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I have a client-server game, where the client connects to a server and stays connected during the game (approx 5-60 min).

I want new clients to be able to register securely, as well as allowing existing clients to authenticate with no worries that the login credentials are exposed.

The thing is that for performance reasons it would be best to stick with a simple and cheap encryption like RC4 for the game session, but a symmetric key does not make it easy to secure the registration procedure.

Since I will want to keep a separate login server anyway, my idea is like this:

  1. Client sends a HTTPS request to the login server with credentials (or registration information)
  2. The login server collects the user information, and generates a temporary RC4 session encryption key
  3. The user information + RC4 session + timestamp + digest (I can rely on both servers to be synchronized timewise) with a secret symmetric key, shared between game server and login server.
  4. The packaged data + RC4 session encryption key + ip address to the game server is sent as a reply to the HTTPS request to the client.
  5. The client opens a connection to the game server, sends an initial unencrypted hello message with the encrypted user information as a payload.
  6. The game server unpacks the data packaged in (3). It now knows the user and the RC4 encryption key it is supposed to use.
  7. If the timestamp indicates that the login credentials has expired, an error is returned to the client (who is then to retrieve new information). If the decrypted user data cannot be verified with the digest a different error is returned.
  8. If everything checks ok, the server sends an unencrypted LOGIN_OK, and the RC4 encrypted communication starts.

Possible security concerns:

  • The game server 100% trusts the user info it has decrypted. This makes the servers completely decoupled which is nice, but if the key is compromised, users could completely fake their user info. This could be alleviated somewhat by rotating these keys, so that every day or month has a new key. Both game and login servers could get this from a third server that manages their keys. It might be overkill since: a) in case of a break-in where source code is exposed on the servers, they can be restarted with a new key b) a good enough key + encryption should make brute force attacks hard (suggestions on algorithm?)

  • RC4 isn't the most secure algorithm, but I make sure to throw away the first 512 bytes or so and each key is only valid for a limited time, e.g. 24h.

  • Doesn't seem susceptible to man-in-the middle from what I can see: SSL secures the RC4 session key, in (5) the RC4 session key sent to the game server is encrypted as well. All that is possible is DoS and to cause the user request a key again. If the data in (2) is cached until it expires, this should not create a new packet.

  • The encryption in (3) could be improved by adding random bits to the key. Those random bits are sent together with the encrypted packet, and presented to the game server in (5). In (6) the game server adds those random bits to his key and uses the result to decrypt the data. This way and attacker cannot see when the packed data changes.

Are there any vulnerabilities I'm overlooking here?

A summary of payloads created:

  • Client login-credentials (protected by SSL), sent to login server
  • User info + timestamp + temporary game server session key + digest encrypted by login server using a secret key shared with game server, given to the client that - without modifying it - passes it to the game server. Ought to be temper resistant because: a) client does not know the secret key b) has timestamp to avoid resending same data c) digest to verify content was encrypted correctly
  • temporary game server session key sent by the login server to the client together with the encrypted payload. Protected by SSL.
  • Client game server login packet, consists of encrypted packet received by login server.

A summary of encryption keys:

  • Temporary game server session key: randomly generated by login server for encrypted game server <-> client communication. Generated by login server, given to client and game server.
  • Secret user info encryption key. Shared between game server and login server, used pass user info to game server with client as messenger. Client does not possess this key.
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5 Answers

First of all I wouldn't use RC4. There are both faster and more secure stream ciphers around so if you control both client and server then you can probably do better than RC4. Discarding only 512 bytes may not be enough for the Fluhrer, Mantin and Shamir attack, but even if you discard more bytes there's also the Klein's attack etc. I don't know if it's worth the trouble.

Second, make sure that the keys you generate are random. I know it seems obvious but for an example see: http://www.debian.org/security/2008/dsa-1571

But the real problem is this part: "The game server 100% trusts the user info it has decrypted. This makes the servers completely decoupled which is nice, but if the key is compromised, users could completely fake their user info."

You have to assume that the user knows the key. His game client has to know the key so it can communicate with the server. If the user can use his real data to log in via ssl, get a key for stream cipher and then send whatever info he wants to the game server then all the attacker has to do is just get an account and do whatever he wants.

