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The following code should work, since join accepts an iterator as argument:

import static org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils.join;
import java.text.StringCharacterIterator;

…

join(new StringCharacterIterator("A String"), " ");

Alas, it doesn’t. Can somebody explain to me why?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to the documentation, StringCharacterIterator inherits from and only from CharacterIterator. A CharacterIterator does not inherit from a generic Iterator, which is what join wants.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/text/CharacterIterator.html

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so the answer is that the Java standard library is a mess. So i need this –  flying sheep Feb 16 '11 at 13:07
    
@flying sheep: Partly, yes. When you deal with cross-libraries, like Oracle/Java with Apache, it gets even messier. –  Evan Mulawski Feb 16 '11 at 13:08
    
No. The fact that it ends with Iterator doesn't mean it must have the same interface. A HashTable doesn't have much in common with a WoodenTable. –  JB Nizet Feb 16 '11 at 13:10
1  
I don’t want to argue about this. “Iterator” is an unambiguous term in most programming languages (one of which being Java). You just don’t call something an iterator if it doesn’t implement the builtin interface of the same name. –  flying sheep Feb 16 '11 at 13:25
    
@flying sheep Actually if you look at the javadoc for the Iterator class it talks explicitly about a collection (which an array is not, or there wouldn't be the utility method to convert it to a collection). Also a String is a character array, which as is shown is not a collection in Oracle land. My guess is it is called StringCharacterIterator because CharacterArrayTraversalAgent didn't sound as nice. –  Woot4Moo Feb 16 '11 at 14:05

First of all, the join method takes two arguments : an iterator and a separator string or char.

And if you look at the javadoc of StringCharacterIterator, you'll see that this class does not implement java.util.Iterator.

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Ah, of course, i forgot to type the second argument. It is in my code, however. –  flying sheep Feb 16 '11 at 13:09

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