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The problem is that Type.GetInterfaces() returns all interfaces that a class implements, this includes any interfaces that are defined/implemented by inherited base classes. I'm running into problems when I'm trying to find out just the interfaces that a class locally references / implements (so excluding any interfaces referenced/defined within a base class).

I want to do something similar to type.GetProperties() which can take BindingFlags, so the following code will get all public/private properties that are declared inside the type being referenced (and all properties declared in base classes are excluded).

type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly)

I've tried the following, but it fails as ".DeclaringType" is always null.

foreach (var implementedInterface in type.GetInterfaces())
{
    if (implementedInterface.DeclaringType == type)
    {
        locallyDefinedInterfaces.Add(implementedInterface);
    }
}
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1  
Why on earth do you want to do this? –  DJClayworth Feb 16 '11 at 14:38
    
@DJClayworth: do you actually mean, "Why do you want to do this, I may then be able to suggest another way?". It is to help some new members of staff that are learning .NET and OO from scratch so they can safely make changes to classes knowing that if the class definitions don't change then they're ok from that point of view. I'd agree it is usually overkill to assert / test this but in this instance amongst the team it has been decided that this level of testing would be benefical for at least the short term. On the most part these tests have only taken a very short time to write –  Paul Hadfield Feb 16 '11 at 14:58
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Can you not populate a collection with all interfaces it defines. Then, for each class starting from the one your target class derives from, get all interfaces that that class implements, removing from your list as you go. Repeat-and-rinse until you have no more base-classes. Whatever remains in your list are interfaces solely implemented by your original class.

Note: There may well be better ways of doing this, this is just a suggestion.

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1  
I think(but I'm not sure) you can re-implement the interface in the derived class which your code wouldn't handle. –  CodesInChaos Feb 16 '11 at 14:46
    
@CodeInChaos: Yes, that's correct both the class you are testing and the base class can reference the same interface. Which is a pain as I was also thinking about a recusive method similar to @Moo-Juice suggests. –  Paul Hadfield Feb 16 '11 at 15:02
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The reason that declared type is null, is probably because it is null... (since the interface is not declared within any type). Just an insight

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Yes, that was pretty much the conclusion I'd come to too, I added it for completeness as it was a test that I'd run. –  Paul Hadfield Feb 16 '11 at 14:52
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How about to use the is operator to check if the class is of that type. e.g


class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyClass c = new MyClass();
            MyClass1 c2 = new MyClass1();

            var b = c is IInterface;
            Console.WriteLine(b); //False
            Console.WriteLine(c2 is IInterface); //True
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    class MyClass
    {

    }
    class MyClass1 : IInterface
    {

    }
    interface IInterface
    {

    }
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1  
Doesn't solve the issue about not reporting interfaces implemented by the base class. –  Joe Enos Feb 16 '11 at 14:45
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Look here:

http://www.clariusconsulting.net/blogs/kzu/archive/2010/12/03/Howtoinspectatypeinheritancetreeproperly.aspx

This is a post by brilliant Daniel Cazzulino.

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URL isn't working at the moment, connection is timing out. Will check again later. –  Paul Hadfield Feb 16 '11 at 14:59
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