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My bash shell takes up to 3-4 seconds to start up, while if I start it with --norc it runs immediately.

I started "profiling" /etc/bash.bashrc and ~/.bashrc by manually inserting return statements and seeking for speed improvements, but it is not a quantitative process and it is not efficient.

How can I profile my bash scripts and see which commands take most time to start up?

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1  
I profiled the scripts, and most of the time was spent during the setup of bash_completion. –  Andrea Spadaccini Mar 1 '11 at 10:50
1  
That's not surprising since that's pretty big. You could speed that up by removing the parts you know you'll never need if you want to go to the trouble of maintaining your changes across updates, etc. –  Dennis Williamson Mar 13 '11 at 14:27
1  
You could compare: time bash -c 'exit' and time bash -i -c 'exit' and may play with --norc and --noprofile. –  F. Hauri Jan 8 at 9:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 59 down vote accepted

If you have GNU date (or another version that can output nanoseconds), do this at the beginning of /etc/bash.bashrc (or wherever you'd like to begin a trace in any Bash script):

PS4='+ $(date "+%s.%N")\011 '
exec 3>&2 2>/tmp/bashstart.$$.log
set -x

add

set +x
exec 2>&3 3>&-

at the end of ~/.bashrc (or at the end of the section of any Bash script you'd like tracing to stop).

You should get a trace log in /tmp/bashstart.PID.log that shows the seconds.nanoseconds timestamp of each command that was executed. The difference from one time to the next is the amount of time that the intervening step took.

As you narrow things down, you can move set -x later and set +x earlier (or bracket several sections of interest selectively).

share|improve this answer
    
Is it normal that the shell prompt is invisible and that my commands are not echoed back? However, I got the trace so I can start the analysis.. thanks a lot! –  Andrea Spadaccini Feb 17 '11 at 14:13
    
@AndreaSpadaccini: The final exec should return fd2 to normal so you should get the prompt back. –  Dennis Williamson Feb 17 '11 at 14:44
    
There's a pretty heavy performance penalty from running all the date commands here. If you're not going for a lot of resolution, why not put \t in a PS4 string? –  Charles Duffy Jul 18 '13 at 21:29
1  
...actually, with bash 4.2, one can do better -- using \D{...} in PS4 allows completely arbitrary time format strings to be expanded without the performance overhead of launching date as a subprocess. –  Charles Duffy Jul 18 '13 at 21:35
1  
@CharlesDuffy: Those are both really cool. However GNU date understands %N and Bash 4.2 doesn't (because strftime(3) doesn't) on GNU system - so arbitrary with limits. Your point about performance versus resolution is a good one and a user should make the choice wisely, keeping in mind that the performance hit is a temporary on only during debugging (and only when set -x is in effect). –  Dennis Williamson Jul 18 '13 at 22:08

Profiling (3 answers)

Reading this and because profiling is an important step, I've done some test and research about this whole SO question and already posted answers.

There is 3 answer:

  • The first is based on @DennisWilliamson's idea but with a lot less of resource consumtion
  • The second was my own (before this;)
  • The last is based on @fgm answer, but more accurate.

Finally, a little comparisson of performances at end.

Using set -x and date but with limited forks

Take from @DennisWilliamson's idea, but with the following syntax, there will ony one initial fork to 3 commands:

exec 3>&2 2> >(tee /tmp/sample-time.$$.log |
                 sed -u 's/^.*$/now/' |
                 date -f - +%s.%N >/tmp/sample-time.$$.tim)
set -x

Doing this will run date only once. There is a quick demo/test to show how it work:

for i in {1..4};do echo now;sleep .05;done| date -f - +%N

Sample script:

#!/bin/bash

exec 3>&2 2> >( tee /tmp/sample-$$.log |
                  sed -u 's/^.*$/now/' |
                  date -f - +%s.%N >/tmp/sample-$$.tim)
set -x

for ((i=3;i--;));do sleep .1;done

for ((i=2;i--;))
do
    tar -cf /tmp/test.tar -C / bin
    gzip /tmp/test.tar
    rm /tmp/test.tar.gz
done

set +x
exec 2>&3 3>&-

By running this script, you make 2 files: /tmp/sample-XXXX.log and /tmp/sample-XXXX.tim (where XXXX is process id of running script).

