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I have following table structure:

CREATE TABLE pilot_groups (
id INT PK,
name VARCHAR(50),
....
);

CREATE TABLE pilot_group_leaders (
id INT PK,
pilot_group_id INT FK,
name VARCHAR(50),
address TEXT,
....
);

CREATE TABLE members (
id INT PK,
pilot_group_leader_id INT FK,
country_id INT FK,
type VARCHAR(50),
name VARCHAR(50),
....
);

CREATE TABLE farms (
id INT PK,
member_id INT FK,
....
);

So I have to produce a report and show all farms grouped by pilot_group. To do it using current structure I'll have to do 3 joins which in my opinion is not very optimized and efficient. I was thinking of placing extra foreign key in the farms table but thus I'll have repetition. The purpose of the website/application would be mainly for producing reports and entering data. Which approach might be better?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Stick with your current version, dont duplicate the foreign keys.

You should be able to get away with some indexes on the tables.

Dont fix it if it aint broke. Do you actually have performance issues, or are you anticipating them?

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I don't have performance issues. I'm still in design phase so just trying to spot any pitfalls I might have forth. –  infinity Feb 16 '11 at 12:16
    
Then I really dont think this will be required. Just stick to the basics, and think of major changes like these when you get performance issues. This should be one of your last options. –  Adriaan Stander Feb 16 '11 at 12:20

Dropping the 'id' keys entirely and using natural primary keys might help a lot. But then, saying this will cost me karma :-)

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2  
I'll upvote anybody who advocates natural keys. In this case the name of the farm (? not shown) and the name of the pilot group are likely candidates. Reducing the number of joins on arbitrary id numbers often pays off in faster SELECT performance. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Feb 16 '11 at 12:57

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