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If I define an inner class in C++, is it automatically a friend of the class that contains it? For example, is this legal:

class Outer {
public:
    class Inner {
    public:
        void mutateOuter(Outer& o);
    };

private:
    int value;
};

void Outer::Inner::mutateOuter(Outer& o) {
    o.value ++; // Legal?  Or not?
}

I ask because on some compilers I've tried (VS2003) this code won't work, but I've heard at least anecdotally that it does work on some compilers. I can't find a relevant section in the C++ spec about this, and if anyone can cite something specific that would say that it is or is not legal that would be great.

Thanks so much!

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Member functions of a nested class follow regular access rules and have no special access privileges to members of their enclosing classes.: publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v8v101/… –  Anycorn Feb 16 '11 at 7:39
1  
@aaa- Thanks for the link, but this seems to only apply to IBM's compiler, which I know does take a few liberties with the spec (for example, allowing you to take the address of a label with the && operator). Sorry if I'm being a stickler on this one, but I teach a C++ programming course and want to be very certain of the answer before I tell anything to my students. –  templatetypedef Feb 16 '11 at 7:40
    
I don't think so because if that was the case then we would not explicitly need to declare friend classes also within the class body. Just a declaration should suffice in that case –  mukeshkumar Feb 16 '11 at 7:41
    
@template AFAIK they specifically list non-standard extensions. –  Anycorn Feb 16 '11 at 7:41
3  
By the way, the question is not "is it a friend", but "does it have private access". (The former is sufficient, but not necessary.) –  GManNickG Feb 16 '11 at 7:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

No. Nested class cannot access private and protected members of enclosing class by default.

The C++ Standard (2003) says in $11.8/1 [class.access.nest],

The members of a nested class have no special access to members of an enclosing class, nor to classes or functions that have granted friendship to an enclosing class; the usual access rules (clause 11) shall be obeyed. The members of an enclosing class have no special access to members of a nested class; the usual access rules (clause 11) shall be obeyed.

Example from the Standard itself:

class E 
{
    int x;
    class B { };
    class I 
    {
        B b; // error: E::B is private
        int y;
        void f(E* p, int i)
        {
           p->x = i; // error: E::x is private
        }
   };
   int g(I* p)
   {
       return p->y; // error: I::y is private
   }
};
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@templatetypedef: I knew that nested class cannot access private members of enclosing class, but quoted the wrong reference. Anyway I corrected the reference! –  Nawaz Feb 16 '11 at 7:56

After having asked more or less the same question here myself, I wanted to share the (apparently) updated answer for C++11:

Quoted from http://stackoverflow.com/a/14759027/1984137:

standard $11.7.1

"A nested class is a member and as such has the same access rights as any other member. The members of an enclosing class have no special access to members of a nested class; the usual access rules shall be obeyed"

and the usual access rules specify that:

"A member of a class can also access all the names to which the class has access..."

specific examples has been given in the standard:

class E {
    int x;
    class B { };

    class I {
        B b; // OK: E::I can access E::B
        int y;
        void f(E* p, int i) {
            p->x = i; // OK: E::I can access E::x
        }
    };
}
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1  
Fully agree. I think, the answer for this question should be revised, since the code presented in the question can compile correctly now. Here is the proof: link –  Givi Nov 13 '13 at 11:17
    
gcc 4.8.2 has a bug which was only fixed in gcc 4.9.0. gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=59482 –  aiwarrior Jun 8 at 19:11

Since the questioner seems to have accepted one of the answer, this is just a supplementation.
The standard seems to have changed the specification about the accessibility.

§11.8/1 in C++98 states:

The members of a nested class have no special access to members of an enclosing class, nor to classes or functions that have granted friendship to an enclosing class; the usual access rules shall be obeyed.

§11.8/1 in N1804(after TR1) states:

A nested class is a member and as such has the same access rights as any other member.

I think current C++ compilers obey newer specification.

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2  
A nested class is a member, but can nested class members be considered to be members of the enclosing class? It isn't obvious. The nested class itself (not its members) can access members of the enclosing class like this: class Enclosing {private: enum PrivateEnum {VALUE}; class Nested {/*accessing enclosing class' member type*/ PrivateEnum e;}; };. –  Sergey Tachenov Feb 16 '11 at 10:18
    
@SergeyTachenov: Hi. §11.8/1 in N1804 also states: The members of an enclosing class have no special access to members of a nested class; the usual access rules shall be obeyed. This statement didn't change from C++98. So, as for the access from enclosing class to nested class(the opposite of templatetypedef's question), the usual access rules apply. –  Ise Wisteria Feb 16 '11 at 11:50
    
@Ise, I'm not talking about access to members of a nested class, it's an entirely different issue. I'm just not sure if the "a nested class is a member" concept applies to the members of the nested class too. What about several levels of nesting then? –  Sergey Tachenov Feb 16 '11 at 13:39
    
@SergeyTachenov: Sorry, I misunderstood your comment. If you mean whether class A { int i; class B { struct C { void f( A* x ) { x->i = 0; } }; }; }; is allowed in the standard, I suppose allowing it is the standard's intent. VC8, g++3.4.5 and Comeau online allow it. But I cannot say definite thing. If you are concerned, I'd recommend to post that question in StackOverflow. Someone with more detailed knowledge than me will answer. –  Ise Wisteria Feb 16 '11 at 14:24
    
@Ise, sorry for putting irrelevant stuff in. Initially I was commenting on the quote from N1804: "A nested class is a member" - does this imply that members of the nested class are members of the enclosing class too? I mean, in class A {int i; class B {A *a; int f() {return a->i;} }; }; the class B is a member of the class A, but B::f() is a member of the class A::B, not A! But I've just found another quote from DR 45 that might clarify this: "A member of a class can also access all names as the class of which it is a member." In other words, B::f() "inherits" access right of the class B. –  Sergey Tachenov Feb 16 '11 at 17:12

I don't the precise location off the top of my head, but I do recall reading through the specs and finding that any private data in a class is hidden from all other classes, including nested classes.

Basically, nesting a class defines a certain scope, not access priviledges.

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1  
You're incorrect, but I'm only -1'ing because somehow, even with the quoted correct answer nearby, this got +1'd. @Voters, please read all the answers before you go voting willy-nilly. –  GManNickG Feb 16 '11 at 7:50
    
@GMan: this is correct. Please see my post. –  Nawaz Feb 16 '11 at 8:04

Well, I feel silly for asking this question now because I just found the relevant part of the spec that covers this: §11.8/1:

The members of a nested class have no special access to members of an enclosing class, nor to classes or functions that have granted friendship to an enclosing class; the usual access rules (clause 11) shall be obeyed. The members of an enclosing class have no special access to members of a nested class; the usual access rules (clause 11) shall be obeyed

(My emphasis)

So it looks like no, inner classes do not have special access privileges.

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You are misunderstanding that paragraph. There is no 11.8.1, did you mean 11.8p1 (or "11.8/1")? –  Fred Nurk Feb 16 '11 at 7:49
    
@Fred Nurk- Whoops, meant 11.8/1. Will fix. –  templatetypedef Feb 16 '11 at 7:49
    
@Fred Nurk- Also, when you say that I'm misunderstanding it, did that refer to me interpreting it incorrectly, or just mislabeling it? –  templatetypedef Feb 16 '11 at 7:50
    
and @Fred: templatetypedef is correct. Please see my post. I also quoted the example from Standard itself. –  Nawaz Feb 16 '11 at 7:57

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