You could present them by using paste:

paste tmp/sample-XXXX.{tim,log}

Or you may even compute diff time:

paste <(
    while read tim ;do
        crt=000000000$((${tim//.}-10#0$last))
        printf "%12.9f\n" ${crt:0:${#crt}-9}.${crt:${#crt}-9}
        last=${tim//.}
      done < sample-time.24804.tim
  ) sample-time.24804.log 

 1388487534.391309713        + (( i=3 ))
 0.000080807        + (( i-- ))
 0.000008312        + sleep .1
 0.101304843        + (( 1 ))
 0.000032616        + (( i-- ))
 0.000007124        + sleep .1
 0.101251684        + (( 1 ))
 0.000033036        + (( i-- ))
 0.000007054        + sleep .1
 0.104013813        + (( 1 ))
 0.000026959        + (( i-- ))
 0.000006915        + (( i=2 ))
 0.000006635        + (( i-- ))
 0.000006844        + tar -cf /tmp/test.tar -C / bin
 0.022655107        + gzip /tmp/test.tar
 0.637042668        + rm /tmp/test.tar.gz
 0.000823649        + (( 1 ))
 0.000011314        + (( i-- ))
 0.000006915        + tar -cf /tmp/test.tar -C / bin
 0.016084482        + gzip /tmp/test.tar
 0.627798263        + rm /tmp/test.tar.gz
 0.001294946        + (( 1 ))
 0.000023187        + (( i-- ))
 0.000006845        + set +x

or on two columns:

paste <(
    while read tim ;do
        [ -z "$last" ] && last=${tim//.} && first=${tim//.}
        crt=000000000$((${tim//.}-10#0$last))
        ctot=000000000$((${tim//.}-10#0$first))
        printf "%12.9f %12.9f\n" ${crt:0:${#crt}-9}.${crt:${#crt}-9} \
                                 ${ctot:0:${#ctot}-9}.${ctot:${#ctot}-9}
        last=${tim//.}
      done < sample-time.24804.tim
  ) sample-time.24804.log

May render:

 0.000000000  0.000000000   + (( i=3 ))
 0.000080807  0.000080807   + (( i-- ))
 0.000008312  0.000089119   + sleep .1
 0.101304843  0.101393962   + (( 1 ))
 0.000032616  0.101426578   + (( i-- ))
 0.000007124  0.101433702   + sleep .1
 0.101251684  0.202685386   + (( 1 ))
 0.000033036  0.202718422   + (( i-- ))
 0.000007054  0.202725476   + sleep .1
 0.104013813  0.306739289   + (( 1 ))
 0.000026959  0.306766248   + (( i-- ))
 0.000006915  0.306773163   + (( i=2 ))
 0.000006635  0.306779798   + (( i-- ))
 0.000006844  0.306786642   + tar -cf /tmp/test.tar -C / bin
 0.022655107  0.329441749   + gzip /tmp/test.tar
 0.637042668  0.966484417   + rm /tmp/test.tar.gz
 0.000823649  0.967308066   + (( 1 ))
 0.000011314  0.967319380   + (( i-- ))
 0.000006915  0.967326295   + tar -cf /tmp/test.tar -C / bin
 0.016084482  0.983410777   + gzip /tmp/test.tar
 0.627798263  1.611209040   + rm /tmp/test.tar.gz
 0.001294946  1.612503986   + (( 1 ))
 0.000023187  1.612527173   + (( i-- ))
 0.000006845  1.612534018   + set +x

Using trap debug and /proc/timer_list on recent GNU/Linux kernels, without forks.

Under GNU/Linux's recent kernels, you may find a /proc file named timer_list:

grep 'now at\|offset' /proc/timer_list
now at 5461935212966259 nsecs
  .offset:     0 nsecs
  .offset:     1383718821564493249 nsecs
  .offset:     0 nsecs

Where current time is the sum of 5461935212966259 + 1383718821564493249, but in nanoseconds.

So for computing elapsed time, there is no need of knowing offset.

