I don't understand what does this snippet. If i is a couple of integers, (min(i),max(i)) is nothing else than the couple itself

share|improve this answer

Here's a different approach, which takes advantage of the fact the edge list looks a lot like a bunch of tuples. In practice I'd have probably done what shang did, but that having been already done:

import ast

def build_graph(line):
    size, content = line.split(':')
    size = int(size)
    content = content.replace(';',',')
    edges = ast.literal_eval(content)
    d = {}
    for v0, v1, cost in edges:
        pair = tuple(sorted([v0, v1]))
        if pair not in d:
            d[pair] = cost
       else:
            print "There is an edge referenced twice!"
            return
    return [size, d]


>>> line = "4:(1,2;4),(2,6;3),(3,7;15),(4,8;1),(5,6;1),(6,7;1),(5,9;9),(6,10;2),(7,11;1),(8,12;23),(9,10;5),(9,13;7),(10,14;6),(11,15;3),(12,16;3),(13,14;4),(15,16;7)"
>>> build_graph(line)
[4, {(1, 2): 4, (5, 9): 9, (2, 6): 3, (6, 7): 1, (4, 8): 1, (5, 6): 1, (6, 10): 2, (9, 10): 5, (13, 14): 4, (11, 15): 3, (10, 14): 6, (9, 13): 7, (12, 16): 3, (7, 11): 1, (3, 7): 15, (8, 12): 23, (15, 16): 7}]

As always, the real headaches come in when you care about error handling and rejecting invalid inputs, so I'm going to ignore that issue entirely. :^) But literal_eval is a useful little function to remember, and doesn't have the dangers of a direct "eval".

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time showing how to do it without the re library! I thought there would be an easyish way to convert the nodes to tuples thats why I decided to use tuples in the first place, much cleaner than what I did. –  WhiteDawn Feb 16 '11 at 19:08

What you need is a simple parser. Your input can be shown as in the following Extended-BNF notation:

input := NUM ':' edge_defn*
edge_defn := '(' NUM ',' NUM ';' NUM )
NUM := [0-9]+

You can then either write your own top-down parser or use a parser generator (for example ANTLR or yacc/bison).

Let's go with the writing your own parser. You first need to identify tokens in your input. So far only tokens are: ):,; and numbers. Simply we can use the split() method of Python as in Peter Norvig's Lisp in Python:

 input = "4:(1,2;4),(2,6;3),(3,7;15),(4,8;1),(5,6;1),(6,7;1),(5,9;9),(6,10;2),(7,11;1),(8,12;23),(9,10;5),(9,13;7),(10,14;6),(11,15;3),(12,16;3),(13,14;4),(15,16;7)"
 tokens = input.replace(':', ' : ').replace(')',' ) ').replace('(',' ( ').replace(',',' , ').replace(';', ' ; ').split()

I know, this also looks ugly but this is the only place we use such a hack. What we're doing is simply putting spaces around the symbols and use the split method to get a list of all tokens.

Next we need a get_token function, and because of the edge_defn's we need to look ahead one more token for the last case. This is why where is a global look_ahead variable.

look_ahead = None

def next_token(t):
    global look_ahead
    if look_ahead:
        temp = look_ahead
        try:
            look_ahead = t.next()
        except StopIteration:
            look_ahead = None
        return temp

Then from the BNF notation, we'll write functions for the left-side of the definitions.

def match(t, tok):
    if next_token(t) != tok:
        print "Syntax error! Expecting: ", tok
        exit()

def read_num(t):
    return int(next_token(t))

def edge_defn(t):
    match(t, '(')
    a = read_num(t)
    match(t, ',')
    b = read_num(t)
    match(t, ';')
    c = read_num(t)
    print "%d,%d = %d" % (a,b,c)    # ..do whatever here..
    match(t, ')')

def input(t):
    global grid_size
    grid_size = read_num(t)
    match(t, ':')
    while True:
        edge_defn(t)
        if look_ahead:
            match(t, ',')
        else:
            return


t = tokenizer()
look_ahead = t.next()
input(t)

After calling the first rule (input) the input is parsed and on the way you can execute actions. Although this would be a good exercise in itself, it is better to use a parser generator but I am not sure, if it's going to be accepted. (depends on the purpose of the assignment.)

share|improve this answer
    
Much more in-depth than the other replies and steps me through the process nicely. Thanks! –  WhiteDawn Feb 16 '11 at 19:12
import re
data = "4:(1,2;4),(2,6;3),(3,7;15),(4,8;1),(5,6;1),(6,7;1),(5,9;9),(6,10;2),(7,11;1),(8,12;23),(9,10;5),(9,13;7),(10,14;6),(11,15;3),(12,16;3),(13,14;4),(15,16;7)"
temp = data.split(":")    # split into grid size and rest
array = [int(temp[0]),{}] # first item: grid size
# split the rest of the string (from the second to the second-to-last characters)
# along the delimiters ");("
for item in temp[1][1:-1].split("),("):
    numbers = re.split("[,;]", item)          # split item along delimiters , or ;
    k1, k2, v = (int(num) for num in numbers) # and convert to int
    array[1][(k1,k2)] = v                     # populate the array
print array    

results in

[4, {(1, 2): 4, (5, 9): 9, (2, 6): 3, (6, 7): 1, (4, 8): 1, (5, 6): 1, (6, 10):2, (9, 10): 5, (13, 14): 4, (11, 15): 3, (10, 14): 6, (9, 13): 7, (12, 16): 3, (7, 11): 1, (3, 7): 15, (8, 12): 23, (15, 16): 7}]
share|improve this answer
    
A different way of using regular expressions, cool thanks for the example! –  WhiteDawn Feb 16 '11 at 19:05

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