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under linux :

#free -m
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:          1995       1460        534          0         68        432
-/+ buffers/cache:        959       1035
Swap:         2055        743       1311

# cat /proc/sys/vm/overcommit_memory
0

#cat /proc/sys/vm/overcommit_ratio

50

test code 1:

#define PER_PAGE_SIZE 4096
#define MMAP(fd,offset) mmap (NULL,PER_PAGE_SIZE,PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE,MAP_SHARED|MAP_NORESERVE,fd,offset)


int main(){
    int j = 0;
    int fd = open("dat.tmp",O_RDWR);
    for(int i = 131071 ; i >= 0; i--){
        ++j;        
        void* r = MMAP(fd,i*4096);
        if(r ==  MAP_FAILED){
            printf("%d,%m\n",j);
            break; 
        }    
    }  
    cout << "done " << j << endl;          
    sleep(5); 
}
##############
error  message :
# ./a.out 
65513,Cannot allocate memory
done 65513
...
#################

test code 2:

#define PER_PAGE_SIZE 4096
#define MMAP(fd,offset) mmap (NULL,PER_PAGE_SIZE,PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE,MAP_SHARED|MAP_NORESERVE,fd,offset)

int main(){
    int j = 0;
    int fd = open("dat.tmp",O_RDWR);
    for(int i = 0 ; i <= 131071; i++){
        ++j;        
        void* r = MMAP(fd,i*4096);
        if(r ==  MAP_FAILED){
            printf("%d,%m\n",j);
            break; 
        }    
    }  
    cout << "done " << j << endl;          
    sleep(5); 
}

This works, so,why??????????

share|improve this question
    
What happens if you start the second program with " <= 131071 "? Also could you try formatting the C code better (try 4 spaces before the C code), it's pretty unreadble this way. –  ondra Feb 16 '11 at 12:52
    
sorry,the code has been re-formatted. –  user619600 Feb 17 '11 at 1:24
    
In the two cases : loop variable from large to small change, and from small to large changes , the mmap behavior is different. When the loop variable is the change from big to small and the counter "j" reached 65513, the "mmap" call failed(can not alloc memory) ,on the contrary it does work. –  user619600 Feb 17 '11 at 1:39
    
I can't reproduce the problem. What's the output of uname -a on your system? –  Omnifarious Feb 17 '11 at 14:17

1 Answer 1

Here is my guess. I'm guessing the second program simply extends an internal data structure describing a single mapping to include one more page. The first one could do this, but it would have to extend backwards instead, and I bet the special case code to coalesce mappings doesn't even check for that.

The fact that it stops at 65513 is very suggestive. There will be some number of mappings used for shared libraries and the like, so you will have less than 65536 mappings available to you. And 65536 is the kind of size a lot of kernel people would use for a data structure.

I would suggest looking at /proc/<pid>/maps and seeing how many maps are listed in each case when the program is sleeping. To facilitate this, you might want to print out the result of getpid() when you're printing out the 'done' message.

I cannot replicate your problem directly, so it seems the reverse case has been handled properly on my system. The output of uname -a on my system is this:

Linux a_hostname.somewhere 2.6.35.11-83.fc14.x86_64 #1 SMP Mon Feb 7 07:06:44 UTC 2011 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

But this program does replicate your problem:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstddef>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define PER_PAGE_SIZE 4096
#define MMAP(fd,offset) mmap (NULL,PER_PAGE_SIZE,PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE,MAP_SHARED|MAP_NORESERVE,fd,offset)

int main()
{
   using ::std::cout;
   using ::std::endl;
   int j = 0;
   int fd = open("dat.tmp",O_RDWR);
   char catcmd[] = "cat /proc/99999/maps_padding";
   for(int i = 131071 ; i >= 0; i-=2){
      ++j;
      void* r = MMAP(fd,i*4096);
      if(r ==  MAP_FAILED){
         cout << j << ", " << strerror(errno) << '\n';
         break;
      }
   }
   ::std::snprintf(catcmd, sizeof(catcmd), "cat /proc/%d/maps", getpid());
   cout.flush();
   ::std::system(catcmd);
   cout << "done " << j << endl;
   sleep(5);
}

As you can see, if you skip by 2 while going backwards, the problem still occurs. And the output of cat /proc/<pid>/maps from the call to system shows that indeed, there are thousands of individual maps.

If I stop skipping by 2 and simply go backwards I end up with 2 maps, one largish, and another not quite so large. The kernel coalesces adjacent maps into one map if it can.

As further corroborating evidence that your problem is as I describe, there's this nice discussion of /proc/sys/vm/max_map_count. Setting that variable allows you to change how many maps there are, and the default setting is 65530.

share|improve this answer
    
Have a look at this thread about mapping limit: thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.lib.glibc.user/538/focus=546 –  ydroneaud Feb 17 '11 at 15:44
    
@ydroneaud - Thanks for the link. That's interesting to know. I think I'll copy some of the information at the end of it into my answer. –  Omnifarious Feb 17 '11 at 16:47
    
@ydroneaud -Thanks for your answers,I will follow these methods to solve my problems. –  user619600 Feb 18 '11 at 1:25
    
@user619600 - It's considered polite to accept the answer that helps you the most, if it seems generally complete and helpful. –  Omnifarious Feb 18 '11 at 1:34

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