For this kind of jobs, I wrote elap.bash (V2), that be sourced by the following syntax:

source elap.bash-v2

or

. elap.bash-v2 init

(See comments for full syntax)

So you could simply add this line at top of your script:

. elap.bash-v2 trap2

Little sample:

#!/bin/bash

. elap.bash-v2 trap

for ((i=3;i--;));do sleep .1;done

elapCalc2
elapShowTotal \\e[1mfirst total\\e[0m

for ((i=2;i--;))
do
    tar -cf /tmp/test.tar -C / bin
    gzip /tmp/test.tar
    rm /tmp/test.tar.gz
done

trap -- debug
elapTotal \\e[1mtotal time\\e[0m

Do render on my host:

 0.000947481 Starting
 0.000796900 ((i=3))
 0.000696956 ((i--))
 0.101969242 sleep .1
 0.000812478 ((1))
 0.000755067 ((i--))
 0.103693305 sleep .1
 0.000730482 ((1))
 0.000660360 ((i--))
 0.103565001 sleep .1
 0.000719516 ((1))
 0.000671325 ((i--))
 0.000754856 elapCalc2
 0.316018113 first total
 0.000754787 elapShowTotal \e[1mfirst total\e[0m
 0.000711275 ((i=2))
 0.000683408 ((i--))
 0.075673816 tar -cf /tmp/test.tar -C / bin
 0.596389329 gzip /tmp/test.tar
 0.006565188 rm /tmp/test.tar.gz
 0.000830217 ((1))
 0.000759466 ((i--))
 0.024783966 tar -cf /tmp/test.tar -C / bin
 0.604119903 gzip /tmp/test.tar
 0.005172940 rm /tmp/test.tar.gz
 0.000952299 ((1))
 0.000827421 ((i--))
 1.635788924 total time
 1.636657204 EXIT

Using trap2 instead of trap as argument to source command:

#!/bin/bash

. elap.bash-v2 trap2
...

Will render two columns last command and total:

 0.000894541      0.000894541 Starting
 0.001306122      0.002200663 ((i=3))
 0.001929397      0.004130060 ((i--))
 0.103035812      0.107165872 sleep .1
 0.000875613      0.108041485 ((1))
 0.000813872      0.108855357 ((i--))
 0.104954517      0.213809874 sleep .1
 0.000900617      0.214710491 ((1))
 0.000842159      0.215552650 ((i--))
 0.104846890      0.320399540 sleep .1
 0.000899082      0.321298622 ((1))
 0.000811708      0.322110330 ((i--))
 0.000879455      0.322989785 elapCalc2
 0.322989785 first total
 0.000906692      0.323896477 elapShowTotal \e[1mfirst total\e[0m
 0.000820089      0.324716566 ((i=2))
 0.000773782      0.325490348 ((i--))
 0.024752613      0.350242961 tar -cf /tmp/test.tar -C / bin
 0.596199363      0.946442324 gzip /tmp/test.tar
 0.003007128      0.949449452 rm /tmp/test.tar.gz
 0.000791452      0.950240904 ((1))
 0.000779371      0.951020275 ((i--))
 0.030519702      0.981539977 tar -cf /tmp/test.tar -C / bin
 0.584155405      1.565695382 gzip /tmp/test.tar
 0.003058674      1.568754056 rm /tmp/test.tar.gz
 0.000955093      1.569709149 ((1))
 0.000919964      1.570629113 ((i--))
 1.571516599 total time
 0.001723708      1.572352821 EXIT

Using strace

Yes, strace could do the job:

strace -q -f -s 10 -ttt sample-script 2>sample-script-strace.log

But there could make a lot of stuff!

wc sample-script-strace.log
    6925  57637 586518 sample-script-strace.log

Using more restricted command:

strace -f -s 10 -ttt -eopen,access,read,write ./sample-script 2>sample-script-strace.log

Will dump ligther log:

  4519  36695 374453 sample-script-strace.log

Depending on what you're searching for, you may be more restrictive:

 strace -f -s 10 -ttt -eaccess,open ./sample-script 2>&1 | wc
  189    1451   13682

Reading them will be a little harder:

{
    read -a first
    first=${first//.}
    last=$first
    while read tim line;do
        crt=000000000$((${tim//.}-last))
        ctot=000000000$((${tim//.}-first))
        printf "%9.6f %9.6f %s\n" ${crt:0:${#crt}-6}.${crt:${#crt}-6} \
            ${ctot:0:${#ctot}-6}.${ctot:${#ctot}-6} "$line"
        last=${tim//.}
      done
  } < <(
    sed </tmp/sample-script.strace -e '
        s/^ *//;
        s/^\[[^]]*\] *//;
        /^[0-9]\{4\}/!d
  ')

