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I have a simple web service running inside a Tomcat container, which by nature is multi-threaded. In each request that comes into the service, I want to make concurrent calls to an external service. The ExecutorCompletionService in java.util.concurrent gets me partly there. I can provide it a thread pool, and it will take care of executing my concurrent calls and I will be notified when any of the results are ready.

The code to process a particular incoming request might look like:

void handleRequest(Integer[] input) {
    // Submit tasks
    CompletionService<Integer> completionService = new ExecutorCompletionService<Integer>(Executors.newCachedThreadPool());
    for (final Integer i : input) {
        completionService.submit(new Callable<Integer>() {
            public Integer call() {
                return -1 * i;
            }
        });
    }

    // Do other stuff...

    // Get task results
    try {
        for (int i = 0; i < input.size; i++) {
            Future<Integer> future = completionService.take();
            Integer result = future.get();
            // Do something with the result...
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // Handle exception
    }
}

This should work fine and dandy, but is quite inefficient since a new thread pool is being allocated for each incoming request. If I move the CompletionService out as a shared instance, I will run into thread-safety problems with multiple requests sharing the same CompletionService and thread pool. As requests submit tasks and get results, the results they get not be the ones they submitted.

Thus, what I need is a thread-safe CompletionService that allows me to share a common thread pool across all incoming requests. As each thread completes a task, the appropriate thread for the incoming request should be notified so that it can gather the results.

What's the most straightforward way to implement this sort of functionality? I'm sure this pattern has been applied many times; I'm just not sure if this is something provided by the Java concurrency library, or if can be easily built using some of the Java concurrency building blocks.

UPDATE: one caveat I forgot to mention is that I would like to be notified as soon as any of my submitted tasks complete. That's the primary advantage of using a CompletionService, as it decouples the production and consumption of the tasks and results. I don't actually care about the order in which I get the results back, and I'd like to avoid unnecessarily blocking while waiting for the results to be returned in order.

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Do I understand right that with one incomming request you need to start input.length() threads and need to do some action once all the threads are finished? –  Jan Zyka Feb 16 '11 at 8:24
    
That's partially correct. I want to kick off input.length() threads, and want to process the results as soon as the threads finish, regardless of order. I don't care about the order in which I get the results, just that I get notified as soon as any one of them finishes. –  pmc255 Feb 16 '11 at 18:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You share the Executor but not the CompletionService.

We have an AsyncCompleter that does exactly this and handles all the bookkeeping, allowing you to:

Iterable<Callable<A>> jobs = jobs();
Iterable<A> results async.invokeAll(jobs);

results iterates in order of return and blocks until a result is available

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I think this is what I'm looking for. I actually don't care about the order in which the results finish, and want to be notified whenever any task is complete. Can you elaborate on how your AsyncCompleter keeps track of the submitted jobs and notifies blocked threads when any of the jobs finish? –  pmc255 Feb 16 '11 at 18:13
    
Well, the code is open-source :-) –  Jed Wesley-Smith Feb 17 '11 at 2:58
    
On each submission, an AsyncCompletionFunction is created that contains a new CompletionService, this acts to transform the Jobs to a result supplier. We submit the jobs to it and copy the copying the result which enacts the submission. We add a further transform to check for exceptions according to the specified policy and filter out null results. The resulting Iterable<T> is then ready to start delivering your results in the order they arrive. –  Jed Wesley-Smith Feb 17 '11 at 3:04

You can just use a normal shared ExecutorService. Whenever you submit a task, you will get a Future back for the task you just submitted. You can store all of them in a list and query them later.

Example:

private final ExecutorService service = ...//a single, shared instance

void handleRequest(Integer[] input) {
    // Submit tasks
    List<Future<Integer>> futures = new ArrayList<Future<Integer>>(input.length);
    for (final Integer i : input) {
        Future<Integer> future = service.submit(new Callable<Integer>() {
            public Integer call() {
                return -1 * i;
            }
        });
        futures.add(future);
    }

    // Do other stuff...

