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An interruption exception (java.lang.InterruptedException) occurs as I'm trying to perform some simple read (SELECT) operations using C3P0 on a MySQL database. The exception occurs as I increase the number of parallel threads more than 100 (I have tried with 5,10,20,60 and 100). The statement I execute is as simple as :

SELECT `Model.id` FROM `Model` LIMIT 100;

My connections are pooled from a ComboPooledDataSource which is configured using the following properties (see also the C3P0 manual):

c3p0.jdbcUrl=jdbc:mysql... 
c3p0.debugUnreturnedConnectionStackTraces=true
c3p0.maxIdleTime=5
c3p0.maxPoolSize=1000
c3p0.minPoolSize=5
c3p0.initialPoolSize=5
c3p0.acquireIncrement=3
c3p0.acquireRetryAttempts=50
c3p0.numHelperThreads=20
c3p0.checkoutTimeout=0
c3p0.testConnectionOnCheckin=true
c3p0.testConnectionOnCheckout=true
user=***
password=***

The MySQL server on the machine I run the tests is configured to accept 1024 connections and the unit tests I run are successfully executed (the data are retrieved from the database as expected). However, in the C3P0 log file, I find the following warning:

15:36:11,449  WARN BasicResourcePool:1876 - com.mchange.v2.resourcepool.BasicResourcePool@9ba6076 -- Thread unexpectedly interrupted while performing an acquisition attempt.
java.lang.InterruptedException: sleep interrupted
    at java.lang.Thread.sleep(Native Method)
    at com.mchange.v2.resourcepool.BasicResourcePool$AcquireTask.run(BasicResourcePool.java:1805)
    at com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$PoolThread.run(ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner.java:547)

I'd like to know the reason for that warning and second its possible impact on the software's robustness and stability. Note that after use, I close the result set, the SQL statement and the connection. Finally, once the test is over, I close the pool by calling the method ComboPooledDataSource#close(). What is more weird (and seems to be to reveal a synchronization problem), is that if I give enough time to the pool using the following...

Thread.sleep(10000); // wait for some time
datasource.close();

No warnings will appear in the logs! Dο you think this raises a thread safety issue for C3P0 or am I doing something the wrong way?

Update 1:

Let me mention that removing the Thread.sleep(10000), apart from what already mention, causes the following info to be logged in the MySQL log file:

110221 14:57:13 [Warning] Aborted connection 9762 to db: 'myDatabase' user: 'root'
host: 'localhost' (Got an error reading communication packets)

Might shed some more light...

Update 2:

Here is my MySQL server configuration. The number of maximum allowed connections by server is set to 1024 (as I mentioned above) which is adequate for what I'm trying to do.

[mysqld]
max_allowed_packet  = 64M
thread_concurrency      = 8
thread_cache_size       = 8
thread_stack        = 192K
query_cache_size = 0
query_cache_type = 0
max_connections = 1024
back_log = 50
innodb_thread_concurrency = 6
innodb_lock_wait_timeout = 120
log_warnings

To obfuscate any doubt, I verified that the maximum number of connections is properly set by:

show global variables where Variable_name='max_connections';
+-----------------+-------+
| Variable_name   | Value |
+-----------------+-------+
| max_connections | 1024  | 
+-----------------+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
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8  
This is not the droid you're looking for. –  Paul Tomblin Feb 16 '11 at 14:19
3  
Use the source, Pantelis. [okay, that's enough Star Wars references - can someone help this guy?] –  Spacedman Feb 16 '11 at 14:21
1  
I might be wrong here, but are you really supposed to close the connection? I'm not quite sure. Anyway, what probably happens is that C3PO worker threads are simply waiting for new requests to process for some time after the last one, then die. If you close the connection before that time, they are interrupted and die. (And produce this stack trace, which usually doesn't indicate an error.) If you wait for 30 seconds, they all die of natural causes and you don't get the stack trace. –  biziclop Feb 16 '11 at 14:52
    
@biziclop The connections should be closed manually otherwise the pool will soon run out of connections. The datasource should be also closed in order for the pooled connections to be discarded (otherwise the driver takes care of them and MySQL is unhappy printing warnings in the log). I think you're close to an answer but I don't understand how the whole thing works and how this could impact the connectivity to the DB server on the long run. –  Pantelis Sopasakis Feb 16 '11 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That warning comes from around line 2007 here. It seems to be a thread stuck trying to aquire a connection.

Perhaps because the pool is set up to aquire more connections than what your mysql server is configured to handle. This seems to make sense, as the default max_connection is 100 (or 151 depending on your mysql version)

So that thread trying to aquire a connection goes in to a sleep()/retry loop trying to aquire the connection - however you close the whole pool while it's inside that loop - that thread gets interrupted so all resources can be reclaimed when you close the pool.

So far, it seems no harm done, your code likely returns connections to the pool when you're done with it leaving them idle for others to use, and all your queries get through.

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This answer definitely provides some useful evidence about the error and the line (200&0 you pointed is indeed the source of the error. However the number of allowed connections allowed by MySQL is set to 1024! More, even that way this does not justify why a sleep of even 3 seconds solves the problem (currently I've set it to 10s for safety). –  Pantelis Sopasakis Feb 22 '11 at 10:07

Perhaps, InterruptedException is normal because some of c3p0 threads are waiting for connection and when you call close() these threads are interrupted. Though, according to your setup (100 clients, 1000 server connections), such necessity to wait for resource is not that obvious.
If you really interested, most reliable solution would be looking to c3p0 logs, perhaps, adding some more logs and recompiling...