 0.000110  0.000110 open("/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libtinfo.so.5", O_RDONLY) = 4
 0.000132  0.000242 open("/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libdl.so.2", O_RDONLY) = 4
 0.000121  0.000363 open("/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6", O_RDONLY) = 4
 0.000462  0.000825 open("/dev/tty", O_RDWR|O_NONBLOCK) = 4
 0.000147  0.000972 open("/usr/lib/locale/locale-archive", O_RDONLY) = 4
 ...
 0.000793  1.551331 open("/etc/ld.so.cache", O_RDONLY) = 4
 0.000127  1.551458 open("/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6", O_RDONLY) = 4
 0.000545  1.552003 open("/usr/lib/locale/locale-archive", O_RDONLY) = 4
 0.000439  1.552442 --- SIGCHLD (Child exited) @ 0 (0) ---

The original bash script is not so easy to follow in this...

Tests and conclusion

To make tests, I've downloaded second sample at bash complex hello world, this script take approx 0.72 sec to complete on my host.

I've add at top on of the script one of:

  • by elap.bash function

    #!/bin/bash
    
    source elap.bash-v2 trap2
    
    eval "BUNCHS=(" $(perl <<EOF | gunzip
    ...
    
  • by set -x and PS4

    #!/bin/bash
    
    PS4='+ $(date "+%s.%N")\011 '
    exec 3>&2 2>/tmp/bashstart.$$.log
    set -x
    
    eval "BUNCHS=(" $(perl <<EOF | gunzip
    ...
    
  • by set -x and initial fork to long exec command

    #!/bin/bash
    
    exec 3>&2 2> >(tee /tmp/sample-time.$$.log |
                     sed -u 's/^.*$/now/' |
                     date -f - +%s.%N >/tmp/sample-time.$$.tim)
    set -x
    
    eval "BUNCHS=(" $(perl <<EOF | gunzip
    

Times

And compare execution times (on my host):

  • Direct 0.72 sec
  • elap.bash 13.18 sec
  • set + date@PS4 54.61 sec
  • set + 1 fork 1.45 sec
  • strace 4.47 sec

Outputs

  • by elap.bash function

         0.000950277      0.000950277 Starting
         0.007618964      0.008569241 eval "BUNCHS=(" $(perl <<EOF | gunzi
         0.005259953      0.013829194 BUNCHS=("2411 1115 -13 15 33 -3 15 1
         0.010945070      0.024774264 MKey="V922/G/,2:"
         0.001050990      0.025825254 export RotString=""
         0.004724348      0.030549602 initRotString
         0.001322184      0.031871786 for bunch in "${BUNCHS[@]}"
         0.000768893      0.032640679 out=""
         0.001008242      0.033648921 bunchArray=($bunch)
         0.000741095      0.034390016 ((k=0))
    
  • by set -x and PS4

    ++ 1388598366.536099290  perl
    ++ 1388598366.536169132  gunzip
    + 1388598366.552794757   eval 'BUNCHS=(' '"2411' 1115 -13 15 33 -3 15 1
    ++ 1388598366.555001983  BUNCHS=("2411 1115 -13 15 33 -3 15 13111 -6 1
    + 1388598366.557551018   MKey=V922/G/,2:
    + 1388598366.558316839   export RotString=
    + 1388598366.559083848   RotString=
    + 1388598366.560165147   initRotString
    + 1388598366.560942633   local _i _char
    + 1388598366.561706988   RotString=
    
  • by set -x and initial fork to long exec command (and my second paste sample script)

     0.000000000  0.000000000    ++ perl
     0.008141159  0.008141159    ++ gunzip
     0.000007822  0.008148981    + eval 'BUNCHS=(' '"2411' 1115 -13 15 33 -3 
     0.000006216  0.008155197    ++ BUNCHS=("2411 1115 -13 15 33 -3 15 13111 
     0.000006216  0.008161413    + MKey=V922/G/,2:
     0.000006076  0.008167489    + export RotString=
     0.000006007  0.008173496    + RotString=
     0.000006006  0.008179502    + initRotString
     0.000005937  0.008185439    + local _i _char
     0.000006006  0.008191445    + RotString=
    