    // Get task results
    for(Future<Integer> f : futures){
        try {
            Integer result = f.get();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
I just updated my question. Your solution works fine; however, I actually don't care about ordering, so using a standard ExecutorService and iterating through the futures may cause unnecessary blocking. For example, if the last task I submitted finshes earliest, I'd like to be able to process that immediately. The ExecutorCompletionService provides this nicely with its underlying queue, and thus I can simply "take" the first result that completes. –  pmc255 Feb 16 '11 at 18:04

java.util.concurrent provides everything you need. If I understand your question correctly, you have the following requirements:

You want to submit requests, and immediately (within reason) process the request result (Response). Well, I believe you've already seen the solution to your problem: java.util.concurrent.CompletionService.

This service which, rather simply, combines an Executor and a BlockingQueue to process Runnable and/or Callable tasks. The BlockingQueue is used to hold completed tasks, which you can have another thread wait on until a completed task is queued (this is accomplished by calling take()) on the CompletionService object.

As previous posters have mentioned, share the Executor, and create a CompletionService per request. This may seem like an expensive thing to do, but consider again that the CS is simply collaborating with the Executor and a BlockingQueue. Since you are sharing the most expensive object to instantiate, i.e., the Executor, I think you'll find that this a very reasonable cost.

However... all this being said, you still seem to have an issue, and that issue seems to be the separation of Request handling, from the handling of Responses. This might be approached by creating a separate service which exclusively handles Responses for all Requests, or for a certain type of Request.

Here is an example: (Note: it's implied that the Request object implement's the Callable interface which should return a Response type... details which I've omitted for this simple example).

class RequestHandler {

  RequestHandler(ExecutorService responseExecutor, ResponseHandler responseHandler) {      
    this.responseQueue = ...
    this.executor = ...
  }  

  public void acceptRequest(List<Request> requestList) {

    for(Request req : requestList) {

      Response response = executor.submit(req);
      responseHandler.handleResponse(response);

    }  
  }  
}

class ResponseHandler {
  ReentrantLock lock;
  ResponseHandler(ExecutorService responseExecutor) {
    ...
  }

  public void handleResponse(Response res) {
    lock.lock() {
    try {
      responseExecutor.submit( new ResponseWorker(res) );
    } finally {
      lock.unlock();
    }    
  }

  private static class ResponseWorker implements Runnable {

    ResponseWorker(Response response) {
      response = ...
    }

    void processResponse() {         
      // process this response 
    }

    public void run() {      
      processResponse();      
    }  
  }
}

A couple of things to remember: one, an ExecutorService executes Callables or Runnables from a blocking queue; your RequestHandler receives task's, and those are enqueued on the Executor, and processed ASAP. The same thing happens in your ResponseHandler; a response is received, and as soon as that SEPARATE executor can, it will process that response. In short, you've got two executors working simultaneously: one on Request objects, the other on Response objects.

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Thanks, I think sharing the Executor (and thus the thread pool) and creating a CompletionService upon every request is the right way to go (as others have mentioned). As I mentioned above, this is in the context of a Tomcat container, so Tomcat is responsible for dispatching the incoming requests to my application. I'm guessing that's what you mean when you mention the two Executors. Since Tomcat takes care of request dispatching, it's not an issue for me. –  pmc255 Feb 17 '11 at 2:00

Why do you need a CompletionService?

Each thread could simply submit to or invoke Callables on a "regular" and shared instance of an ExecutorService. Each thread then holds on to their own private Future references.

Also, Executor and its descendants are thread-safe by design. What you actually want is that each thread can create its own tasks and inspect their results.

The Javadoc in java.util.concurrent is excellent; it includes usage patterns and examples. Read the doc for ExecutorService and other types to better understand how to use them.

share|improve this answer
    
See my update and comment above. The main thing I forgot to call out is that I don't care about the order in which results come back. Thus, holding on to Future objects and iterating through them may cause unnecessary blocking; I want to process the first result that comes back as soon as it's done, regardless of order. –  pmc255 Feb 16 '11 at 18:06

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