It doesn't matter how often you change the key because every time you change it you have to still give it to the client so you might as well change it after every byte and it still wouldn't matter here.

This is more important than the cipher used or the key generation because no one will brute force the key if he just gets it.

You should never trust the client. You should store the client data on the server side and match it with the key or sign the data and verify it or use HMAC etc. because if the game server 100% trusts the user info then you will have problems sooner o later. There is pretty much no way around it.

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"You have to assume that the user knows the key. His game client has to know the key so it can communicate with the server." Ummm, the client only passes on the encrypted user info from the login to the game server. Since the client never decrypts it, the client does not have the key. The client is given a session key for encrypted communication with the game server, but this is quite a different key. –  Nuoji Feb 16 '11 at 15:06
    
For generating keys in Java (and in this case both game server and login server is in java) I usually go with SecureRandom and in particular SHA1PRNG. Good enough? –  Nuoji Feb 16 '11 at 15:24
    
What would you suggest as alternatives to RC4? –  Nuoji Feb 16 '11 at 22:47
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It sounds like you're trying to reinvent SSL. Why not issue each client a certificate (signed by your own root authority), and have them connect to the game server over SSL, with mutual authentication?

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The game server is supposed to be able to handle a large amount of simultaneous players. With the servers in Java, I'm using non-blocking sockets. Unfortunately, this means implementing SSL on top of the standard sockets. In the process of doing so, I discovered that each connection will need to allocate around 32kb because of the way the SSL engine is implemented in java. An unencrypted version would use less than 100 bytes. This memory requirement + the fact that the java SSL implementation is a really bad match for non-blocking IO, made me look for other solutions. –  Nuoji Feb 18 '11 at 10:56
    
@Nuoji Wait, Java doesn't support SSL over asynchronous sockets? Even if that's the case, I'd be astounded if nobody's tackled this before. Regarding the overhead argument, you need to decide on your threat model, and whether server overhead or security are more important to you. –  Nick Johnson Feb 19 '11 at 6:54
    
No, there is no async SSL built in. It's been implemented of course, and I made an implementation myself too. I think it's a matter of scale. Things are a bit different when you design for 5000+ simultaneous connections. –  Nuoji Feb 19 '11 at 15:03
    
@Nuoji As I say, you need to consider your threat model. If you care about security, you need to use SSL, regardless of the additional overhead. –  Nick Johnson Feb 20 '11 at 3:49
    
I doubt I'd have NSA or similar trying to crack it. A very clever and dedicated cheater is pretty likely though. As long as the messages take enough time to crack (say a week) it's quite ok. –  Nuoji Feb 20 '11 at 14:10
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I understand you cannot use SSL between the game server and the client as you don't want to go through the handshake again.

The protocol seems ok from a first glance. There is no replay attack also as you really need the symmetric session key to do anything meaningful. The best thing you can do is switch to AES is also very fast and very secure. I highly doubt you will see any performance hit by switching to AES.

Also the first security concern bullet point you mentioned is not really a concern. Well it is a concern for all clients on the desktop, for example your browser has the same problem talking over HTTPS. So you don't really have to solve it. Your game logic somehow has to look for bad behavior if you want to actively monitor manipulation attempts. You cannot solve it by re-keying.

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I wonder if the encryption needs to be all that good. I'm encrypting for two reasons: 1) It authenticates the player to the game server - by showing the game server that it knows how to encrypt data, it verifies that it has received a valid session key from the login server. 2) It prevents casual eavesdropping that would allow an attacker see opponent's gameplay. The amount of packets between game server and player is typically small (less than 1k packets per game session, one game session a day) and the info rapidly becomes worthless within a few days anyway. Might RC4 still be acceptable? –  Nuoji Feb 18 '11 at 11:12
    
@Nuoiji - Sure ok I can buy that argument. So in effect the RC4 encryption only tells you that the user is authenticated and in addition to that you are getting protection from casual eavesdroppers and casual attackers. My only suggestion is tomorrow if the game becomes popular and you introduce some kind of currency and commerce in the game it might become more attractive to be attackers at which point you might want to beef up the encryption, right? If so why even bother with RC4 if it does not give you a performance improvement? I understand if you go with RC4 too. –  user220201 Feb 18 '11 at 15:39
    
There are two other nice properties of RC4: 1) It works with smaller keys, which is useful if I'd take a stab at avoiding CCATS Commodity Classification procedure for the client, by using a key 64-bits or less. 2) It's a stream cipher, which is very convenient to code for when the protocol typically works on a stream anyway. –  Nuoji Feb 20 '11 at 14:16
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I ended up also posting on sci.crypt and I'll try to summarize the suggested changes (as far as I understand them) below in case it might be of interest.