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But should they wait for connection or for anything? I mean, this happens at the point where all connections have been closed and are re-pooled. Connection-wise there should be some kind of locking to prevent other threads from interrupting them. And one question is 'interrupting them from what?" –  Pantelis Sopasakis Feb 16 '11 at 15:20
1  
@Pantelis Sopasakis From sleeping and waiting if they are needed. Imagine you have a thread pool with varying size (between 5 and 1000 in your case) and you have to manage its size prudently. How would you do it? You can't shut down the threads immediately after use because that's not really pooling and you can't keep them forever either. So the obvious strategy is for threads to linger for a few seconds and if no new request comes in, terminate. If you interrupt this wait, they will terminate immediately, no serious harm done. –  biziclop Feb 16 '11 at 15:34
    
@biziclop Correct! But the "Thread.sleep(30000)" practice is just a workaround! How can I know when the pool is released so that I'm allowed to close it gracefully without interrupting anything going on? [I'll try to find in the source code which is the thread that manages the pool size] - Do you think it would be a good to have minPoolSize = maxPoolSize ? –  Pantelis Sopasakis Feb 16 '11 at 16:21
    
Just call close(), pool must handle its internal state itself. The fact that there are exceptions in log doesn't mean something wrong, exceptions may be logged for debugging purposes. –  Victor Sorokin Feb 16 '11 at 16:30
    
@Pantelis Sopasakis I wouldn't worry about it if I were you. InterruptedException is the natural (and safe) way for threads to be stopped, most programs don't even bother to log them. They shouldn't even be called exceptions, it was just the easiest way to fit it into the Java concept. As for the pool size, it depends on usage patterns. If the load on your server is more or less constant, use a fixed size pool, if it's mostly nothing then some frantic periods, then nothing again, use a dynamically sized one. –  biziclop Feb 16 '11 at 20:06

I just ran into this problem. Here was my setting for the DataSource:

 [java:comp/env/jdbc/pooledDS] = [com.mchange.v2.c3p0.ComboPooledDataSource [ acquireIncrement -> 3, acquireRetryAttempts -> 30, acquireRetryDelay -> 1000, autoCommitOnClose -> false, automaticTestTable -> null, breakAfterAcquireFailure -> false, checkoutTimeout -> 0, connectionCustomizerClassName -> null, connectionTesterClassName -> com.mchange.v2.c3p0.impl.DefaultConnectionTester, dataSourceName -> 2siwtu8o4m410i1l4tkxb|187c55c, debugUnreturnedConnectionStackTraces -> false, description -> null, driverClass -> null, factoryClassLocation -> null, forceIgnoreUnresolvedTransactions -> false, identityToken -> 2siwtu8o4m410i1l4tkxb|187c55c, idleConnectionTestPeriod -> 0, initialPoolSize -> 3, jdbcUrl -> null, maxAdministrativeTaskTime -> 0, maxConnectionAge -> 0, maxIdleTime -> 0, maxIdleTimeExcessConnections -> 0, maxPoolSize -> 15, maxStatements -> 0, maxStatementsPerConnection -> 0, minPoolSize -> 3, numHelperThreads -> 3, numThreadsAwaitingCheckoutDefaultUser -> 0, preferredTestQuery -> null, properties -> {}, propertyCycle -> 0, testConnectionOnCheckin -> false, testConnectionOnCheckout -> false, unreturnedConnectionTimeout -> 0, usesTraditionalReflectiveProxies -> false ]]

and fixed:

[java:comp/env/jdbc/pooledDS] = [com.mchange.v2.c3p0.ComboPooledDataSource [ acquireIncrement -> 3, acquireRetryAttempts -> 30, acquireRetryDelay -> 1000, autoCommitOnClose -> false, automaticTestTable -> null, breakAfterAcquireFailure -> false, checkoutTimeout -> 0, connectionCustomizerClassName -> null, connectionTesterClassName -> com.mchange.v2.c3p0.impl.DefaultConnectionTester, dataSourceName -> 2siwtu8o4m5kux117kgtx|13e754f, debugUnreturnedConnectionStackTraces -> false, description -> null, driverClass -> oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver, factoryClassLocation -> null, forceIgnoreUnresolvedTransactions -> false, identityToken -> 2siwtu8o4m5kux117kgtx|13e754f, idleConnectionTestPeriod -> 0, initialPoolSize -> 3, jdbcUrl -> jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:oracle, maxAdministrativeTaskTime -> 0, maxConnectionAge -> 0, maxIdleTime -> 0, maxIdleTimeExcessConnections -> 0, maxPoolSize -> 15, maxStatements -> 0, maxStatementsPerConnection -> 0, minPoolSize -> 3, numHelperThreads -> 3, numThreadsAwaitingCheckoutDefaultUser -> 0, preferredTestQuery -> null, properties -> {user=******, password=******}, propertyCycle -> 0, testConnectionOnCheckin -> false, testConnectionOnCheckout -> false, unreturnedConnectionTimeout -> 0, usesTraditionalReflectiveProxies -> false ]]

So not everything was set correctly. More concretely, when I called setDriverClass and setJdbcUrl to correct the null values, I eliminated the InterruptedException

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