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I have an if condition in my c code. if the if condition is true, i need to call sleep(1) system call and again check the if condition. This has to be done for 9 times maximum. If anytime during the 9 times, the if condition fails i should return from the function. If the 9 times expires, i should call another function. To make it more clear, i will write the pseudo-code below.

function1()
{
  count = 0 
  label : if (condition)
  {
    count++
    sleep(1);
    if(count < = 9)
    goto label;
  }

  if(count > 9)
  {
    return;
  }

  function2(); /* if(condition) failed */
  return;
} /* End of function1() */

What is the best way to implement the above logic. I do not prefer to use the goto statement.

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3 Answers 3

You can reorder this to

for(count = 1; count <= 9; ++count)
{
    if(!condition)
    {
        function2();
        break;
    }
    sleep(1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Where's the sleep? –  falstro Feb 16 '11 at 10:23
    
Hi Roe : i have modified Simon's answer and updated. –  LinuxPenseur Feb 16 '11 at 12:18
    
Thanks, fixed my answer. –  Simon Richter Feb 16 '11 at 14:22

You've implemented a for loop. This would be completely equivalent, except that count will be 1 even if the first condition fails:

function1()
{
  for (count = 1; condition && count <= 9; count ++)
  {
    sleep(1);
  }

  if(count > 9)
  {
    return;
  }

  function2(); /* if(condition) failed */
  return;
} /* End of function1() */

In C you usually count from zero though, but that's just a matter of style.

function1()
{
  for (count = 0; condition && count < 9; count ++)
  {
    sleep(1);
  }

  if(count >= 9)
  {
    return;
  }

  function2(); /* if(condition) failed */
  return;
} /* End of function1() */

EDIT

It's also considered preferable to use a single return, rather than multiple so

function1()
{
  for (count = 0; condition && count < 9; count ++)
  {
    sleep(1);
  }

  if(count < 9)
  {
    function2(); /* if(condition) succeeded within 9 tries */
  }    
} /* End of function1() */
share|improve this answer
    
we will need a single return at the end of function1 right. I think u probably missed it –  LinuxPenseur Feb 16 '11 at 12:23
    
@Linux; actually, since you don't specify return type, the default return type is int, so you must do return 0. But you're not returning anything so I assumed your return type is void, in which case you may leave it out at the end of a function. –  falstro Feb 16 '11 at 14:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

To make Simon's answer cater to my need, i am modifying his answer. Kindly tell me if there is any mistakes

function1()
{
   for(count = 1; count <= 9; ++count)
   {
      if(!condition)
      {
          function2();
          break;
      }
      sleep(1);
   }

   return;

} /* End of function1 */
share|improve this answer
1  
Looks good so far, but unless this is part of a multithreaded program, condition being a variable won't change. If it's multithreaded condition must be volatile and tested using atomic operations. What you have here is basically some crude implementation of a mutex/spinlock. –  datenwolf Feb 16 '11 at 9:25
    
@datenwolf : Thanks a lot. The above piece of implementation is not going into a multithreaded application. –  LinuxPenseur Feb 16 '11 at 9:48
    
his point is condition must be some kind of function, or at least updated by some kind of function which is not stated in your code. –  falstro Feb 16 '11 at 14:12

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