  • by strace

     0.000213  0.000213 brk(0)                = 0x17b6000
     0.000044  0.000257 access("/etc/ld.so.nohwcap", F_OK) = -1 ENOENT (No such file or directory)
     0.000047  0.000304 mmap(NULL, 8192, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0) = 0x7faf1c0dc000
     0.000040  0.000344 access("/etc/ld.so.preload", R_OK) = -1 ENOENT (No such file or directory)
     0.000040  0.000384 open("/etc/ld.so.cache", O_RDONLY) = 4
     ...
     0.000024  4.425049 close(10)             = 0
     0.000042  4.425091 rt_sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK, NULL, [], 8) = 0
     0.000028  4.425119 read(255, "", 4409)   = 0
     0.000058  4.425177 exit_group(0)         = ?
    

Conclusion

Well! If my pure bash is quicker than forking to date on each command, my pure bash implie some operations on each command.

The way of dedicating an independant process for logging and storing is clearly more efficient.

strace is an interesting way, more detailed, but hard to read.

Finaly, I think that the more efficient, in readability and performances is set + 1 fork, The first of this answer.

share|improve this answer
    
    
The Times section is pretty informative and drives home that the forks are nothing to sneeze at (indeed completely dominating many kinds of scripts). +1 for a good (if long-drawn) answer. Perhaps in the future you should consider posting separate answers –  sehe Jun 23 at 12:20
1  
Many thanks, @sehe ! You will find a full ready-to-run bash source file there: elap-bash-v3 (whith some feature like permitting transparent use of STDIN and STDERR) –  F. Hauri Jul 4 at 14:55
    
Syntax: to profile myfile.sh using elap-bash-v3: bash -c ". elap-bash-v3;. myfile.sh" without having to edit myfile.sh. (This will be added to answer... later...) –  F. Hauri Jul 14 at 19:17
    
Now on github.com! –  F. Hauri Jul 24 at 6:53

It often helps to trace the system calls

strace -c -f ./script.sh

From the manual:

-c Count time, calls, and errors for each system call and report a summary on program exit.

-f Trace child processes ...

This is not exactly what you want and what a line-oriented profiler would show to you but it usually helps to find hot spots.

share|improve this answer

You may have a look at trap command with DEBUG condition. There is a way to set a command(s) to be executed along with your commands. See the notes to the answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, it's before each command. –  Dennis Williamson Feb 16 '11 at 15:18
    
@Dennis Williamson: I haven't used it for a while, but the help on my system states that "If a SIGNAL_SPEC is DEBUG, ARG is executed after every simple command." –  user332325 Feb 16 '11 at 15:27
    
From Bash 4.0.33 help trap: "If a SIGNAL_SPEC is DEBUG, ARG is executed before every simple command." In Bash 3.2, it says "after". That's a typo. As of Bash 2.05b, it's run before. Reference: "This document details the changes between this version, bash-2.05b-alpha1, and the previous version, bash-2.05a-release. ... 3. New Features in Bash ... w. The DEBUG trap is now run before simple commands, ((...)) commands, [[...]] conditional commands, and for ((...)) loops." Testing in each version confirms that it's before. –  Dennis Williamson Feb 16 '11 at 16:23
    
@Dennis Williamson: Ok, then that's what version i have. I fix the answer:) –  user332325 Feb 16 '11 at 21:01

Time, xtrace, bash -x, set -x and set+x (http://tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-Guide/html/sect_02_03.html) remain the orthodox way to debug a script.

Neverteless to enlarge our horizon, it's possible to give a check to some system for debugging and profiling available for the usual Linux programs [here one of the lists], e.g. it should result useful one based on valgrind especially to debug memory or sysprof to profile the whole system:

For sysprof:

With sysprof, you can profile all the applications that are running on your machine, including a multithreaded or multiprocessed application...

And after to select the branch of sub-processes that you find interesting.


For Valgrind:
With some more gym, it seems it's possible to make visible to Valgrind some programs that usually we install from binary (e.g. OpenOffice).

It's possible to read from the FAQ of valgrind that Valgrind will profile the child processes if explicitely requested.

... Even if by default it profiles only traces the top-level process, and so if your program is started by a shell script, Perl script, or something similar, Valgrind will trace the shell, or the Perl interpreter, or equivalent...

It will do it with this option enabled

 --trace-children=yes 

Additional References:

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