Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public interface IProcessor<T>
{
  void Process(T instance);
}


foreach(AbstractType instance in myClass.SomeCollection)
  OnProcess(instance);

public void OnProcess<T>(T instance)
{
  IProcessor<T> processor = 
    unityContainer.Resolve<IProcessor<T>>();
  processor.Process(instance);
}

The problem with this code is that the in OnProcess is always AbstractType, and not the concrete type of the instance being passed. I currently see two possibilities.

01: Create a non generic IProcessor and use it as the base for IProcessor. Any implementor will have to implement both generic and non-generic Process methods, typically typecasting and passing onto the generic method.

02: Use Type.MakeGenericType to get the IProcessor, resolve that, and then use reflection to invoke the Process method.

Both of these approaches feel a bit "unclean". Can anyone think of a way I can do this without having to resort to these practices?

Thanks

Pete

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

2 will be a performance killer (the necessary dynamic/relection invoke in particular is slow)

1 is a common answer to this problem, especially with explicit implementation; the problem is getting hold of the type... does unity allow query with a Type instance, rather than via generics? If so something like below... of course, you might still have to use MakeGenericType:

Type intType = typeof(IProcessor<>).MakeGenericType(instanceType);
IProcessor proc = (IProcessor) IoC.Resolve(intType);

Where instanceType is perhaps via instance.GetType(). For similar reasons, it might be helpful to expose the T as a Type on the IProcessor:

public interface IProcessor
{
    void Process(object instance);
    Type InstanceType {get;}
}
public interface IProcessor<T> : IProcessor
{
    void Process(T instance);
}
class SomeClass: IProcessor<int>
{
    public void Process(int instance)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
    Type IProcessor.InstanceType {get {return typeof(int);}}
    void IProcessor.Process(object instance)
    {
        Process((int)instance);
    }
}

Of course, an (optional) base-class might allow you to avoid some of this per-implementation:

abstract class SomeBase<T> : IProcessor<T>
{
    public void Process(T instance)
    {
        OnProcess(instance);
    }
    Type IProcessor.InstanceType {get {return typeof(T);}}
    void IProcessor.Process(object instance)
    {
        Process((T)instance);
    }
    protected abstract void OnProcess(T instance);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've only just managed to get around to logging back into this site. It's funny that your SomeBase<T> suggestion is exactly what I came up with this morning when emailing with Mr Skeet on the subject :-) Thanks! –  Peter Morris Feb 5 '09 at 11:32
    
How do I mark your answer as the correct one? –  Peter Morris Feb 5 '09 at 11:38
1  
I think you found it ;-p –  Marc Gravell Feb 5 '09 at 13:14

If I understand your problem, you want to call a process that's dependent on 2 types (the type of processor, and the object being processed). Is that right? If that's the case, you can use a multi-method pattern for this kind of problem. Here's an example:

public interface IProcessor
{
    void Process( IThingToProcess p ); // Will call p.ProcessMe()
    void Process( ThingToProcess1 concreteP ); // Called back from ThingToProcess1.ProcessMe
}

public interface IThingToProcess
{
     void ProcessMe( IProcessor p );
}

public class ThingToProcess1 : IThingToProcess
{
    public void ProcessMe( IProcessor p ) { p.Process( this ); }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.