Step 1: Client sends a HTTPS request to the login server with credentials

Assuming that the credentials take the form of a login token, also add a self-assigned unique id.

Step 3: The user information + RC4 session + timestamp + digest

Use an encryption algorithm that ensures integrity, instead of using a digest explicitly. E.g. AES-GCM or AES-CCM. Add the extra id field in step 1. Add the ip to the game server as well.

Step 4: The packaged data + RC4 session encryption key + ip address to the game server is sent as a reply.

Giving the timestamp to the client will allow the client to know when the session has expired. This avoids unnecessary connects to the game server with expired credentials.

Step 5: The client opens a connection to the game server, sends an initial unencrypted hello message with the encrypted user information as a payload.

Add the self-assigned id in step 1 unencrypted to the payload.

Step 6: The game server unpacks the data packaged in (3). It now knows the user and the RC4 encryption key it is supposed to use.

The game server matches both its own ip with the encrypted ip, as well as the encrypted id with the id given by the client. The first prevents the user from going to a different server with the same credentials.

Step 8: If everything checks ok, the server sends an unencrypted LOGIN_OK, and the RC4 encrypted communication starts.

At this point the game server cannot be sure of the client's identity. Use the session key and encrypt nonce + strictly increasing session id + login success state using AES-GCM/CCM and send it to the client.

The client decrypts and checks the login success state. If this is true, then the client knows that the game server knows the session key (GCM/CCM verifies that the packet has not been tampered with). The client returns sid + nonce.

The server verifies sid + nonce is the same as the values sent.

Finally the client and server creates new session keys by hash-ing the session key with sid + nonce + salt to create the key for the consequent communication, to prevent a possible replay attack.

Regarding RC4

There are vulnerabilities in RC4, but it probably would suffice for this scheme because of the rather aggressive key rescheduling. However, there are modern ciphers which are more secure and faster, such as Snow 2.0 or Trivium.

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Just use SSL to the game server. Modern cryptanalysis has resulted in a few very fast implementations of some of the better encryption algorithms. For example, well optimized AES implementations can easily encrypt at better than 150MB/s on any remotely modern machine. Also while AES is held with high regard, it does have two weaknesses that I know of, but when used correctly those weaknesses become insignificant.

I noticed that you failed to mention that you would be using an advanced key scheduling algorithm between the client and the game server. Failing to do so would make the weaknesses of the encryption algorithm much more severe. SSL/TLS should do the key scheduling for you.

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Interesting. What are these two weaknesses in AES you talk about? –  user220201 Feb 17 '11 at 19:46
    
See my reply to Nick Johnson regarding why I would like to avoid SSL to the game server. Could you clarify your passage regarding the key scheduling algorithm? –  Nuoji Feb 18 '11 at 11:02
    
@user220201 AES has a related key weakness, but that's irrelevant if you perform correct key derivation, and whats called a cache-timing-attack, but that requires the eavesdropper to be able to execute code on the machine doing the encrypting/decrypting. –  Lunatic Experimentalist Feb 19 '11 at 21:19
    
@Nuoji In the key scheduling part I meant that you need to change the encryption and authentication keys periodically in a manner that would be hard for an eavesdropper to predict. There is no perfect way to do that, but some ways will be better than others. –  Lunatic Experimentalist Feb 19 '11 at 21:25
    
As you see in the description, the login server creates the session key. This key could be valid for 1 minute or 24 hours - I don't know what's a reasonable time. In any case, the session key will be generated from reasonably secure pseudo-random. There should be no correlation at all between two different session keys generated for the same user at different times. –  Nuoji Feb 20 '11 at 14:06
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