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Take this situation:

function edit($var)
{
    $var->test = "foo";
}

$obj = new stdClass;
edit($obj);

echo $obj->test; //"foo"

The edit function does not take the argument as a reference and it should not modify the original object so why does this happen?

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1  
possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/1107016/… –  Will Feb 16 '11 at 15:45
1  
possible duplicate of In PHP can someone explain cloning vs pointer reference? –  ircmaxell Feb 16 '11 at 15:55
    
@ircmaxell: Nice find. –  BoltClock Feb 16 '11 at 16:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because in PHP 5, references to objects are passed by value, as opposed to the objects themselves. That means your function argument $var and your calling-scope variable $obj are distinct references to the same object. This manual entry may help you.

To obtain a (shallow) copy of your object, use clone. In order to retrieve this copy, though, you need to return it:

function edit($var)
{
    $clone = clone $var;
    $clone->test = "foo";
    return $clone;
}

$obj = new stdClass;
$obj2 = edit($obj);

echo $obj2->test;

Or assign it to a reference argument, then call it like so:

function edit($var, &$clone)
{
    $clone = clone $var;
    $clone->test = "foo";
}

$obj = new stdClass;
edit($obj, $obj2);

echo $obj2->test;
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So there's no way in that function to modify only a copy of the object? –  mck89 Feb 16 '11 at 15:47
    
@mck89: There is, see my edit. –  BoltClock Feb 16 '11 at 15:48
    
If you clone, you should add a return statement to get the object you did modify –  3rgo Feb 16 '11 at 15:49
    
Great answer thanks –  mck89 Feb 16 '11 at 15:57

Classes attributes in php (as well as other languages like javascript) are always passed as references

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Variable References != Object References. They are different concepts with different effects. Don't confuse them... –  ircmaxell Feb 16 '11 at 15:56

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